Jump to content

Coaxial or Component for Rear speakers


Recommended Posts

Hi Experts this may have crop up many time but i need some advice here.

 

My current setup is a semi-passive 3 way speaker for the front and coaxial for the rear back speakers. I have an amplifier driving all of them togther with an 8 channel processor. Was wondering if upgrading the back speakers to component would have a significant difference to the surround sound, According to articles on the web it mentioned that you should not use component for the back as it may affect the sound stage and imagining of the sound as the back speakers are more like a filler or support for the front speakers. However i believe it is under the assumption that there is no dsp. Having a dsp should be able to solve that issue?

 

Your thoughts guys, component or to stay as coaxial.

Please healthy discussion please, I believe we are here to learn and share knowledge. Cheers

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

waste money

 

the car environment is never an audiophile ideal room or even close to it

 

if you have a reasonable set, just how much more money you need to pump in to get marginal improvements

 

if I were you seriously listening to music, I would invest in a home audiophile where you spend more time on than in your car.

  • Praise 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Experts this may have crop up many time but i need some advice here.

 

My current setup is a semi-passive 3 way speaker for the front and coaxial for the rear back speakers. I have an amplifier driving all of them togther with an 8 channel processor. Was wondering if upgrading the back speakers to component would have a significant difference to the surround sound, According to articles on the web it mentioned that you should not use component for the back as it may affect the sound stage and imagining of the sound as the back speakers are more like a filler or support for the front speakers. However i believe it is under the assumption that there is no dsp. Having a dsp should be able to solve that issue?

 

Your thoughts guys, component or to stay as coaxial.

Please healthy discussion please, I believe we are here to learn and share knowledge. Cheers

Hi there,

 

if you have a full DSP setup, i would just leave the rear fill empty.

 

But if you absolutely need rear fill ( kid, movies etc).

 

pros and cons:

 

Component speakers : more expensive, harder to install ( have to find location for tweeter).

If you want to control the rear fill further , more channels needed from the DSP etc. 

 

Coaxial: Cheaper, cheaper to install.

 

If you are after better sound ( ie concerned about the sound stage), ditch the rear fill :)

 

If die die need rear fill, go with coaxial :)

 

Cheers!

 

  • Praise 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

 

if you have a full DSP setup, i would just leave the rear fill empty.

 

But if you absolutely need rear fill ( kid, movies etc).

 

pros and cons:

 

Component speakers : more expensive, harder to install ( have to find location for tweeter).

If you want to control the rear fill further , more channels needed from the DSP etc. 

 

Coaxial: Cheaper, cheaper to install.

 

If you are after better sound ( ie concerned about the sound stage), ditch the rear fill :)

 

If die die need rear fill, go with coaxial :)

 

Cheers!

 

 

Hi thanks for the sound advice very well analysed, that seems to be the consensus. But recently been seeing quite a number people install component at the back too, installation is indeed an issue need to find the correct mounting location which may means need pods. My current backfill is already coaxial on dsp so the component can just replaced it if needed. But I guess if really go down the road the tuner have to really good.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Experts this may have crop up many time but i need some advice here.

 

My current setup is a semi-passive 3 way speaker for the front and coaxial for the rear back speakers. I have an amplifier driving all of them togther with an 8 channel processor. Was wondering if upgrading the back speakers to component would have a significant difference to the surround sound, According to articles on the web it mentioned that you should not use component for the back as it may affect the sound stage and imagining of the sound as the back speakers are more like a filler or support for the front speakers. However i believe it is under the assumption that there is no dsp. Having a dsp should be able to solve that issue?

 

Your thoughts guys, component or to stay as coaxial.

Please healthy discussion please, I believe we are here to learn and share knowledge. Cheers

 

 

I am a home audiophile and good ICE for cars is just as important, though I am not an expert on ICE. Mine is a co-axial for the rear back speakers. To me no need spend money so much for the rear speakers. Usually, lovely music played comes from the front and it sounds so much better. Spend more on front speakers, good amp and add-on a subwoofer. It brings your music to another level and I enjoy my drive so much. If no ICE it is so boring. I like my music warm, smooth and with a heavy bass.

  • Praise 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Components and Coaxial speakers essentially do the same thing; They take a full range audio source and reproduce portions of the band using separate drivers. Coaxial just bundles those drivers into a single speaker unit.

Other than that, the big differences between a coaxial speaker and a component speakers are:

A (better) crossover.

Larger, higher quality tweeter.

Separate components so you can position woofers/tweeters for better sound imagining.

Less mechanical interference between drivers

Amps are not required for either type of speaker, but what is required for component speakers is a place to mount the tweeter. If your car doesn't have a factory mounting point--such as the upper door, sail panel, a pillar, or dash--you'll have to make your own. And that can be a significant chunk of work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...