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Log off, get a life and stop responding to work emails

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after 6pm, says Amazon's India chief.

 

Personally, I try not to work after office hours unless it's absolutely necessary. That's why bosses are important. I know of some managers who ask their subordinates to do PowerPoint slides for them even during CNY Day 2. Such bosses don't understand work is never ending. It's hard to strike a balance, but we must try.

 

**********

 

https://www.todayonline.com/world/log-get-life-and-stop-responding-work-emails-or-calls-after-6pm-amazons-india-chief-tells

 

BANGALORE — The head of Amazon.com’s India business has a radical idea for his troops: Log off, get a life.

 

In an memo to his team this month, Mr Amit Agarwal counselled colleagues to stop responding to emails or work calls between 6 pm and 8 am in the interest of “work-life harmony".

 

He also talked about the importance of work discipline and how to draw the line.

 

The leaked note has broken through the sleep-deprived haze in the technology hub of Bangalore to set off heated discussions on social networks and WhatsApp chat groups.

 

Mr Agarwal is a senior vice president at the Seattle-based retail behemoth, which has a reputation of fostering a cutthroat work culture and driving employees to burnout.

 

Many in India wondered if this represented a softer turn for the company.

 

Mr Agarwal has previously served as an executive assistant to Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos, who is often painted as a demanding boss. An Amazon representative in India declined to comment on the email.

 

India, with its more than 1.3 billion people, has become a fierce battleground for Amazon.com, and the company has committed some US$5.5 billion to building up its network there.

 

Recently Amazon lost out to Walmart in a bid to buy Flipkart Online Services, India’s leading e-commerce operator.

 

While the demands of technology on workers has become a topic of debate around the world, work-life balance is severely off kilter in Bangalore, India’s third-largest city, where a significant portion of the one million workers employed in the outsourcing business cater to global customers and often work late into the night.

 

It’s even more lopsided in the up-and-coming startup industry, where late-night meetings and weekend calls are the norm.

 

Psychologists, sleep laboratories and fertility clinics have raised concerns about the mental and physical toll wrought by the frenetic work schedule.

 

Insomnia, depression and suicidal tendencies are rampant symptoms, said Dr S Kalyanasundaram, a well-known psychiatrist who sees many technology workers in his thriving south Bangalore practice.

 

“These days I see many 25- and 28-year-olds suffering heart attacks, something I haven’t seen in my four decades in this field,” he said.

 

The doctor said all of his Saturday appointments are reserved for tech workers and often booked months in advance.

 

“For many, there’s only one life and that’s the work life,” Dr Kalyanasundaram said. “It’s a disaster; it’s a ticking time bomb waiting to explode.”

 

In startups from Bangalore to Delhi, founders and top executives lead the gruelling pace by example.

 

Mr Ritesh Agarwal, the founder of the travel unicorn OYO Rooms and unrelated to the Amazon executive, said he gets minimal sleep during the work week. To catch up, he goes to sleep early on Saturday night and wakes up at midday on Sunday.

 

In Bangalore, Mr Byju Raveendran, founder and chief executive officer of the education tech startup BYJU’s said he and his teammates leave recreation to late night hours, sometimes starting football games at midnight and ending as late at 2 am.

 

Businesses from food delivery startups to late-night sports arenas cater to the insomniac workers.

 

Mr Dilip Vamanan, founder of an e-commerce data analytics startup called SellerApp, that helps merchants sell on Amazon, said he clocks 14 hours a day in the office.

 

After that, he takes calls and responds to emails at home. His colleagues complain of back aches, insomnia and stress.

 

Amazon’s Mr Agarwal, may have an inspired idea, but it may be harder to implement than it would seem.

 

“Indian startups have a lot to prove,” said Mr Vamanan. “They are nowhere near a scale where founders can step back and turn on the auto mode.”

 

BLOOMBERG

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after 6pm, says Amazon's India chief.

