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36 replies to this topic | 28 praises

#1

Posted 13 July 2017 - 05:15 PM

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wow, 1.6 T 201BHP and competing with Golf GTi.

 

Wonder if it will reach SG?

 

2018-Hyundai-Elantra-GT-front-three-quar



#2

Posted 13 July 2017 - 10:57 PM

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The Fastback looks great

 

 

 



#3

Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:59 AM

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Sweet...  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:  :wub:


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#4

Posted 14 July 2017 - 11:52 AM

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a even better looking Elantra that only the Australian gets is the 1.6 275BHP Elantra

 

 

 

i30N

 

 

 

https://youtu.be/2AGG3rZHUMw?t=14

 

 

 

vs concept

 

https://youtu.be/fYdD0kCs0xs?t=71

 


Edited by Sdf4786k, 14 July 2017 - 11:53 AM.

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#5

Posted 14 July 2017 - 02:07 PM

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Cant really compare, bigger CC for bigger countries. Here sg small, 50l tank already big. If horse power high, u pay much more, not according to cc.
If u get a 1.4cc car with 300 horse power, u dont pay according to 1.4cc tier. πŸ˜‚
Tats how sg works bro. See liao nice only, dont compare. Make u more happy too. πŸ˜‚

Edited by Orangee, 14 July 2017 - 02:07 PM.

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#6

Posted 14 July 2017 - 03:22 PM

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wow, 1.6 T 201BHP and competing with Golf GTi.

 

Wonder if it will reach SG?

 

2018-Hyundai-Elantra-GT-front-three-quar

 

 

Well you can always go over to Bolehland to test drive their super Elantra.

 

They have the same 200hp version as well

 

https://www.hyundai..../Elantra-sport/

 

Once again, who is is laughing now?



#7

Posted 14 July 2017 - 10:13 PM

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Korean horses have always proven to be skinnier and less capable than other countries' horses. A Kia K3 claims 127hp while a Swift Sport has 134hp, and a Golf has 120hp but the Kia does the 0-100 sprint in 12.1 secs, the Swift does it in 8.7 secs and the Golf manages to do it in 9.8 secs.



The gene pool could use a bit of Clorox at times

#8

Posted 15 July 2017 - 02:42 AM

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Elantra GT has been a long runner in European regions, since they love their hatchbacks...


Korean horses have always proven to be skinnier and less capable than other countries' horses. A Kia K3 claims 127hp while a Swift Sport has 134hp, and a Golf has 120hp but the Kia does the 0-100 sprint in 12.1 secs, the Swift does it in 8.7 secs and the Golf manages to do it in 9.8 secs.

 

Combination of weight and other technologies, the Swift is small and light, the K3 has a power-sapping auto-gearbox and the Golf has a DSG with turbocharger for earlier, stronger torque...


The Fastback looks great

 

It looks like it's not a hatch, instead a conventional sedan boot... if so that will hurt its practicality and appeal for the Europeans. It also looks like its trunk opening is gonna be really small...

 

But the overall shape and short rear deck makes it look gorgeous!


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#9

Posted 15 July 2017 - 09:16 AM

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Elantra GT has been a long runner in European regions, since they love their hatchbacks...


 

Combination of weight and other technologies, the Swift is small and light, the K3 has a power-sapping auto-gearbox and the Golf has a DSG with turbocharger for earlier, stronger torque...


It looks like it's not a hatch, instead a conventional sedan boot... if so that will hurt its practicality and appeal for the Europeans. It also looks like its trunk opening is gonna be really small...

 

But the overall shape and short rear deck makes it look gorgeous!

 

only thing here is the better car is the 1.4 turbo. But agent may not have the necessary skill set nor the equipment available to service it yet.The product manager of KoMo may also want to err on the safe side and cater to the ordinary "Cheap and good " profile buyer. So the draw to get the better siblings in may not necessary materialized.

 

Plus the fact that the conti rules the turbo world, the risk of stuck inventory is high.

 

Gone are the days of Ltd edition run to test the market as the homologation by LTA can take anything from 3months to 9 months, as that's what I was told.  

