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A carefully-worded response:

 

https://www.defensenews.com/global/asia-pacific/2018/03/20/singapore-denies-acquisition-of-new-leopard-tank-variant/

 

MELBOURNE, Australia ― Singapore is denying it took delivery of Leopard 2A7 main battle tanks from Germany, contradicting a report by a Swedish nongovernmental organization.

 

A spokesperson from Singapore’s Ministry of Defence told Defense News that “no other variants of the Leopard has been acquired” since the country ordered Leopard 2A4 tanks from Germany in 2006.

 

The spokesperson was responding to queries following the publication of the annual arms transfer database by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, which says Singapore received 12 Leopard 2A7 tanks from Germany between 2016 and 2017.

Two separate sources close to Singapore’s Leopard 2 program have also told Defense News they are unaware of Singapore adding the Leopard 2A7 into its inventory, with one citing the additional logistics burden of operating different subsystems on the Leopard 2A7 from its existing fleet of tanks.

 

Despite denying the acquisition of the Leopard 2A7, it does look like Singapore is ordering additional Leopard 2 tanks, with the German government’s annual military equipment export report stating that a further seven was delivered to Singapore in 2016. German government reports previously indicated that export licences for $402.6 million worth of “tanks, armoured bridgelayers, armoured engineering vehicles, trucks” and associated parts were granted to Singapore in 2014, although no specifics were mentioned.

 

 

Singapore initially ordered a total of 96 Leopard 2 tanks drawn from surplus German stocks in 2004, with 66 put into service and the remaining 30 reportedly gazetted for spares.

Further orders have been made prior to the 2016 deliveries, with Germany declaring the export of 161 Leopard 2 tanks to Singapore between 2007 and 2012 in its reports to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms database. Singapore declared the receipt of 156 Leopard 2A4s during the same period.

 

The German Army is in line for an upgrade of its tanks, based on the expectation that future conflicts will rely heavily on ground warfare with armored vehicles.

 

This would bring Singapore’s total to at least 163 tanks. The country also operates the Kodiak armored engineering vehicle, Buffel armored recovery vehicle and armored bridgelayers based on the Leopard 2 chassis.

 

The Leopard 2A4s are being progressively upgraded to the Leopard 2SG standard by ST Engineering in conjunction with Singapore’s Defence Science and Technology Agency. The upgrade program includes the addition of IBD Deisenroth Engineering armor kits; a new fire-control system and auxiliary power unit; a battlefield management system; and Elbit Systems’ Commander Open Architecture Panoramic Sight, which is manufactured under license in Singapore.

 

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A carefully-worded response:

 

https://www.defensenews.com/global/asia-pacific/2018/03/20/singapore-denies-acquisition-of-new-leopard-tank-variant/

 

 

MELBOURNE, Australia â Singapore is denying it took delivery of Leopard 2A7 main battle tanks from Germany, contradicting a report by a Swedish nongovernmental organization.

 

 

A spokesperson from Singaporeâs Ministry of Defence told Defense News that âno other variants of the Leopard has been acquiredâ since the country ordered Leopard 2A4 tanks from Germany in 2006.

 

 

The spokesperson was responding to queries following the publication of the annual arms transfer database by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, which says Singapore received 12 Leopard 2A7 tanks from Germany between 2016 and 2017.

 

Two separate sources close to Singaporeâs Leopard 2 program have also told Defense News they are unaware of Singapore adding the Leopard 2A7 into its inventory, with one citing the additional logistics burden of operating different subsystems on the Leopard 2A7 from its existing fleet of tanks.

 

 

Despite denying the acquisition of the Leopard 2A7, it does look like Singapore is ordering additional Leopard 2 tanks, with the German governmentâs annual military equipment export report stating that a further seven was delivered to Singapore in 2016. German government reports previously indicated that export licences for $402.6 million worth of âtanks, armoured bridgelayers, armoured engineering vehicles, trucksâ and associated parts were granted to Singapore in 2014, although no specifics were mentioned.

 

 

 

Singapore initially ordered a total of 96 Leopard 2 tanks drawn from surplus German stocks in 2004, with 66 put into service and the remaining 30 reportedly gazetted for spares.

 

Further orders have been made prior to the 2016 deliveries, with Germany declaring the export of 161 Leopard 2 tanks to Singapore between 2007 and 2012 in its reports to the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms database. Singapore declared the receipt of 156 Leopard 2A4s during the same period.

