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Supercharged
1 hour ago, inlinesix said:

 

All of them fell short of their stated range. Worse still, some of them can't even be pushed for a few metres when their batteries are totally depleted. Its not helping consumers feel less "range anxious".

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Supersonic
5 hours ago, Toeknee_33 said:

All of them fell short of their stated range. Worse still, some of them can't even be pushed for a few metres when their batteries are totally depleted. Its not helping consumers feel less "range anxious".

There is a caveat from the start of the video, the test was done in sub-optimal weather.

 

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Supercharged
19 hours ago, inlinesix said:

There is a caveat from the start of the video, the test was done in sub-optimal weather.

 

7 degrees C was the average UK temp anyway, so the test was done at a representative temp. Also the optimum temp for batt efficiency is 15-25 degrees C. So the actual range will yet again fall short in hotter climates.

So EVs cold cannot, hot also cannot 😅 

Personally, I don't think EV and range anxiety is for me. Lack of charging facilities aside (which may improve over time), an EV robs me of freedom - the ability to go anywhere at any time at a moment's notice, without having to plan for re-charging. Also, trips up north, though not impossible, will be too daunting.

To me, HEVs are closer to ICE-vehicles.

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5th Gear

Nissan came out with e-power.

It resolves range anxiety. Also don't need charging facility.

For the above 2 benefits, you'll need some petrol in the tank. Otherwise, it drives like a EV.

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Supercharged (edited)
22 hours ago, Didu said:

Nissan came out with e-power.

It resolves range anxiety. Also don't need charging facility.

For the above 2 benefits, you'll need some petrol in the tank. Otherwise, it drives like a EV.

Yup it resolves range anxiety.

However, to my mind, it's a bit oxymoronic to use fuel to power a generator to make electricity which is then stored in a battery and then sent the electric motor to finally power the wheels.

Process: Chemical (fuel) to mechanical (generator) to electricity to chemical (battery) to electricity to mechanical (motor). 

I'm no scientist but surely the numerous conversion to different forms of energy can't be too energy efficient.

Conceptually the BMW i3 and i8, where it's a plug-in EV with a ICE range extender on board, seems like a better idea. 

Edited by Toeknee_33
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Twincharged

My friend in KL bought a BMW plug in hybrid, hardly need to top up petrol these days, This will probably be the transition technology till more charging stations are build.

MY tax rebate for EV vehicles are really generous. SG is hardly doing anything to encourage plug in hybrid and taxing full EV to death. How can a Tesla pays more road tax than a Ferrari?  It is mind boggling. Maybe G is betting on hydrogen?

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Supercharged
2 minutes ago, Voodooman said:

My friend in KL bought a BMW plug in hybrid, hardly need to top up petrol these days, This will probably be the transition technology till more charging stations are build.

MY tax rebate for EV vehicles are really generous. SG is hardly doing anything to encourage plug in hybrid and taxing full EV to death. How can a Tesla pays more road tax than a Ferrari?  It is mind boggling. Maybe G is betting on hydrogen?

Yes MY PHEV are cheaper than their petrol only counterparts due to rebates and CKD status. If one has the means to plugs in everyday, 30km commutes should be fuel-free. Good idea.

However, if you can't do plug in re-charging, and buy because of the low sticker prices, then actually the FC is worse then a fossil-fueled car because of the extra 200-300kg of batteries you lug around all day. Dont know if the extra fuel costs will be worth it in the long run.

I have always felt that EV is an interim technology before HEVs becomes mainstream. An EV recharging network may become a white elephant when that day comes. 

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Supersonic
1 hour ago, Toeknee_33 said:

Yes MY PHEV are cheaper than their petrol only counterparts due to rebates and CKD status. If one has the means to plugs in everyday, 30km commutes should be fuel-free. Good idea.

However, if you can't do plug in re-charging, and buy because of the low sticker prices, then actually the FC is worse then a fossil-fueled car because of the extra 200-300kg of batteries you lug around all day. Dont know if the extra fuel costs will be worth it in the long run.

I have always felt that EV is an interim technology before HEVs becomes mainstream. An EV recharging network may become a white elephant when that day comes. 

Most of these cars are SKD. The saving on excess duty is not a lot due to low local content. It’s the tax rebate that push the cost down.

Nissan Leaf cost RM190k. The only tax is Sales & Service Tax.

Hydrogen cost more than electric now. It’s about the same per KM as ICE. It address the issue of range anxiety.

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Supersonic
2 hours ago, Toeknee_33 said:

Yup it resolves range anxiety.

However, to my mind, it's a bit oxymoronic to use fuel to power a generator to make electricity which is then stored in a battery and then sent the electric motor to finally power the wheels.

Process: Chemical (fuel) to mechanical (generator) to electricity to chemical (battery) to electricity to mechanical (motor). 

I'm no scientist but surely the numerous conversion to different forms of energy can't be too energy efficient.

Conceptually the BMW i3 and i8, where it's a plug-in EV with a ICE range extender on board, seems like a better idea. 

i8 is a hybrid sports car.

i3 is an EV unless REX is added.

 

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Supercharged
41 minutes ago, inlinesix said:

i8 is a hybrid sports car.

i3 is an EV unless REX is added.