 

Personally, I try not to work after office hours unless it's absolutely necessary. That's why bosses are important. I know of some managers who ask their subordinates to do PowerPoint slides for them even during CNY Day 2. Such bosses don't understand work is never ending. It's hard to strike a balance, but we must try.

 

**********

 

https://www.todayonline.com/world/log-get-life-and-stop-responding-work-emails-or-calls-after-6pm-amazons-india-chief-tells

 

BANGALORE â The head of Amazon.comâs India business has a radical idea for his troops: Log off, get a life.

 

In an memo to his team this month, Mr Amit Agarwal counselled colleagues to stop responding to emails or work calls between 6 pm and 8 am in the interest of âwork-life harmony".

 

He also talked about the importance of work discipline and how to draw the line.

 

The leaked note has broken through the sleep-deprived haze in the technology hub of Bangalore to set off heated discussions on social networks and WhatsApp chat groups.

 

Mr Agarwal is a senior vice president at the Seattle-based retail behemoth, which has a reputation of fostering a cutthroat work culture and driving employees to burnout.

 

Many in India wondered if this represented a softer turn for the company.

 

Mr Agarwal has previously served as an executive assistant to Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos, who is often painted as a demanding boss. An Amazon representative in India declined to comment on the email.

 

India, with its more than 1.3 billion people, has become a fierce battleground for Amazon.com, and the company has committed some US$5.5 billion to building up its network there.

 

Recently Amazon lost out to Walmart in a bid to buy Flipkart Online Services, Indiaâs leading e-commerce operator.

 

While the demands of technology on workers has become a topic of debate around the world, work-life balance is severely off kilter in Bangalore, Indiaâs third-largest city, where a significant portion of the one million workers employed in the outsourcing business cater to global customers and often work late into the night.

 

Itâs even more lopsided in the up-and-coming startup industry, where late-night meetings and weekend calls are the norm.

 

Psychologists, sleep laboratories and fertility clinics have raised concerns about the mental and physical toll wrought by the frenetic work schedule.

 

Insomnia, depression and suicidal tendencies are rampant symptoms, said Dr S Kalyanasundaram, a well-known psychiatrist who sees many technology workers in his thriving south Bangalore practice.

 

âThese days I see many 25- and 28-year-olds suffering heart attacks, something I havenât seen in my four decades in this field,â he said.

 

The doctor said all of his Saturday appointments are reserved for tech workers and often booked months in advance.

 

âFor many, thereâs only one life and thatâs the work life,â Dr Kalyanasundaram said. âItâs a disaster; itâs a ticking time bomb waiting to explode.â

 

In startups from Bangalore to Delhi, founders and top executives lead the gruelling pace by example.

 

Mr Ritesh Agarwal, the founder of the travel unicorn OYO Rooms and unrelated to the Amazon executive, said he gets minimal sleep during the work week. To catch up, he goes to sleep early on Saturday night and wakes up at midday on Sunday.

 

In Bangalore, Mr Byju Raveendran, founder and chief executive officer of the education tech startup BYJUâs said he and his teammates leave recreation to late night hours, sometimes starting football games at midnight and ending as late at 2 am.

 

Businesses from food delivery startups to late-night sports arenas cater to the insomniac workers.

 

Mr Dilip Vamanan, founder of an e-commerce data analytics startup called SellerApp, that helps merchants sell on Amazon, said he clocks 14 hours a day in the office.

 

After that, he takes calls and responds to emails at home. His colleagues complain of back aches, insomnia and stress.

 

Amazonâs Mr Agarwal, may have an inspired idea, but it may be harder to implement than it would seem.

 

âIndian startups have a lot to prove,â said Mr Vamanan. âThey are nowhere near a scale where founders can step back and turn on the auto mode.â

 

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Personally I am OK with responding after work. Due to nature of my work, my boss is flexible so I try to be flexible, within limits. Of cos we don't calculate to exact minutes spent but just roughly can liao.

 

Of cos, talking about peacetime la. If not peacetime I think that is civil emergency, outlier situation liao.