 

Way too much consideration. As a business man, you want chop chop curry pok , time to market the car, not academic exercise to risk a trial and error ... unlike previous years, what they did was to ship a pre production car over, gauge expectation, then go all out to get the sales when the customer placed an advance booking.



#10

Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:41 PM

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only thing here is the better car is the 1.4 turbo. But agent may not have the necessary skill set nor the equipment available to service it yet.The product manager of KoMo may also want to err on the safe side and cater to the ordinary "Cheap and good " profile buyer. So the draw to get the better siblings in may not necessary materialized.

Plus the fact that the conti rules the turbo world, the risk of stuck inventory is high.

Gone are the days of Ltd edition run to test the market as the homologation by LTA can take anything from 3months to 9 months, as that's what I was told.

Way too much consideration. As a business man, you want chop chop curry pok , time to market the car, not academic exercise to risk a trial and error ... unlike previous years, what they did was to ship a pre production car over, gauge expectation, then go all out to get the sales when the customer placed an advance booking.

That's an oversimplification of the situation...

Komoco is the authorized dealer... they will be supported by Hyundai Korea... which means the technicians will be trained to handle the turbo engine. It's not exactly very different from the usual engines they handle... so this is moot really...

Small petrol turbos were started by the Continental brands... but every brand in the market has their own similar turbo petrol engines... they have been around for some time... it's just that we're slow to get them... and for good reason...

There is no risk in the sense you're talking about... but there are a few issues... the first being pricing. A turbo engine is inevitably more expensive than a normally aspirated engine. With our tax structure, it stacks unfavorably for what is generally considered a bread and butter brand. Hence having to charge close to premium price just to make a decent profit might cause the sales volume to be below the expected. This is simply just badge mentality in Singapore.

The second issue is that Hyundai is moving away from the cheap and good image... in fact they're not in that category anymore. But the problem lies with the dealer... they will not change their marketing strategy unless pressed by Hyundai Korea or by the tax structure affecting their profits or by the emissions standard... the last I think will surely cause Hyundai to start bringing their small petrol turbos cos their naturally aspirated engines can't meet the Euro 6 standard. So this is more of the authorized dealer's problem... being too comfortable... case in point - VW took back the dealership and sell their cars themselves cos the previous dealer marked up too high and move too few cars... the previous dealer was content to earn fat profits from a few cars sold but did nothing to increase market share and brand awareness.

The third issue is Hyundai only has the 1.6 L turbo engine... they don't have anything smaller to compete in the compact category... the 1.6 L turbo competes with the 2.0 L NA Cat B cars. But the 1.4 L turbos from VW or 1.2 L turbos from Nissan or Peugeot compete with the 1.6 L Cat A cars. While the 1.0 L turbos from Ford competes in the below 1.4 L category of Cat A cars... in fact, being highly tuneable allows all these 3 capacity small petrol turbos to compete across the car segments from sub-compact to compact to mid-size. Hyundai can't compete cos they have enough of these engines in various capacities... so of course stick to what they have lar...
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#11

Posted 18 July 2017 - 01:37 PM

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Why do cars nowadays looks similar.. this looks like mazda 3 hatch leii..

#12

Posted 19 July 2017 - 08:52 AM

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That's an oversimplification of the situation...

Komoco is the authorized dealer... they will be supported by Hyundai Korea... which means the technicians will be trained to handle the turbo engine. It's not exactly very different from the usual engines they handle... so this is moot really...

Small petrol turbos were started by the Continental brands... but every brand in the market has their own similar turbo petrol engines... they have been around for some time... it's just that we're slow to get them... and for good reason...

There is no risk in the sense you're talking about... but there are a few issues... the first being pricing. A turbo engine is inevitably more expensive than a normally aspirated engine. With our tax structure, it stacks unfavorably for what is generally considered a bread and butter brand. Hence having to charge close to premium price just to make a decent profit might cause the sales volume to be below the expected. This is simply just badge mentality in Singapore.