 

Yes you are quite right on both counts. 

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Hypersonic
8 hours ago, Toeknee_33 said:

Yup it resolves range anxiety.

However, to my mind, it's a bit oxymoronic to use fuel to power a generator to make electricity which is then stored in a battery and then sent the electric motor to finally power the wheels.

Process: Chemical (fuel) to mechanical (generator) to electricity to chemical (battery) to electricity to mechanical (motor). 

I'm no scientist but surely the numerous conversion to different forms of energy can't be too energy efficient.

Conceptually the BMW i3 and i8, where it's a plug-in EV with a ICE range extender on board, seems like a better idea. 

Its all about emissions now. Most modern ships are operated this way nowadays. Huge electric motors are the ones driving the propeller, not the engine. It is far more emission and fuel efficient. 

I dont own such car before so cant tell if it is the same as the modern ship, better emissions and fuel efficient. 

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Neutral Newbie

The chances success for electric cars are very high. Tesla is positioning their company starting at the top end and working down. Other companies are offering electric cars and bikes at different levels. For example Renault have given the world the Twizy right at the low end and Nissan have been gradually improving the range of the Leaf which is at the mid. The industry will be made up of traditional car (head gasket fix) makers realising it makes sense to invest heavily in electric, like Porsche have just done, and smaller startups finding areas where electric vehicles can make a difference, such as electric scooters that can be charged by solar in remote places for developing countries. Once upon a time there where more electric vehicles on the streets of some english cities than petrol, then petrol won out. Now there is a steady increase in electric vehicle use which has yet to reach a point of rapid change but is moving towards that point.

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Neutral Newbie
On 2/5/2020 at 10:43 AM, carey402547 said:

The chances success for electric cars are very high. Tesla is positioning their company starting at the top end and working down. Other companies are offering electric cars and bikes at different levels. For example Renault have given the world the Twizy right at the low end and Nissan have been gradually improving the range of the Leaf which is at the mid. The industry will be made up of traditional car (yellow wildflowers) makers realising it makes sense to invest heavily in electric, like Porsche have just done, and smaller startups finding areas where electric vehicles can make a difference, such as electric scooters that can be charged by solar in remote places for developing countries. Once upon a time there where more electric vehicles on the streets of some english cities than petrol, then petrol won out. Now there is a steady increase in electric vehicle use which has yet to reach a point of rapid change but is moving towards that point.

i totally agree 100%

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5th Gear

It's not a complete EV ownership picture now. Whats the 2nd hand value of EV going to be like?How convenient is it going to have the vehicle charged? It's not going to be a 5 min stop over at current petrol station. Will it cost as much as current petrol? Will charging price fluctuate along with oil price?  Overall I think charging cost might be the lowest for landed property owners. Just plug into home power supply over night.

Until it's clearer, only the rich might take the plunge.

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Supersonic
10 minutes ago, Didu said:

It's not a complete EV ownership picture now. Whats the 2nd hand value of EV going to be like?How convenient is it going to have the vehicle charged? It's not going to be a 5 min stop over at current petrol station. Will it cost as much as current petrol? Will charging price fluctuate along with oil price?  Overall I think charging cost might be the lowest for landed property owners. Just plug into home power supply over night.

Until it's clearer, only the rich might take the plunge.

SP Power is expanding its network. Check SP Power app.

I don’t have SP Power rate. Based on Shell rate of $0.55, it cost $35.20 to full charge Hyundai Kona.

It translates to 9.1cents/km (after 20% disc on WLTP range).

Try to beat it.

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5th Gear
12 hours ago, Didu said:

It's not a complete EV ownership picture now. Whats the 2nd hand value of EV going to be like?How convenient is it going to have the vehicle charged? It's not going to be a 5 min stop over at current petrol station. Will it cost as much as current petrol? Will charging price fluctuate along with oil price?  Overall I think charging cost might be the lowest for landed property owners. Just plug into home power supply over night.

Until it's clearer, only the rich might take the plunge.

The cheapest EV now in SG market is the MG ZS EV. At 120k is around reasonable though still not within the 100k mark yet

Taking this for example,
One charge able to go around 300km. With a 44kW battery using a DC fast charge at 50kWh means 0-100 in around 40-50mins.

I stay east side and there is free charging at Tampines Hub at 7.6KWh. If i go there for lunch and charge 2hours easily I can get 15kW which works out to roughly 100KM? more than enough for daily travelling a few days around town. I work near and do mostly city driving so it works out to be worth it. Furthermore Tampines Hub have free 2 hours parking during lunch😀 ... However there is no free lunch forever though.

So the nearest SP Fast charge is at Autobacs Ubi currently or Kaki bukit area for the east. Current rate DC50 at $0.48/kwh which still works out $21 for a full 300km. 😃 While charging can do enjoy a cup of free coffee, albeit not the most satisfying.

Habits have to change I think. Right now we go petrol station to specifically pump. But with BEV we are actually charging while doing other stuff like shopping and having a meal. Is not time-wasting charging when you are actually doing something concurrently. Then again choice of going where will then be dependent on the the charging stations.

 

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