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The first thought that flashed across my mind when I read the news: I am very thankful that Singapore have strict legislation to prevent the occurrence of such massive chemical incident. :confident:

 

 
pasir-gudang.jpg
 
JOHOR BAHRU: Malaysia’s education ministry on Wednesday (Mar 13) ordered all 111 schools in Pasir Gudang to shut after a suspected chemical leak there left hundreds of people ill with methane poisoning.
 
As of 8pm on Wednesday, more than 940 people have sought treatment for shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, said Johor Health, Environment and Agriculture Committee chairman Sahruddin Jamal.
 
Health Minister Dzulkefly Ahmad refuted a viral report that a student had died due to the chemical pollution in Pasir Gudang.
 
“I want to stress that the viral report about the death of a victim is not true. There is no death,” he told a press conference at the State Disaster Management Operation Centre on Wednesday.
 
Energy, Science, Technology, Environment and Climate Change Minister Yeo Bee Yin also said that one of suspects involved in the case is expected to be charged on Thursday.
 
In a statement on his official Facebook page, Education Minister Maszlee Malik said: “Unfortunately, I was told today that the situation is getting more critical.
 
"I've ordered for all schools within a three-kilometre radius to be shut immediately. Teachers also don't need to be on duty because the situation is still dangerous.”
 
Ms Yeo said that she has been in contact with the Attorney-General on the possibility of bringing multiple charges against the suspect, due to the serious nature of the offence and inadequacy of the penalty under the Environment Quality Act.
 
Upon conviction, a person can be sentenced to a maximum of five years jail and fined RM500,000 (US$122,000) under Section 34B of the Environmental Quality Act 1974.
 
“As the Department of Environment has completed the investigation, we will go ahead and prosecute but it is not limited to this (environmental) law. The person can be charged under the Penal Code and, possibly, other laws too," she said.
 
Two schools - Sekolah Kebangsaan Taman Pasir Putih and Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Pasir Putih - were first ordered to shut on Mar 7, after students and school employees breathed in methane fumes from chemicals that were illegally dumped in the nearby Sungai Kim Kim.
 
Over the weekend, at least 82 people were hospitalised or sought treatment. Three men were detained.
 
A second wave of methane poisoning hit just hours after the two schools re-opened on Monday.
 
By Tuesday evening, 13 schools in Pasir Gudang were ordered to close, as hundreds suffered methane poisoning.
 
Johor Fire and Rescue Department’s director-general Mohammad Hamdan Wahid said on Wednesday that the second wave of poisoning would not have taken place if the dumped chemicals were immediately removed.
 
He said the authorities did not dispose of the chemicals after concluding that they were no longer reactive, and believed it was due to the costs involved.
 
“This was not a good decision. By right, it should have been disposed earlier," the director-general was quoted as saying by Malay Mail.
 
“Due to the current hot weather, the chemical emitted hazardous fumes again, which then spread via (the) wind and made more people sick."
 
Mr Mohammad Hamdan said the school closures were necessary as the current hot weather could trigger further chemical reactions.
 

 

And that is the second occurrence. The 1st case was reported a week ago, on 7 March, with no further action taken. :pissed-off:

 

 
JOHOR BAHRU: Thirty-five people, mostly students, have been hospitalised after breathing in methane from chemical waste that had been illegally dumped into a river in Pasir Gudang.
 
Those who fell ill were students and canteen workers from two schools, which were ordered shut on Thursday (Mar 7) while investigations take place.
 
"Twenty-one people are warded at the Sultan Ismail Hospital here including three in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), five are being treated at the emergency unit of the hospital while the rest were given outpatient treatment and allowed to go home," said Johor Health, Environment and Agriculture Committee chairman Sahruddin Jamal.
 
"All of them, aged from seven to 40 years, are reported to be stable."
 
Dr Sahruddin had said earlier on Thursday that eight people were in critical condition. A student had fainted and five more started vomiting after breathing in methane on Thursday morning.
 
A tanker lorry is believed to have dumped chemical waste into the Kim Kim River in Johor on Wednesday morning. 
 
