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  • Featured Stories

    Construction on Jurong Region Line to start next year

    Construction works for five stations on the new Jurong Region Line (JRL) are expected to start next year and slated for completion in 2026. The five stations are Choa Chu Kang, Choa Chu Kang West, Tengah, Hong Kah and Corporation, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said yesterday. The authority has awarded two contracts worth $739.5 million to construct the five MRT stations. The stations will form part of JRL, Singapore's seventh MRT line, which is set to open in three stages from 2026. Comprising 24 stations, the line was announced last year to improve connectivity in the Jurong area, with the aim of boosting the area's transformation into a second Central Business District.

    SGCM_editorial

    SGCM_editorial

    Toyota/BMW partnership not as easy as thought

    Toyota and BMW’s partnership was first formed in 2012 but until recently, the Supra and the Z4 are the first cars to come out from the collaboration.   According to Road and Track which interviewed the Chief Engineer of the upcoming Toyota Supra, Tetsuya Tada, said that the two companies took two years to hash out their differences.   It didn't help that the collaboration between Toyota and BMW is also quite different to the partnership with Subaru which produced the 86 and the BRZ.   “We have quite a lot of differences in the terms of the way we make cars. The philosophies of the companies, as well as the mentality of Japanese people and German people are quite different. In that sense, we had to overcome a lot of differences,” Tada san said.   “When we worked with Subaru, we started out with the aim of having as many common parts as possible between the 86 and BRZ. When we initially approached BMW, we thought it would also be aiming to have as much common parts as possible. But they had quite an unexpected reaction initially, saying ‘there’s no point in having as many common parts as possible if we cannot make a car that we each want. So we decided to first have a firm idea of what we, individually, wanted to make, and based on that, we approached each other and compared to see where we could have common parts,” said Tada san.

    Faiming_low

    Faiming_low

    Is this the new hardcore Aventador SVJ?

    After a leaked photo of the latest Aventador's instrument display surfaced, a photo of how the car might look like has appeared online too.   According to Carscoops, the will be available in roadster and coupe versions.   Dubbed Aventador SVJ which stands for Super Veloce Jotta, the lamborghini will be equipped with the four-wheel steering system of the Centenario, the ALA active aerodynamics of the Huracan Performante and the magnetorheological suspension of the Aventador SV.   Beside also being lighter, the car is said to be able to match or surpass its Ferrari V12 rival, the 812 Superfast. This means that it should have more than 790bhp from its naturally-aspirated V12.

    Faiming_low

    Faiming_low

    Drivers, behold 'Points', the internet-enabled digital street sign

    You know, asking for directions is inevitable if you are driving around a place you aren't that familiar with. Unfortunately, doing it over and over again may somehow become quite an annoyance and it'll feel tiring, too. This is probably why street signs were built in the first place. However, street signs are not always easy to read, especially if you are driving at night. In order to see what is written on a street sign at night, it is often the case that drivers have to slow down their car or even pull over and take a close look at the sign.   Nevertheless, thanks to the evolution of digital technologies these days, drivers may no longer have to deal with such cases as mentioned earlier. This is especially true if the countries in the world finally start using 'Points'. It's a digital street sign developed by Breakfast Products. It took the company no less than three years to be able to build such an impressive device. Yet, the result is, well, quite impressive indeed if the sign works just as it's advertised.   'Points' has a pole that is about as tall as a human being where it displays a five-segment interface menu. This menu is continuously updated by utilising an internet connection. This digital street sign fetches data from a number of onboard sensors in addition to social networks such as Foursquare, Twitter, and even RSS feeds, among others.   Then, based on the data, 'Points' will display information on its three directional arms. Seeing the directional arms in motion, I believe some of you may wonder if the electrical wires inside them will be tangled. Well, as Breakfast Products takes advantage of rotary electrical interfaces and micro transmissions (consisting of 11 gears as well as multiple motors), tangled wires are really nothing to worry about in the case of 'Points'. As a matter of fact, the arms can swing smoothly up to 360 degrees regardless of how bad the temperature or weather may be at any given time.   Additionally, this digital street sign also uses a processor which can remain cool most of the time, preventing the power from being drained quickly. Oh yeah, did I mention that 'Points' is mostly made of aluminium? Aluminium is chosen for the sake of durability and strength in a diverse set of environments.   Earlier, I mentioned that drivers would possibly no longer have to slow down or pull over to read street signs, didn't I? Well, this is very possible because 'Points' utilises over 16,000 ultra-efficient and super bright LEDs. So, even during the night, you'll be able to clearly see what's displayed on this particular digital street sign. Although 'Points' is made in America, hopefully it makes its way here to Singapore as well.  

    RchLuvSlly

    RchLuvSlly

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