Jump to content

MyCarForum Logo
Magnifying glass



Ford is developing Biometric Driver Stress Detectors to enhance safety

By FaezClutchless on 04 Jul 2012

Attached Image

Driving can be a stressful thing for most people. For example, getting caught in a peak hour traffic jam. And at times, driving can be boring and distracting too. So, what can be done about this? It seems that Ford is working on a biometric driver stress detector that determines the driver’s “workload.”

Attached Image

The concept relates to attention and performance behind the wheel in a unique manner. The system integrates various biometric measurements such as pulse, galvanic skin response and breathing rate.

Biometrics is essentially the study of identifying people through certain characteristics or traits. The auto industry uses biometrics extensively. Volvo has their City Safety System which scans the road ahead of the car even if the driver is not paying attention and will apply the brakes to prevent accidents.

Mercedes Benz’s Attention Assist monitors the driver to see if they are feeling sleepy and Nissan has car seats that’ll sense alcohol on your breath and even on your skin. If the system detects alcohol levels over a certain amount, it will lock down the ignition while advising you via the audio and display systems.

Ford’s biometric system known as the Driver Workload Estimator; monitors the workload level (stress, feeling bored, etc.) through sensors on the car’s seat, seat belt, steering wheel, and even steering column.

Attached Image

Depending on traffic conditions, which the system monitors via radar, cameras, and even car-to-car communication systems, the Ford Driver Workload Estimator will prepare the car safety systems for possible accidents to actually blocking incoming calls from smartphones as the driver struggles to navigate their vehicle safely. When the system detects lesser traffic and the driver is less stressed, it will start to release these said blocks.

The in-car system gathers the information for the alerts from its onboard sensors, leveraging systems like blindspot detection and lane-keeping assist to detect traffic flow and quantity nearby, adjusting its alert status for the environment. Other sensors, like throttle position and steering position evaluate the driver's responsiveness and attention to what the sensors are seeing and react with alerts accordingly.

How does Ford measure the driver’s heart rate galvanic skin response? Through sensors built into the steering wheel and seat belt. Like common gym exercise equipment, metal plates built into the steering wheel can sense pulse and skin conductivity.

A sensor build into the seat belt can sense the driver's breathing. In addition, infrared can sense changes in body and skin temperature relative to the cabin temperature, reactions that might indicate a change in alertness or agitation, especially when it corresponds with the other sensors' information.

At this moment, these technologies are still in the research stage although Ford has mentioned that they do have working prototypes for them. Ford has not given any time frame for the system to be included in production vehicles.

Photo credit: Ford

new technology, safety and 9 more...

Viewed: 948 times

Related Blog Posts
Written by FaezClutchless
Some say that his blood is actually RON98 petrol and some say that his right foot weighs over 20kg. But all that we know about Faez is that he loves to drive and is a JDM enthusiast.

Car Makes

Please select a car make

Facebook Likes
   Featured Blog Post
With a bit of quick thinking, this man hid his E30 BMW M3 in his living room when he heard Hurric...
Renault's next Megane RS has been spotted in South Europe doing some testing with minimal cam...
Bild, a German publication, has reported that Volkswagen is worried about its 70,000 employees pl...
Prices of the Porsche 911 R have rocketed so high that used examples are selling for up to seven...
The Honda NSX is slated to come Singapore some time next year and according to paultan.org, it is...
According to Autocar, Mercedes-Benz is already developing the second generation of the model and...
   Lifestyle Articles