The Fire and Rescue Department has identified an area with a radius of about 500m which was polluted by the illegal dumping, and has installed oil booms to prevent the chemical from spreading.
 
While Dr Sahruddin said the situation is now under control, residents who show symptoms of gas poisoning, like nausea and throat irritation, have been advised to seek treatment. 
 
"The chemical is always moving in the water, so there is a possibility they are also exposed. If they experience symptoms like breathing difficulties, cough and red eyes, quickly go for treatment at the nearby clinics,” he said. 
 
Samples of the river pollution have been taken to be analysed. 
 
Those found guilty of illegally dumping waste can be jailed for up to five years and fined up to RM500,000 (US$122,000).
 
The incident has incurred the wrath of residents in Taman Pasir Putih, a town near the polluted site.
 
Several reported having headaches although their symptoms were not severe as the hospitalised victims.
 
Mohamad Hazrin Mohamad Razali, 39, said he was worried about his children because both of them have asthma.
 
Another resident, Asrul Abeli, 32, said the action was "thoughtless".
 
"What more it is near schools resulting in children becoming ill ... I hope an investigation can be conducted to catch the culprits,’’ said Asrul.

 

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  • Praise 1

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Heng I stopped running liao.

 

Seriously, abit concern for the resident of punggol and sengkang.

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Boleh garmen are busy thinking how to increase the water price from us. But forget to take a look at their own back yard water cleanliness.

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People responsible should be charge for murder.

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isn’t methane a gas at rtp?

 

how to dump into river and how will oil booms stop the spread?

 

 

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isnât methane a gas at rtp?

 

how to dump into river and how will oil booms stop the spread?

 

ð¬ð

Is it done chemical waste that react with water and change into gases stage.

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In recent years there would be occasional bad fumes in the air...not haze from Indonesia.

 

Recently there’s a report on three hot spot in Johore coupled with NE wind blowing the haze towards SK PG.

 

My FS book suggests I should move in NE direction for great fortune but that’d leave me only PG or Pulau Ubin. MLWML

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First post mentioned legislation. Legislation is there in Malaysia but it's the wild wild west there, anything goes, people will do anything but not get caught mentality. No law is going to help without education

 

The PH govt is busy fighting fire after fire, and until today ah jib case still stuck in the courts!

Edited by Sosaria

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I think the river is nearer to Pulau Ubin. Not Punggol.

Just googled map for the dumping gorund for SG kim kim. It much further inland than the industrial portion of Pasir Gudang. About 7km to Punggol Settlement.

 

My guess is this bridge location base on the report here,

 

 

 

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/johor-toxic-chemical-dumping-6-things-you-need-to-know

3. WHERE WAS THE WASTE DUMPED?

The toxic chemicals were dumped under a bridge connecting Taman Pasir Putih and Taman Kota Masai.

The location is just around half a kilometre from the schools where students were first affected: SK Taman Pasir Putih, and SMK Pasir Putih.

 

 

 

https://www.google.com.sg/maps/@1.4784076,103.9364382,21z

post-23584-0-24721300-1552591488.jpg

Edited by Ender

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Boleh garmen are busy thinking how to increase the water price from us. But forget to take a look at their own back yard water cleanliness.

Their backyard has too many other things to clean up other than water.

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Ownself small river cannot settle still want to kpkb other countrys' issues. f**k off madhatter, you are absolutely useless as a leader, only made your country worse and your legacy will never allow it to rise above its current standing. It's just too bad msians are too blinded to see that. Not that we are going to complain of course. The only thing madhatter is good at, is shouting about how certain folk deserve to get something for doing nothing.

 

x3

Edited by Mockngbrd

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Boleh garmen are busy thinking how to increase the water price from us. But forget to take a look at their own back yard water cleanliness.

our water source is also there.

 

i cannot imagine if 1 day same thing happen to it

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our water source is also there.

 

i cannot imagine if 1 day same thing happen to it

At least we still have sai/pee pee water

Edited by Mockngbrd

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pulau-ubin-2---2368664.png
 
SINGAPORE: No anomalies have been detected in Singapore's air and water quality, the authorities said on Thursday (Mar 14) after illegal toxic waste dumping in Pasir Gudang, Johor left hundreds of people ill.
 