The second issue is that Hyundai is moving away from the cheap and good image... in fact they're not in that category anymore. But the problem lies with the dealer... they will not change their marketing strategy unless pressed by Hyundai Korea or by the tax structure affecting their profits or by the emissions standard... the last I think will surely cause Hyundai to start bringing their small petrol turbos cos their naturally aspirated engines can't meet the Euro 6 standard. So this is more of the authorized dealer's problem... being too comfortable... case in point - VW took back the dealership and sell their cars themselves cos the previous dealer marked up too high and move too few cars... the previous dealer was content to earn fat profits from a few cars sold but did nothing to increase market share and brand awareness.

The third issue is Hyundai only has the 1.6 L turbo engine... they don't have anything smaller to compete in the compact category... the 1.6 L turbo competes with the 2.0 L NA Cat B cars. But the 1.4 L turbos from VW or 1.2 L turbos from Nissan or Peugeot compete with the 1.6 L Cat A cars. While the 1.0 L turbos from Ford competes in the below 1.4 L category of Cat A cars... in fact, being highly tuneable allows all these 3 capacity small petrol turbos to compete across the car segments from sub-compact to compact to mid-size. Hyundai can't compete cos they have enough of these engines in various capacities... so of course stick to what they have lar...

 

discussion only ..

it stacks unfavorably for what is generally considered a bread and butter brand.

 

Market has move .. Bread and butter like Mazda 3 and Corolla as well As Honda . Honda now have a Turbo charge car other then Mazda and Corolla. Market still sells in volume because of in build "ideology" turbo cars are laychey and has high fuel consumption. Hyundai sells in volume to Ah pek and those that have a tissue mentality.. use and throw convenience.

 

VW took back the dealership and sell their cars themselves cos the previous dealer marked up too high and move too few cars

 

The last dealer invested tons of money in building the new showroom. Obviously thats to have ROI. 

Who does not want to make money ? Skoda did not make it. Chrysler also was not making sales nor gel with the buyers in SG.

 

SEAT also belongs to VW. You would think they would also want to sell themselves if the market segment is there. Obviously there is a need to be established market and the demand is there.

 

If you were to rewind the tape to 2002. When ever the prices dipped for Passat, the volvo cars would fluatuate likewise, at least that what I observed. So the brand was making inroads as a competent player. Fast forward to today. If the CAT A was not complained by the rest of the market because they had no cars available to compete in the 1 to 1.6 category of turbo charge. Cars like BMW 116/118 and Golf Twin Charge 170 bhp will still rule the nest.


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#13

Posted 19 July 2017 - 10:52 AM

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discussion only ..
it stacks unfavorably for what is generally considered a bread and butter brand.

Market has move .. Bread and butter like Mazda 3 and Corolla as well As Honda . Honda now have a Turbo charge car other then Mazda and Corolla. Market still sells in volume because of in build "ideology" turbo cars are laychey and has high fuel consumption. Hyundai sells in volume to Ah pek and those that have a tissue mentality.. use and throw convenience.

VW took back the dealership and sell their cars themselves cos the previous dealer marked up too high and move too few cars

The last dealer invested tons of money in building the new showroom. Obviously thats to have ROI.
Who does not want to make money ? Skoda did not make it. Chrysler also was not making sales nor gel with the buyers in SG.

SEAT also belongs to VW. You would think they would also want to sell themselves if the market segment is there. Obviously there is a need to be established market and the demand is there.

If you were to rewind the tape to 2002. When ever the prices dipped for Passat, the volvo cars would fluatuate likewise, at least that what I observed. So the brand was making inroads as a competent player. Fast forward to today. If the CAT A was not complained by the rest of the market because they had no cars available to compete in the 1 to 1.6 category of turbo charge. Cars like BMW 116/118 and Golf Twin Charge 170 bhp will still rule the nest.

Actually the market remains the same... it's only belatedly that the Japanese and Korean brands have embraced small petrol turbos... the European brands have been pursuing turbo-charging to meet the more and more stringent emission standards. The Japanese opted for electrification. The European brands are of course still playing catch up. Back to Singapore, it's quite clear that the small petrol turbos are more expensive and they are also being marketed as being premium... the Civic turbo is clearly marketed as a premium model. It's way more expensive than the normally aspirated model. Toyota doesn't have a small petrol turbo to speak of. Mazda chose to pursue sky high compression ratios instead of turbo-charging and so they also don't have any viable alternatives. For Subaru, the turbo-charged models are all 2.0 turbos and have always been their special models and they cost way more... so whichever way you cut it, in Singapore having a turbo-charged engine results in premium prices... and for any bread and butter brands, quite clearly the market isn't ready to pay for these.