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Easier said than done.

 

With the world being connected so closely with technology these days, the line between day and night at work is almost blurred out. Of course, depending on your role and responsibilities, some sure can but many are unable to.

 

With time zone differences, trying to hold a meeting regularly among continents is already a challenge. I sometimes wake up at 3am to a push mail on my phone and ended up replying to it.

 

The only way to log off after 6 pm is totally off the phone and stay away from the computer, but then how to post on FB, IG and mcf. [laugh][laugh][laugh]

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frankly, it is already bad answering calls or watsapp or sms after work hours. instead of this, company just need to be better organised. 

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Practical

 

each country's economy - who exactly is the backbone - SMEs and NOT MNC at large

 

for MNC they have the scale and lose abit here or abit there, it is like donation which will help further their business

 

but for SMEs, it is a dog eat dog world out there, you already fighting to have an edge over the neighbor company, you do anything to have an edge or survive

 

 

this work life balance, largely depends on our government, just how aggressive they really mean what they say

talk no use for MNC or SMEs

 

eg Germany most non essential shops and business don't operate after a certain time in the evening, it is law

 

 

 

 

 

after 6pm, says Amazon's India chief.

Personally, I try not to work after office hours unless it's absolutely necessary. That's why bosses are important. I know of some managers who ask their subordinates to do PowerPoint slides for them even during CNY Day 2. Such bosses don't understand work is never ending. It's hard to strike a balance, but we must try.

**********

https://www.todayonline.com/world/log-get-life-and-stop-responding-work-emails-or-calls-after-6pm-amazons-india-chief-tells

BANGALORE — The head of Amazon.com’s India business has a radical idea for his troops: Log off, get a life.

In an memo to his team this month, Mr Amit Agarwal counselled colleagues to stop responding to emails or work calls between 6 pm and 8 am in the interest of “work-life harmony".

He also talked about the importance of work discipline and how to draw the line.

The leaked note has broken through the sleep-deprived haze in the technology hub of Bangalore to set off heated discussions on social networks and WhatsApp chat groups.

Mr Agarwal is a senior vice president at the Seattle-based retail behemoth, which has a reputation of fostering a cutthroat work culture and driving employees to burnout.

Many in India wondered if this represented a softer turn for the company.

Mr Agarwal has previously served as an executive assistant to Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos, who is often painted as a demanding boss. An Amazon representative in India declined to comment on the email.

India, with its more than 1.3 billion people, has become a fierce battleground for Amazon.com, and the company has committed some US$5.5 billion to building up its network there.

Recently Amazon lost out to Walmart in a bid to buy Flipkart Online Services, India’s leading e-commerce operator.

While the demands of technology on workers has become a topic of debate around the world, work-life balance is severely off kilter in Bangalore, India’s third-largest city, where a significant portion of the one million workers employed in the outsourcing business cater to global customers and often work late into the night.

It’s even more lopsided in the up-and-coming startup industry, where late-night meetings and weekend calls are the norm.

Psychologists, sleep laboratories and fertility clinics have raised concerns about the mental and physical toll wrought by the frenetic work schedule.

Insomnia, depression and suicidal tendencies are rampant symptoms, said Dr S Kalyanasundaram, a well-known psychiatrist who sees many technology workers in his thriving south Bangalore practice.

“These days I see many 25- and 28-year-olds suffering heart attacks, something I haven’t seen in my four decades in this field,” he said.

The doctor said all of his Saturday appointments are reserved for tech workers and often booked months in advance.

“For many, there’s only one life and that’s the work life,” Dr Kalyanasundaram said. “It’s a disaster; it’s a ticking time bomb waiting to explode.”

In startups from Bangalore to Delhi, founders and top executives lead the gruelling pace by example.

Mr Ritesh Agarwal, the founder of the travel unicorn OYO Rooms and unrelated to the Amazon executive, said he gets minimal sleep during the work week. To catch up, he goes to sleep early on Saturday night and wakes up at midday on Sunday.