In a joint statement, the National Environment Agency (NEA), Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA), Singapore's water agency PUB and the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF) said that they are closely monitoring the situation in Pasir Gudang.
 
​​​​​​​"We understand that the clean-up operation by the Malaysian authorities is in progress. The affected area is outside of the Johor River catchment, and there is no impact on Singapore’s water supply," said the statement.
 
"SCDF, NEA and PUB have not detected any anomalies in our local air and water quality. The Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority has been working with our farmers to monitor the situation and no anomalies or fish mortality have been observed at our fish farms."
 
On Mar 7, a tanker from an illegal tyre recycling factory is said to have dumped chemical waste into Sungai Kim Kim. Water from Sungai Kim Kim flows into the Strait of Johor, near Singapore’s Pulau Ubin.
 
SCDF and NEA said on Thursday that they are in contact with their Malaysian counterparts to get updates on the situation.
 
Earlier in the day, NEA said in a Facebook post: “The ambient Volatile Organic Compounds levels along Singapore’s coast remain within safe levels". 
 
"The seawater quality within the vicinity of Pulau Ubin is also within normal levels,” it added.
 
According to NEA, the 24-hr PSI since Mar 6 has been in the good to low-moderate range, while the 1-hr PM2.5 readings remained in Band I (Normal). 
 
As of 8pm on Wednesday, more than 940 people in Pasir Gudang have sought treatment for shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, said Johor Health, Environment and Agriculture Committee chairman Sahruddin Jamal.
 
All 111 schools in Pasir Gudang were ordered shut by Malaysia’s education ministry.
 
The Sultan of Johor Ibrahim Iskandar has pledged RM1 million (US$244,700) to help aid efforts, and has ordered authorities to act against those responsible for dumping the toxic waste and asked for a thorough investigation.

 

 

 

Just googled map for the dumping gorund for SG kim kim. It much further inland than the industrial portion of Pasir Gudang. About 7km to Punggol Settlement.
 
My guess is this bridge location base on the report here,

 

 


 

https://www.google.com.sg/maps/@1.4784076,103.9364382,21z

post-23584-0-24721300-1552591488.jpg

 

Actually the more worrying thing is with the contaminated water flowing downstream of Sungei Kim Kim, which will eventually ended up at the open sea, directly facing Pulau Ubin.

 

Meaning to say if the contaminant was not removed effective in the next few days by the Malaysian authority, it might continue to generate Methane along it flow path and Ubin may be next.

 

JK8MWlT.png

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Hope they clear that river in Johore asap so that their “Kim Kim” water can flow directly into our bin, U in shape as water catchment then Singapore Huat Huat all the way.

 

Late LKY very into FS one you know?

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By the time the river flows into the sea adjoining Pulau Ubin, the toxic liquid will be diluted by the mass sea water. Thus the methane gas will be thinned out and not causing us harm!

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wonder where is that fake degree chief minister now? that cannot sit in proton one [laugh]

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From safety point of view, if one is not aware of the hazard and risk he/she is subjected to, how can he/she be protected from harm, or to get situation under control?? :pissed-off:
 
 

cleanup-of-sungai-kim-kim-river-in-pasir

 

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pasir-gudang-methane-mahathir-hospital-s

 

PASIR GUDANG, Johor: “First, the doctors said six hours of observation, then it became 24 hours and later 48 hours … After that, they allowed us to go home … I could see that they were not very sure of what they were treating,” said Ms E Sujatha.
 
Her 11-year old son, who fainted at SK Taman Pasir Putih on Mar 7, was one of the earliest victims of the toxic waste pollution in Pasir Gudang that has since affected more than 2,700 people.
 
In the hospital, the doctors were not aware of what chemicals had affected the patients. Instead, some patients were given antibiotics or anti-vomiting medication, she recounted when interviewed by Channel NewsAsia on Thursday (Mar 14).
 
“Right now, we don’t know who is to blame (for the chemical dumping) but we are determined to take legal action ... For the victims’ families, we would really like to go all out to sue them.”
 