With regard to the Cat A fiasco where luxury car makers sneaked in small petrol turbos to corner the Cat A market... that's really moot... the current differences in COE prices hardly justify the excessive premiums over the non-turbo Japanese models.

Where possible I choose the most similar engine capacity for the turbo engines, and chosen the highest trim for the non-turbo engines to ensure that the feature sets aren't so different.

Civic 1.5 turbo - $131K
Audi A3 1.0 turbo - $135K
BMW 318i Sport - $175K
VW Jetta 1.4 turbo - $115K
VW Golf 1.4 turbo - $110K
Opel Astra 1.4 turbo - $121K
Ford Focus Sedan 1.0 turbo - $100K

And comparing to standard non-turbo models
Elantra 1.6 Elite - $95K
Corolla 1.6 Elegance - $106K
Civic 1.6 - $108K
Mazda 1.5 Deluxe - $100K
Slyphy 1.6 Signature - $106K

Quite clearly you see about a $10K premium if you buy a turbo-charged model from a bread and butter brand. I'm comparing Opel and VW. Only the Ford Focus sedan is comparable and even then it's a few thousand dollars more expensive with a much less powerful 1.0 turbo. The Civic is way off the graph.

And the revision to Cat A COEs to limit horsepower is the correct one. You can see from the prices that you're basically paying a very high premium for Audi, BMW and Mercedes (I didn't bother to include Mercedes)... Cat A are for bread and butter cars, not luxury marques... looking at top selling brands since the COE Cat A changes clearly show that the change has clearly little impact on the sales of BMW, Audi & Mercedes... the buyers in those segments still bought these brands whether they paid Cat A or B COEs... hence they should not compete for cheaper COEs in Cat A which is reserved for mainstream cars, not luxury models...

Also, it is quite clear that if all brands had small petrol turbos to compete in the Cat A segment, prices won't be as sky high as they are today... a clear example is set by VW, their 1.4 turbo cars aren't exorbitantly priced... the Hyundai Tucson 1.6 turbo is priced below $120K and that's a larger car segment compared to the category that we're discussing here... and Nissan has a 1.2 turbo thanks to their alliance with Renault, and the Qashqai isn't exorbitantly priced as well... so you can clearly see the pricing strategy of premium brands versus bread and butter brands... once there's competition, you've just got to tamper your profit margins... obviously Opel is asking for trouble with that kind of pricing. No wonder they're not profitable globally.

Luxury car brands have a lot of freedom to play around with pricing, COE premiums notwithstanding... just look at the sale prices versus the estimated car cost using SGCarmart... quite clearly the premium is hefty and sometimes up to $50K or more even for the entry level models... and so it was quite clear why VW decided to move in and takeover the dealership... their previous agent was clearly content to sell x numbers at a hefty $y premium for each car and still make lots of money but did nothing to expand market share. It's also very clear that once VW took over, the prices of all their models dipped significantly... it is also clear that VW views themselves as a mainstream brand at the upper end of the bracket whereas the previous dealer treated the brand as a premium one with pricing close to BMW, and Audi etc... and worse, having VW pricing so close to Audi messed up the VW group's strategy... the previous dealer was simply asking for it... VW's market share was pretty significant just before the diesel scandal... that's a lot more than what the previous dealer achieved...

The huge building that the previous VW agent built was premised on an assumed status quo which was pretty lazy I suppose... they just didn't read VW's intention... I'm sure there are frequent meetings to discuss sales targets and strategies...

Great discussion nevertheless... cheers!

Edited by teomingern, 19 July 2017 - 10:56 AM.

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#14

Posted 19 July 2017 - 11:15 AM

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Another example is the Subaru Levorg 1.6 turbo... the pricing is premium pricing at $131K...