In Bangalore, Mr Byju Raveendran, founder and chief executive officer of the education tech startup BYJU’s said he and his teammates leave recreation to late night hours, sometimes starting football games at midnight and ending as late at 2 am.

Businesses from food delivery startups to late-night sports arenas cater to the insomniac workers.

Mr Dilip Vamanan, founder of an e-commerce data analytics startup called SellerApp, that helps merchants sell on Amazon, said he clocks 14 hours a day in the office.

After that, he takes calls and responds to emails at home. His colleagues complain of back aches, insomnia and stress.

Amazon’s Mr Agarwal, may have an inspired idea, but it may be harder to implement than it would seem.

“Indian startups have a lot to prove,” said Mr Vamanan. “They are nowhere near a scale where founders can step back and turn on the auto mode.”

BLOOMBERG

 

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Easier said than done.

 

With the world being connected so closely with technology these days, the line between day and night at work is almost blurred out. Of course, depending on your role and responsibilities, some sure can but many are unable to.

 

With time zone differences, trying to hold a meeting regularly among continents is already a challenge. I sometimes wake up at 3am to a push mail on my phone and ended up replying to it.

 

The only way to log off after 6 pm is totally off the phone and stay away from the computer, but then how to post on FB, IG and mcf. [laugh] [laugh] [laugh]

 

I sleep with my phone on airplane mode. 

 

Previously, i ignore all office emails and whatsapps after work.  I clocked out mostly after 8pm.

 

I used to have a part-time lawyer working for me.  On her off day, i keep on reminding her not to reply too quickly.

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work life balance is an individual thing, company or govt can't do much. It is the company culture and if it doesn't fit you, quit and look elsewhere, you can't ask the owner to change cos it is his company.

 

there are also people who dun want work life balance, they are so proud to hold 2-3 phones, talk about work and read and reply email while on holiday, make them look very important. Well if that suit them why blame the company?  company operates in their own way to survive, not to suit your lifestyle.

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work life balance is an individual thing, company or govt can't do much. It is the company culture and if it doesn't fit you, quit and look elsewhere, you can't ask the owner to change cos it is his company.

 

there are also people who dun want work life balance, they are so proud to hold 2-3 phones, talk about work and read and reply email while on holiday, make them look very important. Well if that suit them why blame the company?  company operates in their own way to survive, not to suit your lifestyle.

 

agreed. same when i chose not to specialise.

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I always logged off at 5.30pm sharp. No see my email till next working day morning. Dont care.

 

 

Last night, got a major incident, lives were at stake. I also bo hiew, this morning then read my email then know.

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I always logged off at 5.30pm sharp. No see my email till next working day morning. Dont care.

 

 

Last night, got a major incident, lives were at stake. I also bo hiew, this morning then read my email then know.

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if you have like 10 emails a day, and you dont manage ppl overseas or have your direct boss station overseas, of course you can do that.

 

Try logging off at 5.30pm if you have 200 emails a day. [laugh][laugh][laugh]

I manage 3 email addresses for a fleet of 80 vessels all over the world. I am administrator to two system for each vessel. The emails i received, can be overwhelming at times. But i simply switch off at 5.30pm sharp.

 

It is never-ending work. Just need to prioritise which is important and requires immediate attention.

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if you have like 10 emails a day, and you dont manage ppl overseas or have your direct boss station overseas, of course you can do that. 

 

Try logging off at 5.30pm if you have 200 emails a day.  [laugh]  [laugh]  [laugh]

 

I used to have that many emails a day.

 

In outlook, all emails which i am on cc, will be routed to a separate folder.

 

I read and reply main folder 1st.  If got time, i will look at that separate folder.

 

If ppl expect me to reply but put me on CC, orbi good lor.

 

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agreed. same when i chose not to specialise.