Ms Sujatha is among residents in Pasir Gudang who say the situation could have been better handled by the Johor Disaster Management Committee, especially in the area of public communications.
 
Mr Izurin Muhammad Amin, another resident in the area added: “At the moment, residents are in a panic and no one (from the state government) is giving any accurate information”.
 
He said most residents are ready to be evacuated if ordered to do so.
 
Mr Muhammad Fauzi Rohani, the chairman of a residents body against environment pollution in Sungai Kim Kim said the authorities should provide more information to residents through a townhall session.
 
“Right now, children are still playing outdoors as no one has informed us on how dangerous the situation is,” he said.
 
“Once the culprit is proven guilty, we will prepare litigation,” he stated.
 
He said those who have been affected indirectly should also be compensated. Over the past week, residents had to put up with a lot of inconvenience, including endless ambulance sirens at night, he added.
 
When asked on Friday whether the local government could have done more in terms of public communications, State Health, Environment and Agriculture Committee chairman Sahruddin Jamal did not respond directly.
 
Dr Sahruddin said: “I hope all the state assemblymen and members of parliament will meet the people to explain and tell them what has been done so that the people will understand.”
 
Two schools - Sekolah Kebangsaan Taman Pasir Putih and Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Pasir Putih - were first ordered to shut on Mar 7, after students and school employees breathed in methane fumes from chemicals that were illegally dumped in the nearby Sungai Kim Kim.
 
Initial cleaning works on Mar 8 had inadvertently worsened the chemical reaction, as the contractor engaged was not experienced in dealing with chemical waste.
 
Over the weekend, at least 82 people were hospitalised or sought treatment. Three men were detained.
 
A second wave of methane poisoning hit just hours after the two schools re-opened on Monday.
 
On Wednesday, all 111 schools in Pasir Gudang were ordered shut by Malaysia’s education ministry.
 
Some residents have reportedly evacuated from the area.
 
Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad stressed on Thursday that there was no need to declare a state of emergency.
 
“No … it has not reached that stage (where an emergency has to be declared). There is no need for any evacuation, but we must be careful," Dr Mahathir said.
 
The clean-up is expected to be completed within a week.
 
Despite the assurances, some residents do not want to take the risk.
 
Mr Izurin said that he has moved his family out of Pasir Gudang.
 
For Ms Sujatha, she has sent her three children to Kluang, around 120 km away from the affected area. “Now we feel safer for our kids by sending them away but what happens to those who don’t have siblings or relative nearby?”she asked.
 
Meanwhile, the number of people affected continues to grow.
 
The Pasir Gudang Indoor Stadium has been converted into a temporary treatment area. On Thursday night, people continued trickling in to seek medical attention.
 
According to a man who declined to be identified, he brought his 11 year-old son to the treatment centre after he complained of dizziness.
 
“He started to vomit and I rushed him here to have a proper scanning by the medical team,” he said.

 

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Received this picture but don't know if its fake or not ..... :slow:

Wtf?!?!!?!!?!!??!!?!!?? [crazy]

Saw on TV there are bags of black gooey stuff dump into the river.

:grin:

post-25827-0-70852700-1552651842_thumb.jpeg

post-25827-0-62370400-1552651849_thumb.jpeg

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pasir-gudang-methane-poisoning-sungai-ki
 
pasir-gudang-methane-poisoning-kim-kim-r
 
JOHOR BAHRU: What started out as an isolated incident of illegally dumping chemicals into a Johor river has escalated into a wave of methane poisoning cases, with more than 2,700 people taken ill.
 
The Malaysian education ministry has closed all 111 schools in Pasir Gudang, while the federal parliament debated a motion on whether to declare a state of emergency, only to later decide against it.
 
Here’s what we know so far:
 
Mar 6: A tanker lorry believed to be from an illegal tyre recycling factory dumps 20 to 40 tonnes of chemical waste into Sungai Kim Kim.
 
“The oily substance is believed to be oil waste commonly used in marine engine compressors and is considered scheduled waste that needs to be disposed of properly under the law,” says Johor Department of Environment’s director Mohammad Ezzani Mat Salleh.
 
