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Hyundai Australia replaces i45 with i40 sedan

Hyundai Australia replaces i45 with i40 sedan

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Hyundai Motor Company Australia has removed the i45 (above) from its lineup and replaced it with the European-styled i40 sedan.

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The i40 features Hyundai's 'fluidic sculpture' design language, and was launched in Europe initially as an estate with a saloon due later in 2011.

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Hyundai Australia

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