 

 

The German Army is in line for an upgrade of its tanks, based on the expectation that future conflicts will rely heavily on ground warfare with armored vehicles.

 

 

This would bring Singaporeâs total to at least 163 tanks. The country also operates the Kodiak armored engineering vehicle, Buffel armored recovery vehicle and armored bridgelayers based on the Leopard 2 chassis.

 

 

The Leopard 2A4s are being progressively upgraded to the Leopard 2SG standard by ST Engineering in conjunction with Singaporeâs Defence Science and Technology Agency. The upgrade program includes the addition of IBD Deisenroth Engineering armor kits; a new fire-control system and auxiliary power unit; a battlefield management system; and Elbit Systemsâ Commander Open Architecture Panoramic Sight, which is manufactured under license in Singapore.

This news is quote sometime ago. But I guess its probably inaccurate.

 

Pretty sure the units are still training in 2A4s

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https://www.cnn.com/politics/live-news/iran-us-tensions-latest-intl/index.html

 

Didn't realize that a Global Hawk cost so much more than a single F-35

 

Didn't realize that for that price tag it does not have any defensive fitments. It seemed that they forgot the lessons of Gary Power's U-2 downing incident and just felt it flew high enough to be immune. 

 

I am impressed that the Iranians didn't accidentally shoot down a passing jetliner like the Americans did. Or maybe its just pure dumb luck. 

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https://www.cnn.com/politics/live-news/iran-us-tensions-latest-intl/index.html

 

Didn't realize that a Global Hawk cost so much more than a single F-35

 

Didn't realize that for that price tag it does not have any defensive fitments. It seemed that they forgot the lessons of Gary Power's U-2 downing incident and just felt it flew high enough to be immune. 

 

I am impressed that the Iranians didn't accidentally shoot down a passing jetliner like the Americans did. Or maybe its just pure dumb luck. 

iran mention they willing to go to the UN to prove the drone enter their area.

US didnt respond to that, only insists that it did not.

 

and when US shoot down a civilan airliner and killing every 1 onboard.

i think they only pay about 200k per passanger.

 

non of the US officer was ever trial by any UN court any any court at all.

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https://www.cnn.com/politics/live-news/iran-us-tensions-latest-intl/index.html

 

Didn't realize that a Global Hawk cost so much more than a single F-35

 

Didn't realize that for that price tag it does not have any defensive fitments. It seemed that they forgot the lessons of Gary Power's U-2 downing incident and just felt it flew high enough to be immune.

 

I am impressed that the Iranians didn't accidentally shoot down a passing jetliner like the Americans did. Or maybe its just pure dumb luck.

To be fair, the global hawk may be a drone but it's a fairly huge one. In between the size of an F-5E and a F16. Looking at the shape I doubt maneuverability is its forte, let along out maneuvering a missile...

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To be fair, the global hawk may be a drone but it's a fairly huge one. In between the size of an F-5E and a F16. Looking at the shape I doubt maneuverability is its forte, let along out maneuvering a missile...

 

And that's kind of my point, the drone cost US$123 million and the F-35 $89 million. For a drone with no offensive or defensive capabilities to cost so much means there are heaps of extremely high-value technology on board - whereas the F-35 being a multi-role jet needs survivability, networking, stealth, offensive and defensive components.

 

Its singularity of purpose coupled with the high price tag is akin to leaving your diamond ring sitting on the front porch of your house, just within reach of random passersby swiping it as they walk past.

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Posted (edited)

 

 

u really need big tanks to make your army look differently [:)]

Edited by Beregond

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u really need big tanks to make your army look differently [:)]

 

we have a special guest in this year NDP. Need to show him so that he won't do funny thing to us

 

the organiser better ensure all systems go. If not, a medical doctor by training may say Singapore asset also sama sama [laugh]

 

In case of breakdown, which hard to say, they also must demonstrate speedy recovery

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u really need big tanks to make your army look differently [:)]

 

Actually, you need a column of big tanks to send a message. One or a handful isn't enough to deter as they can't be everywhere at the same time. 

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Posted (edited)

Maciam Guards unit, no?

They are Singapore only full regular Battalion so their training is more on the ball.

 

They cross trained guards and armored ops. Supposed to be our rapid deployment force.

 

Also CST trained by commandos..

 

Also any new hardware and gears they get to play first...

Edited by Pocus
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They are Singapore only full regular Battalion so their training is more on the ball.