 

 

Doc to each his or her own

 

either choice are the same, that is, a higher calling, to serve your fellow human beings

 

 

i believe many who choose to be GP for the following reasons:

 

1. dont know what to specialise eg O&G, Pediatrics and etc, so some ended being GP, pathologist or even radiologist where they get to encounter all spectrum of disease and meet patients of all ages, unfortunately, today we do also see sub-specialisation in the mentioned discipline eg GP - some go into industrial, chronic illness and etc, and the same goes for pathologist and radiologist

 

2. being GP can be very rewarding because you get to follow your patient and their family; you become party of their family, even if you are in a group practice

 

3. personal reasons

 

 

but I also like to add that those who are in the para-medical line should really stop dispensing medical advice (not general well being advice and common conditions such as common cold) because it is dangerous. There must be a reason why doctors need to study for 5 years and 1 year internship and in some universities it is 6 years and 1 year internship. Dispensing inadequate or wrong medical advice can one day cause someone his or her life.

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wah all high flyers and big towkays

 

i peasant storeman get like 5 emails or less a day and knock off at 5 pm

 

waiting to be retrenched and drink north west wind soon

 

:mellow:  [knife]

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I manage 3 email addresses for a fleet of 80 vessels all over the world. I am administrator to two system for each vessel. The emails i received, can be overwhelming at times. But i simply switch off at 5.30pm sharp.

 

It is never-ending work. Just need to prioritise which is important and requires immediate attention.

 

 

ooorrrrhhh ship collision after 5.30pm now we know who to blame

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wah all high flyers and big towkays

 

i peasant storeman get like 5 emails or less a day and knock off at 5 pm

 

waiting to be retrenched and drink north west wind soon

 

:mellow:[knife]

I treat you cigar lah, dont worry

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Easier said than done.

 

With the world being connected so closely with technology these days, the line between day and night at work is almost blurred out. Of course, depending on your role and responsibilities, some sure can but many are unable to.

 

With time zone differences, trying to hold a meeting regularly among continents is already a challenge. I sometimes wake up at 3am to a push mail on my phone and ended up replying to it.

 

The only way to log off after 6 pm is totally off the phone and stay away from the computer, but then how to post on FB, IG and mcf. [laugh] [laugh] [laugh]

i remembered that i have a customer who said "i dun care abt time differences between US & Spore...tat is not my problem as long as response is given within 24hrs...."

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I treat you cigar lah, dont worry

 

T2

 

you very scary

 

give chicken wing but later take back whole chicken

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T2

 

you very scary

 

give chicken wing but later take back whole chicken

T2 is hsien loong?
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I treat you cigar lah, dont worry

 

true or not....don't be like that kusje buay steady one

 

:D

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true or not....don't be like that kusje buay steady one

 

:D

Huh. Who buay steady sifu?

 

Why me?

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work life balance is an individual thing, company or govt can't do much. It is the company culture and if it doesn't fit you, quit and look elsewhere, you can't ask the owner to change cos it is his company.

 

there are also people who dun want work life balance, they are so proud to hold 2-3 phones, talk about work and read and reply email while on holiday, make them look very important. Well if that suit them why blame the company? company operates in their own way to survive, not to suit your lifestyle.

Their work life balance is 90% work, 10% life

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work life balance is an individual thing, company or govt can't do much. It is the company culture and if it doesn't fit you, quit and look elsewhere, you can't ask the owner to change cos it is his company.

 

there are also people who dun want work life balance, they are so proud to hold 2-3 phones, talk about work and read and reply email while on holiday, make them look very important. Well if that suit them why blame the company?  company operates in their own way to survive, not to suit your lifestyle.

Quite true. You cannot say anything to people who treat their work like their life, as long as they are alive and awake, they think of work, checking email, off work late etc. If you happen to work in such company or under such bosses, and their style doesnt suit you or it is affecting you, no choice but to quit and move on with life.

 

I have seen such bosses before, who expect their subordinate to reply email during working hours within mins, regardless the email is important or not.  

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