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Chevy's new Z06 Corvette Stingray produces some amazing numbers

Chevy's new Z06 Corvette Stingray produces some amazing numbers

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chitchatboy

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blogentry-133713-0-30326000-1412217270_thumb.jpgHow a century sprint timing of 3 seconds and a quarter-mile run of 10.95 seconds sound to you? Yup, that's how fast GM's new Z06 Corvette is when paired with its eight-speed automatic. The seven-speed manual will do the above two runs in a slightly slower 3.3 seconds and 11.2 seconds respectively. Still not too shabby I guess!

 

blogentry-133713-0-23231500-1412217328_thumb.jpgIt shouldn't be when you have a supercharged 6.2-litre V8 pushing 650bhp and 880Nm of torque. GM says the Z06 is also very good at stopping with them claiming it having 'the best braking performance of any production car it has ever tested'. It comes to a stop from 96km/h in 30.36 meters if you are wondering.

 

blogentry-133713-0-60071900-1412217306_thumb.jpgSo it goes and stop very well. How about turning then? The Z06 is claimed to be able to achieve 1.2g in the corners and again, GM says it is 'its fastest production car ever tested at its own Milford Road Course, beating the record set by the Corvette ZR1 by one whole second'.

 

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If I lived in the US, one of my cars would definitely be a Corvette.

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If I lived in the US, I still don't think i can afford one.

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If I lived in the US, I would definitely buy a coupe and a topless Corvette.

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Just checked the US price. About 80K USD. Wah Lao. This only costs the same as a stupid Altis now. I'm gonna move to US if sg eventually gets f**ked up.

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This one got RHD or not? If got I sure buy. Haha!

 

GM's CEO did promise building RHD C7 Corvettes but till now there is still no sign of it. So I guess you shouldn't put your hopes too high for the Z06 too.

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Just checked the US price. About 80K USD. Wah Lao. This only costs the same as a stupid Altis now. I'm gonna move to US if sg eventually gets f**ked up.

Really cheap....In S'pore,cannot even buy a Mazda 3 'based' model..

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Just checked the US price. About 80K USD. Wah Lao. This only costs the same as a stupid Altis now. I'm gonna move to US if sg eventually gets f**ked up.

 

"Eventually gets"? :D

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"Eventually gets"? :D

 

Well if they decide to implement the distance based ERP, then that's when i'll probably move. For now, the situation is still tolerable. We all have different definitions of what is tolerable.

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Really cheap....In S'pore,cannot even buy a Mazda 3 'based' model..

 

Only Singaporeans will say it is cheap. This is because of our perception of what is affordable.

 

Most Americans won't be able to afford it there. Even if they do, they'll be in massive debt. Over there, car dealers offer all kinds of weird financing schemes just so that people can get a new car. In fact such ads are all over the radio.

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If I lived in the US, I'll buy.... the Charger SRT Hellcat. 707hp supercharged HEMI, room for 5 adults and a useable boot.
If I want a coupe, it's gonna be this Z06 or HPE700 Mustang.

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I'm not married with kids so I don't care for practicality.

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For those griping about the cost there vs here. Note that if you lived in the US. You would probably pay 10-30k more per year in taxes (if you are in the income bracket for such cars). That 10-30k over 10 years (using COE lifespan), well that makes up for your more expensive SG car.

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