 

They cross trained guards and armored ops. Supposed to be our rapid deployment force.

 

Also CST trained by commandos..

 

Also any new hardware and gears they get to play first...

IIRC, ADT was formed after our participation in Timor Leste. SAF did not have an entire unit deployable for combat operations into Timor. For Timor, a battalion (?) sized unit was hastily formed using mostly regulars all the way down to rifleman. Then, all infantry, guards and even commandos units were a mix of regulars and NSFs or NSmen. While it is technically possible to deploy, it would be a PR disaster if the casualty count stacks up. It was then SAF realized that we need an organic combat unit.
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IIRC, ADT was formed after our participation in Timor Leste. SAF did not have an entire unit deployable for combat operations into Timor. For Timor, a battalion (?) sized unit was hastily formed using mostly regulars all the way down to rifleman. Then, all infantry, guards and even commandos units were a mix of regulars and NSFs or NSmen. While it is technically possible to deploy, it would be a PR disaster if the casualty count stacks up. It was then SAF realized that we need an organic combat unit.

So this ADT unit is to ensure the $170 water tap at polis HQ has water when turned...?

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Sounds like the equivalent of a Marine Expeditionary Unit:

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Marine expeditionary units (MEU, pronounced "MEE-yoo") are the smallest air-ground task forces (MAGTF) in the United States Fleet Marine Force.[1] Each MEU is an expeditionary quick reaction force, deployed and ready for immediate response to any crisis, whether it be natural disaster or combat missions.[2] Marine amphibious unit (MAU) was the name used until the late 1980s.
 
An MEU is normally composed of: a reinforced USMC infantry battalion (designated as a Battalion Landing Team) as the ground combat element, a composite medium tiltrotor squadron forming the aviation combat element, a combat logistics battalion providing the logistics combat element, and a company-size command element serving as the MEU headquarters group. Troop strength is about 2,200 members and usually commanded by a colonel, and is deployed from amphibious assault ships. Currently, an MEU embarks men and equipment onto the amphibious warfare ships of an expeditionary strike group (ESG) which also includes escort warships and submarines to protect them from air, surface, and submarine threats. For further protection and strong air support, an ESG is often deployed along with one or more carrier strike groups.

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So this ADT unit is to ensure the $170 water tap at polis HQ has water when turned...?

 

It's for rapid deployment within singapore or overseas (in case of humanitarian disaster needing some security or boots on the ground to do some distributing).

 

Say for example, there's a security threat within singapore (maybe terror incident) requiring SAF response beyond normal police, then ADF will be first responders.

Even the corporal is regular lol.

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So this ADT unit is to ensure the $170 water tap at polis HQ has water when turned...?

 

It's for rapid deployment within singapore or overseas (in case of humanitarian disaster needing some security or boots on the ground to do some distributing).

 

Say for example, there's a security threat within singapore (maybe terror incident) requiring SAF response beyond normal police, then ADF will be first responders.

Even the corporal is regular lol.

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Sounds like the equivalent of a Marine Expeditionary Unit:

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Marine expeditionary units (MEU, pronounced "MEE-yoo") are the smallest air-ground task forces (MAGTF) in the United States Fleet Marine Force.[1] Each MEU is an expeditionary quick reaction force, deployed and ready for immediate response to any crisis, whether it be natural disaster or combat missions.[2] Marine amphibious unit (MAU) was the name used until the late 1980s.

 

An MEU is normally composed of: a reinforced USMC infantry battalion (designated as a Battalion Landing Team) as the ground combat element, a composite medium tiltrotor squadron forming the aviation combat element, a combat logistics battalion providing the logistics combat element, and a company-size command element serving as the MEU headquarters group. Troop strength is about 2,200 members and usually commanded by a colonel, and is deployed from amphibious assault ships. Currently, an MEU embarks men and equipment onto the amphibious warfare ships of an expeditionary strike group (ESG) which also includes escort warships and submarines to protect them from air, surface, and submarine threats. For further protection and strong air support, an ESG is often deployed along with one or more carrier strike groups.

Not exactly. Both are labelled as quick reaction force, there is where all the similarities end.

 

The MEU is able to spearhead, land and fight alone as part of Uncle tom’s power projection in hostile environment.

 

ADF is keyed more towards being part of a bigger operation such as UN peace keeping ops. They allow SAF to deploy an active combat unit on the ground instead of a more reserved security/ support that we had been doing prior.

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