Mar 7:  Thirty-five people, mostly students, are hospitalised after breathing in methane.
 
Two schools - Sekolah Kebangsaan Taman Pasir Putih and Sekolah Menengah Kebangsaan Pasir Putih – situated around 0.5km from the dump site, are ordered shut.
 
Mar 8: Initial cleaning works inadvertently worsens the chemical reaction, as the contractor engaged was not experienced in dealing with chemical waste.
 
Authorities did not dispose of the chemicals in the river after concluding that they were no longer reactive. The decision was also taken due to the costs involved.
 
Twenty-one students remain hospitalised.
 
Mar 10: Three men are said to have been detained, including two factory owners and a worker who are all in their 50s.
 
Mar 11: The two affected schools reopen but a second wave of methane poisoning hits. More than 200 people are affected.
 
This is “unexpected and regrettable”, says Johor chief minister Osman Sapian.
 
Mar 12: The number of people seeking treatment rises to 260, as 13 schools are ordered shut.
 
The Sultan of Johor Ibrahim Iskandar orders the authorities to act against those responsible.
 
“As a result of the irresponsible act, hundreds of people, including students and pupils, had to be rushed to hospital … These are my people and I will not let this continue. I urge all government authorities to quickly arrest and penalise the offenders,” says the sultan.
 
Mar 13: The education ministry orders all 111 schools in Pasir Gudang to close, while the number of people affected crosses the 500 figure.
 
Health Minister Dzulkefly Ahmad refutes a viral report that a student has died. 
 
Mr Osman, the chief minister, says the situation is under control and there is no need to declare a state of emergency in the area. "I don't expect the situation to worsen. Our main concern now is to complete the cleaning works as quickly as possible."
 
Meanwhile, the federal government allocates RM6.4 million (US$1.56 million) to clean up a 1.5-km stretch of the river.
 
Mar 14: More than 2,700 people are affected by the incident.
 
The federal parliament approves a motion to debate whether a state of emergency should be declared. However, lawmakers decide against the move.
 
Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad says there is no need to declare a state of emergency, while reminding all quarters to exercise more caution.
 
“No … it has not reached that stage (where an emergency has to be declared). There is no need for any evacuation, but we must be careful," Dr Mahathir says, when asked if there is a need to declare an emergency for Pasir Gudang or evacuation of residents there.
 
“Those mobilised to contain the situation must also be prepared to handle the problem,” he tells reporters after visiting victims who have been admitted to the Sultan Ismail Hospital.
 
The situation has stabilised and cleaning works at the site are ongoing and should be completed within a week, the New Straits Times reported Mr Osman as saying.
 
The Johor Sultan pledges RM1 million (US$244,700) to help aid efforts.
 
The crown prince of Johor, Tunku Ismail Sultan Ibrahim, hits out at the authorities over their handling of the incident.
 
In a series of tweets, he says: “Since the first day (Mar 7), an emergency should have been declared and residents temporarily evacuated elsewhere, until it was guaranteed safe.” 
 
Mar 15: The police say no arrests have been made thus far, despite earlier reports that three men have been nabbed.
 
“We did not say it. There were other parties that mentioned that, but the police do not have any arrests,” says police chief Mohamad Fuzi Harun.

 

 

 
malaysian-football-chief-tunku-ismail-su
 
JOHOR BAHRU: The crown prince of Johor, Tunku Ismail Sultan Ibrahim, has hit out at the authorities over their handling of a toxic waste pollution incident that has so far left more than 2,700 people ill.
 
In a series of tweets late Thursday (March 14), the outspoken royal said: “Since the first day (Mar 7), an emergency should have been declared and residents temporarily evacuated elsewhere, until it was guaranteed safe.”
 
“Two thousand people affected and no need to declare an emergency. Wow. Amazing.”
 
“Never mind that there wasn't (an emergency) declaration. But at least evacuate the area until everything is stable and safe,” he added.
 
The Sultan of Johor Ibrahim Iskandar has pledged RM1 million (US$244,700) to help aid efforts. He has also ordered authorities to act against those responsible for dumping the toxic waste and asked for a thorough investigation.

 

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