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The evolution of...Tuk-tuks...

By Deeq on 16 Jun 2015 in Hybrid/electric cars, Concept cars

Attached Image Tuk-tuks might be everyday, ubiquitous transportation in Thailand or Phnom Penh, but can these tiny three-wheeled taxis also find a place in sprawling, car-obsessed cities like Singapore?
 
A design student has reimagined a sleek, electric, app-connected version of the vehicle, called the Lindo, that could give city dwellers a new option for public transportation. The system is designed to be more flexible than taking a bus or train stuck on a fixed route, and more sustainable than riding in a full-sized taxi or Uber car.
 
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The designer, RMIT University student Kyle Armstrong, sees the vehicle as a way to help ease traffic in Melbourne, Australia, his quickly-growing hometown. "With more people come more cars, which in turn creates more congestion and pollution," he says. "What I hoped to address with the Lindo was the current stress of population growth and congestion within our cities, and to help counteract the effects of emissions."
 
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The design is a concept for now. He sketched out a vision of an Uber-like app that would hail electric vehicles for a pick up. Inside the vehicle, a rider could use the app to play music from his or her phone, change the lighting in the passenger compartment, or instantly pay for a ride. The Lindo could also be used as a delivery service, picking up and dropping off a package rather than a person.
 
The biggest challenge for the designer was altering the look of the classic tuk-tuk (also called an auto rickshaw) and turning it into something that people in Melbourne would actually want to ride in. "This was no easy task, as the vehicle was innately awkward, ugly, and out of fashion," Armstrong says.
 
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The end result was curved carbon fiber frame that looks more like a modern motorcycle than the squatty, golf-cart like tuk tuk. The ultra-lightweight materials mean it doesn't use as much energy as a heavy electric car. A photovoltaic skin helps charge the lithium batteries inside the vehicle, and it can also be plugged in. But the system itself—possibly even easier to use than current ride-sharing options—might be the part of the design most likely to attract riders.

tuk-tuk, tuk tuk, electric and 2 more...

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Deeq
Written by Deeq
With intense love for cars and bikes since little, and passion for photography, Siddiq tries hard to bring cars to life on the screen, proving his worth as well as his passion for the job.



 
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