#15

Posted 19 July 2017 - 12:23 PM

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Actually the market remains the same... it's only belatedly that the Japanese and Korean brands have embraced small petrol turbos... the European brands have been pursuing turbo-charging to meet the more and more stringent emission standards. The Japanese opted for electrification. The European brands are of course still playing catch up. Back to Singapore, it's quite clear that the small petrol turbos are more expensive and they are also being marketed as being premium... the Civic turbo is clearly marketed as a premium model. It's way more expensive than the normally aspirated model. Toyota doesn't have a small petrol turbo to speak of. Mazda chose to pursue sky high compression ratios instead of turbo-charging and so they also don't have any viable alternatives. For Subaru, the turbo-charged models are all 2.0 turbos and have always been their special models and they cost way more... so whichever way you cut it, in Singapore having a turbo-charged engine results in premium prices... and for any bread and butter brands, quite clearly the market isn't ready to pay for these.

 

Toyota does in fact have a small petrol turbo now in the form of the 1.2L turbo used by the C-HR.

Even Mazda has developed a SkyActiv turbo variant.

 

 

As for electrification, it seems that hybrids are even more ridiculously marked up than turbo cars. Look at the Prius or, if you can find one, a Camry hybrid. And those are also "leychey" to use Sdf4786k choice of word - worry about battery and whatever nonsense. 

Turbo technology has been refined over so many years to its current form and a turbo engine in practice doesn't require much else different - an oil change, check filters, etc., the same as a regular naturally aspirated engine. Sure the turbocharger needs to be checked once in a while and there's probably also a larger intercooler and so on, but I don't think it requires a lot more work for typical scenarios and turbocharging itself is rarely a point of failure.

In terms of petrol consumption the turbos can and will save on gas if driven in a way that best plays to their strengths, but a small turbo engine also hits certain limits - the proponents of the concept have already turned around and acknowledged that. Now the supposedly "ideal" engine for efficiency revolves around 500cc cylinders of a specific bore x stroke, sort of a golden ratio. Volvo's new line of engines use that design. I'm sure my 2.0L turbo is considered very thirsty by today's standards, but it produces more power while drinking less than a 1.6L from ages ago. A Mercedes C200 can get fuel efficiency that isn't far away from a Mazda3.


Edited by 7hm, 19 July 2017 - 12:25 PM.

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#16

Posted 19 July 2017 - 07:27 PM

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Ah... I stand corrected on the Toyota turbo... wasn't aware that Mazda has done a Skyactiv turbo... I guess they have to compete in the European market...

I'm quite sure these turbos are very reliable... so no issue with that aspect... and also they certainly save fuel comparing to a normally aspirated engine with similar horsepower and torque numbers.

But whether they are less polluting is still up in the air... but there is evidence pointing to more substantial pollution...

I think BMW also uses the same 500cc per cylinder theory for their engines...

#17

Posted 19 July 2017 - 08:11 PM

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Actually the market remains the same... it's only belatedly that the Japanese and Korean brands have embraced small petrol turbos... the European brands have been pursuing turbo-charging to meet the more and more stringent emission standards. The Japanese opted for electrification. The European brands are of course still playing catch up. Back to Singapore, it's quite clear that the small petrol turbos are more expensive and they are also being marketed as being premium... the Civic turbo is clearly marketed as a premium model. It's way more expensive than the normally aspirated model. Toyota doesn't have a small petrol turbo to speak of. Mazda chose to pursue sky high compression ratios instead of turbo-charging and so they also don't have any viable alternatives. For Subaru, the turbo-charged models are all 2.0 turbos and have always been their special models and they cost way more... so whichever way you cut it, in Singapore having a turbo-charged engine results in premium prices... and for any bread and butter brands, quite clearly the market isn't ready to pay for these.

With regard to the Cat A fiasco where luxury car makers sneaked in small petrol turbos to corner the Cat A market... that's really moot... the current differences in COE prices hardly justify the excessive premiums over the non-turbo Japanese models.

Where possible I choose the most similar engine capacity for the turbo engines, and chosen the highest trim for the non-turbo engines to ensure that the feature sets aren't so different.

