Jump to content

Tesla to close down most retail stores

Tesla to close down most retail stores

Sign in to follow this  
Faiming_low

520 views

Tesla has announced that it will close down most of its retail outlets in a move that will allow it to price its cars cheaper.

 

According to Electrek, the electric car maker wants to focus on online sales as it says that 78% of the Model 3 orders the company received last year were placed online. Interestingly, it added on that 82% of Model 3 customers purchased the vehicle without test driving first.

 

With that in mind, the company believes that there was no need to operate the 120 retail store that it has now and will be closing most of it down. Doing so will allow it to reduce prices for its vehicles by an average of 6% and give it the ability to produce the entry-level Model 3 earlier than anticipated.

 

Furthermore, it has been reported that Tesla started removing commissions from retail employees earned from sales, prompting employees to speculate that the manufacturer has cut bonuses to try and push them out before Tesla needs to layoff staff and pay severance.

Sign in to follow this  


2 Comments


Recommended Comments

When a company tells you it's closing its stores so it can sell its products more cheaply, you know that's BS.

 

Online sales will never be the same as a proper dealership experience when it comes to things like cars. You need to sit inside, poke around, drive around.

 

Tesla is in money trouble. It's that simple.

Share this comment


Link to comment

When a company tells you it's closing its stores so it can sell its products more cheaply, you know that's BS.

 

Online sales will never be the same as a proper dealership experience when it comes to things like cars. You need to sit inside, poke around, drive around.

 

Tesla is in money trouble. It's that simple.

 

I wonder if they would also cut some corners on the production floor to save some moolah.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Featured Stories

    BMW Alpina B5: Comfortable Cruiser

    Who says performance cars need to come with a sporty ride? Last week we tested the BMW Alpina B5 to see if Alpina's take on the performance saloon is a viable alternative to the BMW M5. So what sets this Alpina apart? Firstly, the interior has received a host of luxurious touches to set it apart from the regular 5 series: The digital dashboard in the B5 has its own Alpina-specific design and colour scheme, for example, while the handcrafted Alpina steering wheel is made of Lavalina leather (the same leather used in Rolls-Royce cars), and features blue/green stitching. But what truly sets this car apart from the rest of the performance saloon pack is what is underneath you: With a suspension designed to deliver comfort and refinement in spades, the Alpina is not just comfortable, but sublimely comfortable. Adding to the comfortable cruise is the fact that the B5 is joyously easy-going to drive, with the lightest of pressure on the accelerator sending the car wafting rapidly down the road. With the abundance of humps and rumble strips on our local roads, would Alpina's take on the performance saloon, with its effortless and classy character, be a better suit for your everyday commute? Read our full review here!

    SGCM_editorial

    SGCM_editorial

    Lexus crafts working IS sedan out of cardboard with stunning details

    There has never been a Lexus like it: sheet metal, glass and plastics have been set aside for the creation of a one-off life-size model crafted in precision-cut cardboard. The remarkable Lexus Origami Car is a faithful replica of the new IS saloon, produced as a celebration of the human craftsmanship skills that go into every car Lexus makes.   The skilled men and women – known as takumi – who work on the Lexus production lines, hone their dexterity skills by learning how to fold paper into an origami model cat, using only their non-dominant hand. The Origami Car takes the spirit of this talent to a far higher level, while also embracing the spirit of Lexus's Creating Amazing global brand campaign.   The Origami Car has a fully fitted interior, functioning doors, headlights and rolling wheels. Thanks to an electric motor mounted on its steel and aluminium frame, it can even be driven. In terms of size and complexity, the project was an unprecedented undertaking for LaserCut Works and Scales and Models, UK-based specialist companies with extensive experience in the design and creation of prototypes, architectural models and bespoke commissions.   Ruben Marcos, Scales and Models Company founder and director explained: "This was a very demanding job, with five people involved in the digital design, modelling, laser cutting and assembly. Just like Lexus, we were committed to producing the best possible quality."   The creative process presented the team with a series of tough challenges: "The seats took a few attempts to get just right and the wheels required a lot of refining. Once we could see the physical pieces taking shape, we could identify where we needed to make improvements – as with anything, there were some elements of trial and error, but as we had all the resources we needed in-house, this made the changes easier to produce."   Lexus provided the team with a digital 3D model of the IS, which was then divided into a series of principal parts, such as the main body, dashboard, seats and wheels. These were then digitally rendered in 10mm "slices" to provide the two-dimensional profiles needed for the laser cutting of each of the 1,700 sheets of 10mm-thick of cardboard – supplied by packaging experts DS Smith. Each layer was given its own reference number to help ensure it was assembled in the right sequence and the entire assembly was done by hand. A water-based/wood glue was used, which had to be left to set for 10 minutes after each application. Accuracy was vital, as changes couldn't be made once the glue had dried. In all, the Origami Car took three months to build.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F7DnWAhox8  

    Deeq

    Deeq

    Hit the racing tracks with your own racer replicas

    Fans of vintage racing cars would be familiar with racing cars such as the Porsche 917, Ford GT40 and the Lola T70. And most fans of these racing cars could only dream of driving them as the real thing could cost you a lot of money.   But now you can stop dreaming and obtain one of these racing cars at a fraction of the price of a real one. South African firm, Bailey Cars, builds replicas of classic racing cars and they have set up shop in North America so fans can fulfil their dreams of owning such racers.   Prices ranging from US$83,000 for a Lola T70 to US$103,300 for a Ferrari P4, excluding shipping. You could say that the prices are not that really cheap but considering that they are still much cheaper than buying the real thing and they are built using modern engineering techniques.   Each car is built on a modern tube frame chassis. Engine and transmission is based on a customer

    FaezClutchless

    FaezClutchless

×