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Man Jailed for Abetting 'Scapegoats' for Traffic Offences

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traffic offences scapegoating has become a 'business'? :huh:

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Man jailed for abetting 'scapegoats' to take the rap for traffic offences

by Kimberly Spykerman Updated 04:22 PM Nov 20, 2012

 

SINGAPORE - Seah Hock Thiam, who once championed the Yellow Ribbon Project, which helps reformed offenders start afresh, was today jailed six weeks for abetting his driver to get someone to take the rap for his friends' traffic offences.

 

Seah, who is the chairman of several companies, including Esun International, is also an ambassador for the Industrial & Services Co-operative Society. Industrial & Services Co-operative Society is one of the agencies that started the Yellow Ribbon Project.

 

The 45-year-old instigated his driver, Mr Mohamad Azmi Abdul Wahab, in August 2009 to engage two "scapegoats" - Salami Badrus and Rosniwati Jumani - to assume criminal liability for parking offences that were committed by his friends, Mr Ho Ah Huat and Mr Ong Pang Aik.

 

The offences each carried a S$120 fine and three demerit points.

 

Mr Ho is the former chief executive of Scorpio East Entertainment, while Mr Ong is the chairman and managing director of construction firm Lian Beng Group.

 

Seah claimed trial in July 2012.

 

During the trial, Seah's driver, Mohamad Azmi testified that Seah had asked him to "settle" the traffic offences. He said he agreed to help because Seah had been "very supportive" of him as his employer.

 

Each of the 'scapegoats' was paid about S$300.

 

In meting out the sentence, the district judge noted features of Seah's case that distinguished itself from the case involving prominent plastic surgeon Woffles Wu Tze Liang.

 

In June, Wu was ordered to pay the maximum fine of S$1,000 for getting an elderly employee to take the rap for him for a speeding offence. The 52-year-old had abetted Mr Kuan Kit Wah, then 76, to provide false information to the police.

 

The judge noted that in Wu's case, there was no indication that any monetary rewards had been given by him, whereas in Seah's case, he had paid money to the "scapegoats".

 

Also, Wu had pleaded guilty, whereas Seah, who faced more serious charges, claimed trial.

 

The judge added: "The offences in this case undermine the points demerit system... A deterrent sentence is called for to deter others from committing the same offence."

 

However, the judge noted that Seah's contributions to charitable organisations and community work were taken into consideration in sentencing.

 

Seah's lawyer told the court that he will file an appeal.

 

He could have been jailed up to seven years and fined for each charge.

CHANNEL NEWSASIA/TODAY

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Why the recent famous doctor who asked someone to take the rap was not jailed then ?

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Turbocharged

Why the recent famous doctor who asked someone to take the rap was not jailed then ?

Judge says whether scapegoat is paid is a factor!! :o:wacko:

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Turbocharged

Bec yellow ribbon is not the same as white panties.

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Bec yellow ribbon is not the same as white panties.

 

*LIKE !!! [laugh]

 

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Moderator

Why the recent famous doctor who asked someone to take the rap was not jailed then ?

 

 

court case recent but offend was more than 2 years ago, where the new law not effective yet, so he is not guilty lor :D

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Twincharged

It's strange....it's an offence that carried a $120 fine and 3 demerit points....one friend drives a porker and the other a Maserati.....can't be they can't afford to pay. Also read that they became persecution's witnesses.....perhaps they were not aware of the scapegoats thingy or came clean by pointing out the person who carried out the plan. So not worth it.....should have either appealed the parking offence or just paid up and accept the consequences of demerit points....just my personal thoughts.

 

 

Safe ride.

Cheers

  • Praise 1

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Moderator

It's strange....it's an offence that carried a $120 fine and 3 demerit points....one friend drives a porker and the other a Maserati.....can't be they can't afford to pay. Also read that they became persecution's witnesses.....perhaps they were not aware of the scapegoats thingy or came clean by pointing out the person who carried out the plan. So not worth it.....should have either appealed the parking offence or just paid up and accept the consequences of demerit points....just my personal thoughts.

 

 

Safe ride.

Cheers

 

 

these 富豪 are like that one, like to command people to 'settle'

thing for them :D

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Neutral Newbie

I guess the issue is the Money given to scapegoat.

If no money records, then it may be like WW outcome.

 

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1st Gear (edited)

if they wans to fault you, they have millions of ways and reasons. If they wans to acquit you, they need no reasons.

Edited by Tom_kkh

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If my boss asked me to settle the fines, shouldn't it be understood as asked to pay the fine? Why did the driver go and find scapegoats?

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Turbocharged

Why the recent famous doctor who asked someone to take the rap was not jailed then ?

timeline issue.

 

famous doctor convicted crime before the rule change.

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Turbocharged

If my boss asked me to settle the fines, shouldn't it be understood as asked to pay the fine? Why did the driver go and find scapegoats?

 

because to those in triad, "settle" means very differently.... luckily the boss didn't mentioned any name.... it could become murder case... [:p]

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the ah seah and his 2 abangs are even more ELITE than the doctor leh.

strange that doctor was not jailed.

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Moderator

like that also can?

 

Jail term cut for businessman who found scapegoats for parking offences

Published on Jul 19, 2013

By Ian Poh

 

A businessman, who was convicted of instigating his driver to get two scapegoats for illegal parking offences committed by his friends, had his jail term reduced from six weeks to one on Friday.

 

Seah Hock Thiam had appealed against his sentence and conviction handed down last November. The 46-year-old is president of Esun International, which deals with the trading of scrap metal. His lawyer, Senior Counsel Davinder Singh, had argued in May that a fine would have been a sufficient punishment.

 

He was convicted last year on two charges of abetting his driver, Mr Mohamad Azmi Abdul Wahab, 40, to find two people to take the blame for traffic offences committed by Mr John Ho Ah Huat and Mr Ong Pang Aik. The two 54-year-old men had parked their cars illegally along Simon Road on Aug 12, 2009.

 

After both men received summonses from the Traffic Police asking for the drivers' particulars, Mr Ong faxed over the documents to Seah, who handed them to his driver to settle. Seah paid both scapegoats about $300 each, a sum that included the $120 fine.

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3rd Gear

1. are they parking offences?

2. was the original counsel also davinder?

3. what about the original offenders, i.e. his friends? were they charged with the same crime? why not?

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Turbocharged

 

 

Seah paid both scapegoats about $300 each, a sum that included the $120 fine.

 

 

That means the big/risky favour only deserve about $180.00? market rate?

 

 

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