Civic 1.5 turbo - $131K
Audi A3 1.0 turbo - $135K
BMW 318i Sport - $175K
VW Jetta 1.4 turbo - $115K
VW Golf 1.4 turbo - $110K
Opel Astra 1.4 turbo - $121K
Ford Focus Sedan 1.0 turbo - $100K

And comparing to standard non-turbo models
Elantra 1.6 Elite - $95K
Corolla 1.6 Elegance - $106K
Civic 1.6 - $108K
Mazda 1.5 Deluxe - $100K
Slyphy 1.6 Signature - $106K

Quite clearly you see about a $10K premium if you buy a turbo-charged model from a bread and butter brand. I'm comparing Opel and VW. Only the Ford Focus sedan is comparable and even then it's a few thousand dollars more expensive with a much less powerful 1.0 turbo. The Civic is way off the graph.

And the revision to Cat A COEs to limit horsepower is the correct one. You can see from the prices that you're basically paying a very high premium for Audi, BMW and Mercedes (I didn't bother to include Mercedes)... Cat A are for bread and butter cars, not luxury marques... looking at top selling brands since the COE Cat A changes clearly show that the change has clearly little impact on the sales of BMW, Audi & Mercedes... the buyers in those segments still bought these brands whether they paid Cat A or B COEs... hence they should not compete for cheaper COEs in Cat A which is reserved for mainstream cars, not luxury models...

Also, it is quite clear that if all brands had small petrol turbos to compete in the Cat A segment, prices won't be as sky high as they are today... a clear example is set by VW, their 1.4 turbo cars aren't exorbitantly priced... the Hyundai Tucson 1.6 turbo is priced below $120K and that's a larger car segment compared to the category that we're discussing here... and Nissan has a 1.2 turbo thanks to their alliance with Renault, and the Qashqai isn't exorbitantly priced as well... so you can clearly see the pricing strategy of premium brands versus bread and butter brands... once there's competition, you've just got to tamper your profit margins... obviously Opel is asking for trouble with that kind of pricing. No wonder they're not profitable globally.

Luxury car brands have a lot of freedom to play around with pricing, COE premiums notwithstanding... just look at the sale prices versus the estimated car cost using SGCarmart... quite clearly the premium is hefty and sometimes up to $50K or more even for the entry level models... and so it was quite clear why VW decided to move in and takeover the dealership... their previous agent was clearly content to sell x numbers at a hefty $y premium for each car and still make lots of money but did nothing to expand market share. It's also very clear that once VW took over, the prices of all their models dipped significantly... it is also clear that VW views themselves as a mainstream brand at the upper end of the bracket whereas the previous dealer treated the brand as a premium one with pricing close to BMW, and Audi etc... and worse, having VW pricing so close to Audi messed up the VW group's strategy... the previous dealer was simply asking for it... VW's market share was pretty significant just before the diesel scandal... that's a lot more than what the previous dealer achieved...

The huge building that the previous VW agent built was premised on an assumed status quo which was pretty lazy I suppose... they just didn't read VW's intention... I'm sure there are frequent meetings to discuss sales targets and strategies...

Great discussion nevertheless... cheers!

 

Just a note :

 

The actual Astra 1.0T is around $93k and 1.4T around $105k. For that price is very competitive in that segment with that amount of features and power.



#18

Posted 20 July 2017 - 10:29 AM

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Just a note :

The actual Astra 1.0T is around $93k and 1.4T around $105k. For that price is very competitive in that segment with that amount of features and power.

Thanks for the update bro... but I'm comparing list prices which don't reflect discounts since all brands give discounts for various reasons... so the difference in cost may still be about there...

#19

Posted 21 July 2017 - 01:12 PM

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Just a note :

 

The actual Astra 1.0T is around $93k and 1.4T around $105k. For that price is very competitive in that segment with that amount of features and power.

 

Wah say. $105k for 1.4T? MTL!!!


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#20

Posted 21 July 2017 - 01:48 PM

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Actually the market remains the same... it's only belatedly that the Japanese and Korean brands have embraced small petrol turbos... the European brands have been pursuing turbo-charging to meet the more and more stringent emission standards. The Japanese opted for electrification. The European brands are of course still playing catch up. Back to Singapore, it's quite clear that the small petrol turbos are more expensive and they are also being marketed as being premium... the Civic turbo is clearly marketed as a premium model. It's way more expensive than the normally aspirated model. Toyota doesn't have a small petrol turbo to speak of. Mazda chose to pursue sky high compression ratios instead of turbo-charging and so they also don't have any viable alternatives. For Subaru, the turbo-charged models are all 2.0 turbos and have always been their special models and they cost way more... so whichever way you cut it, in Singapore having a turbo-charged engine results in premium prices... and for any bread and butter brands, quite clearly the market isn't ready to pay for these.

