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BYD debuts the Tang SUV

BYD debuts the Tang SUV

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chitchatboy

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blogentry-133713-0-76881500-1422350503_thumb.jpgChina manufacturer, BYD, has just introduced its Tang, one of the fastest SUVs around with a total output of 505bhp and 720Nm. And it can do 50km/L.

 

blogentry-133713-0-26131700-1422350508_thumb.jpgYes, this is a hybrid. A very fast one actually. For sale only in China, the Tang gets its huge output from the combination of a 2.0-litre turbo petrol which puts out 205bhp and two electric motors that produce 150bhp each. Power is then channelled to each wheel via a six-speed automatic transmission.

 

blogentry-133713-0-07537400-1422350526_thumb.jpgLike most hybrids, the Tang has a different driving modes that allows the driver to choose between an electric only mode or a mix of both electric plus the assistance of the petrol engine. Four modes are available with the all electric only mode driving only the rear wheels via the rear motor. A range extender mode is next up with it using the petrol engine to charge the both the front and rear electric motors. Drive goes to the rear wheels only in this mode.

 

blogentry-133713-0-40394700-1422350543_thumb.jpgThe third mode then switches the car into hybrid mode, with drive going only to the front wheels via the help of both the front electric motor and the petrol engine. Lastly, a maximum attack mode uses both electric motors and the petrol engine to summon drive to all four wheels for all-out forward thrust.

 

blogentry-133713-0-16118700-1422350535_thumb.jpgNeed even more power? A limited edition of the Tang, the Tang Ultimate, is available with a host of performance upgrade which in turn sees the century sprint timing dropping to 4.4 seconds from the original's 4.9 seconds. Now that is pretty fast.

 

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blogentry-133713-0-90763000-1422350552_thumb.jpg

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Still copying Jap car designs?? Looks like a Toyota Harrier to me... haiz...

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Well, people only know how to criticize, and being too judgmental. Sad!

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Car looks good and specs great too on paper. Some people haven't seen, tried or even feel the car but can criticise. Machiam so clever like that. Well, when one assume it does means something.

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Well, people only know how to criticize, and being too judgmental. Sad!

will u wat to buy it?

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will u wat to buy it?

If the quality is there why not? I will buy if it is available and affordable for me, but this car is not cheap. It cost RMB$ 300,000 to 600,000.

 

Normal Chinese SUV only cost RMB$ 70,000 to 150,000

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Use of wheel vehicle started in China, why KIA , BMW, Toyota and all other car borrow the design of China ancient wheel vehicle•••••

Cannot understand•••••••••

个:D

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Use of wheel vehicle started in China, why KIA , BMW, Toyota and all other car borrow the design of China ancient wheel vehicle••••• Cannot understand••••••••• 个:D

Haha, but even that is not really true. First use of wheels on vehicles is dated to 4th Millennium BC in Mesopotamia. The oldest securely dated wheel-axle combination is 3000+BC in Slovenia, so that's definitely "ang moh land". China is more like 2000BC, earliest.

 

Disclaimer: All facts from Professor Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheel

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If the quality is there why not? I will buy if it is available and affordable for me, but this car is not cheap. It cost RMB$ 300,000 to 600,000.

 

Normal Chinese SUV only cost RMB$ 70,000 to 150,000

seriously with that price range, arent there better cars??

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Well, people only know how to criticize, and being too judgmental. Sad!

 

Perhaps that's because China has gained some undeniable bad press internationally about openly copying designs of other cars (like the X5, Range Rover Evoque, Rolls Royce etc) in addition to other consumer goods such as Mulberry Alexa bags, shirts etc.

 

Heck, there's even a crackdown on taobao where goods sold online may have a 50% chance of being counterfeit. My bias opinion would unfortunately remain until they learn to start respecting international copyright laws / proprietary rights.

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Perhaps that's because China has gained some undeniable bad press internationally about openly copying designs of other cars (like the X5, Range Rover Evoque, Rolls Royce etc) in addition to other consumer goods such as Mulberry Alexa bags, shirts etc.

 

Heck, there's even a crackdown on taobao where goods sold online may have a 50% chance of being counterfeit. My bias opinion would unfortunately remain until they learn to start respecting international copyright laws / proprietary rights.

This problem will not solve any soon due to the huge population and most remain poor.

Copying other people design or work is always happen at the begining stage. But we can start to see that their new product had already added some of their design and technology.

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This problem will not solve any soon due to the huge population and most remain poor. The market force is there.

Copying other people design or work is always happen at the begining stage. But we can start to see that their new product had already added some of their design and technology.

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This problem will not solve any soon due to the huge population and most remain poor.

Copying other people design or work is always happen at the begining stage. But we can start to see that their new product had already added some of their design and technology.

 

Yes, I must say that you have a valid point & they definitely need to start somewhere. 2015 is not a bad year for the Chinese auto makers to start charting their own path. Who knows? They may be as good or even better than the current car makers one day (Euros/Americans/Japs/Koreans) + their own domestic market is huge too.

 

On paper, the specs of this ride certainly looks like a beast. Hope it performs as well on the roads in China.

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