With regard to the Cat A fiasco where luxury car makers sneaked in small petrol turbos to corner the Cat A market... that's really moot... the current differences in COE prices hardly justify the excessive premiums over the non-turbo Japanese models.

Where possible I choose the most similar engine capacity for the turbo engines, and chosen the highest trim for the non-turbo engines to ensure that the feature sets aren't so different.

Civic 1.5 turbo - $131K
Audi A3 1.0 turbo - $135K
BMW 318i Sport - $175K
VW Jetta 1.4 turbo - $115K
VW Golf 1.4 turbo - $110K
Opel Astra 1.4 turbo - $121K
Ford Focus Sedan 1.0 turbo - $100K

And comparing to standard non-turbo models
Elantra 1.6 Elite - $95K
Corolla 1.6 Elegance - $106K
Civic 1.6 - $108K
Mazda 1.5 Deluxe - $100K
Slyphy 1.6 Signature - $106K

Quite clearly you see about a $10K premium if you buy a turbo-charged model from a bread and butter brand. I'm comparing Opel and VW. Only the Ford Focus sedan is comparable and even then it's a few thousand dollars more expensive with a much less powerful 1.0 turbo. The Civic is way off the graph.

And the revision to Cat A COEs to limit horsepower is the correct one. You can see from the prices that you're basically paying a very high premium for Audi, BMW and Mercedes (I didn't bother to include Mercedes)... Cat A are for bread and butter cars, not luxury marques... looking at top selling brands since the COE Cat A changes clearly show that the change has clearly little impact on the sales of BMW, Audi & Mercedes... the buyers in those segments still bought these brands whether they paid Cat A or B COEs... hence they should not compete for cheaper COEs in Cat A which is reserved for mainstream cars, not luxury models...

Also, it is quite clear that if all brands had small petrol turbos to compete in the Cat A segment, prices won't be as sky high as they are today... a clear example is set by VW, their 1.4 turbo cars aren't exorbitantly priced... the Hyundai Tucson 1.6 turbo is priced below $120K and that's a larger car segment compared to the category that we're discussing here... and Nissan has a 1.2 turbo thanks to their alliance with Renault, and the Qashqai isn't exorbitantly priced as well... so you can clearly see the pricing strategy of premium brands versus bread and butter brands... once there's competition, you've just got to tamper your profit margins... obviously Opel is asking for trouble with that kind of pricing. No wonder they're not profitable globally.

Luxury car brands have a lot of freedom to play around with pricing, COE premiums notwithstanding... just look at the sale prices versus the estimated car cost using SGCarmart... quite clearly the premium is hefty and sometimes up to $50K or more even for the entry level models... and so it was quite clear why VW decided to move in and takeover the dealership... their previous agent was clearly content to sell x numbers at a hefty $y premium for each car and still make lots of money but did nothing to expand market share. It's also very clear that once VW took over, the prices of all their models dipped significantly... it is also clear that VW views themselves as a mainstream brand at the upper end of the bracket whereas the previous dealer treated the brand as a premium one with pricing close to BMW, and Audi etc... and worse, having VW pricing so close to Audi messed up the VW group's strategy... the previous dealer was simply asking for it... VW's market share was pretty significant just before the diesel scandal... that's a lot more than what the previous dealer achieved...

The huge building that the previous VW agent built was premised on an assumed status quo which was pretty lazy I suppose... they just didn't read VW's intention... I'm sure there are frequent meetings to discuss sales targets and strategies...

Great discussion nevertheless... cheers!

 

the occasional one off car like the Juke 1.6 turbo that past the 1601 CC mark and higher road tax is a nice and proper hoot to drive if you can forgive the CVT and the Look.

 

Waiting for Hyundai Kona to come in to see if it will be a Audi A2 competitor or not.




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