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Motor vehicles travel too Fast on SG Roads

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Posted (edited)

there would be idiots making stupid suggestions from time to time, key is the leaders must not be foolish to listen and implement  such stupid suggestions blindly, which I trust they would certainly not.

 

Maybe one day another so call expert would say SGPrean are walking too slowly, they should run instead of walk to pace the traffic to stay  healthy, more  green and productive to the country.  [laugh]

Edited by Ct3833
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30-40 kmh inside housing estate is good. For the safety of children and other pedestrians. Too many speedy Gonzalez in carparks also. In fact, there's already a low speed limiy but few people follow and nobody enforce. Even escooter and bike also speeding so don't talk cock about safety for cyclists and PMD users.

 

But to say all of non-expressway is ridiculous. In UK I also encounter a lot of speeding although they have cameras everywhere.

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You are still ok. For cyclist and ppl walking to their destination they are exposed to the sun even longer.

They are slowly being barberqued. [laugh]

 

We'll I'm not the one complaining in the first place hahaha.

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We'll I'm not the one complaining in the first place hahaha.

Actualli hor...i'm curious how often biker (real one, not leotards) wash their helmet? So much sweat accumulated inside...

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siao char bor!!! talk is free.

not free hor. need to pay 'expert' for their expert opinions

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Actualli hor...i'm curious how often biker (real one, not leotards) wash their helmet? So much sweat accumulated inside...

Going by this expert's recommendation, every 30km travelled would be an ideal time to clean the helmet as less sweat if slower-paced. Helmets in wallets not recommended as it's one use only lol

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Those points that she suggested, will have other issues created.

 

Reduce number of cars will create:

 

1.  congestion on public transport

2.  more breakdown of our poor train system

 

public buses and taxi or PHV will have to increase to cope with the increase in passengers... (LPPL).. still have more buses and cars to replace car ownership..

 

30km/h -  this is the most stupid speed suggestion I ever heard of.  She probably doesn't even know how fast/slow is 30 km/h...

I can't imagine all the vehicles on the road travelling at 30 km/h.... must be a nice view from top of the building looking down... long snake

 

Walking or cycling -  wow...  All offices will probably need to invest in a bigger toilet with shower tap and changing room... oh.. not forgetting  dressing table and hair dryer for the ladies.

 

Lastly, do not compare Singapore and London.... we are different in term of culture, climate and geographical.

What works in London doesn't mean it work in Asia.  Why not try suggesting this to Indonesia (Jakarta) and see what happen....

 

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Actualli hor...i'm curious how often biker (real one, not leotards) wash their helmet? So much sweat accumulated inside...

 

I don't bike but I have a full face helmet for go-kart n track.

 

the foam inner liner can be removed and washed. Probably can buy new one from the manufacturer too. Change every year if used daily?

 

also, wearing a balaclava helps. I use a cheap cotton one. Not FIA approved lol

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Posted (edited)

why ya’ll question a brits sexpert

she meant PMD la

PMD in spore no 60kmph no talk by ah bengs ...

that’s very fast.

Edited by Wt_know

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This Lucy Saunders could be related to the British comedian, Jennifer Saunders.

Displaying typical staightlaced Brit humor perhaps, with idiotic comedic advice.

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Another AM like Nas daily, brought in to force feed the national agenda. F off! I fully support giving people more options to go from point A to point B, but don't touch a person's right to choose.

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pls bend down and let every MCFers rear end your 'bumper'.  Else, pls go back to where u cum from n STFU.

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And.. . . ... I am half expecting the same tweet from Lucy right after she landed at Changi Airport..   :D

 

 

post-24957-0-50709800-1555340738.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Motor vehicles travel too fast on the streets of Singapore, said a British expert as she called for speed limits on all non-expressways to be slowed to 30kmh.

 

A 10kmh reduction makes "the difference between life and death", public health specialist Lucy Saunders, 39, told The Straits Times.

 

Most speed limits here are capped at 50kmh, with those at elder-friendly Silver Zones and some school zones reduced to 40kmh.

 

The slower speed limit is part of Ms Saunders' mission to improve health by creating healthier streets.

 

"A street that works for people is a street that is good for health," she told ST last Monday.

 

This Healthy Streets approach has been adopted by her home capital, London, and she was in Singapore last week to share it with government officials and urban planners.

 

There are 10 indicators of a street that is appealing, inclusive and promotes better health.

 

It needs to have clean air, shade and shelter, places to stop and rest, and things to see and do. Pedestrians from all walks of life should find it accessible, easy to cross and not too noisy. They should also feel safe and relaxed while using the street.

 

A healthy street also needs to entice people to walk, cycle or use public transport instead of drive.

 

"Walking hasn't been given the status it deserves," said Ms Saunders, noting that four in 10 adults in Singapore are not getting the weekly minimum of 150 minutes' exercise.

 

"That can be fixed with two 10-minute walks a day," she added.

 

While Singapore has relatively low car ownership - there are more than 615,000 cars for a city of 5.6 million - many people still drive or take taxis for short journeys, when they could walk or cycle.

 

She disagrees that the heat in Singapore puts a damper on the desire to walk, saying the climate is a huge asset, given its relative certainty.

 

"I don't see strong winds that could blow you off a bike," she said, adding that South Korea's capital Seoul has a culture of people walking and cycling even during the hot summer.

 

So, how would she grade the streets of Singapore after her five-day visit here?

 

She gives them a B grade, adding jokingly: "The challenge is that everyone expects Singapore to get an A."

 

The city has many pluses, she said, including the availability of public toilets at MRT stations and an abundance of trees and plants to provide shade and visual interest.

 

Meanwhile, Singapore's national agencies have major plans in their drive to turn the island into a car-lite nation.

 

The goal of the latest Land Transport Master Plan is that by 2040, all journeys to the nearest town can be completed in less than 20 minutes, while nine in 10 peak-period trips are to take less than 45 minutes.

 

Another is to make the transport system here safer and more welcoming. Some of the planned projects to get Singapore there include an additional 100km of sheltered walkways.

 

Ms Saunders has more ideas on how to make the streets more people-focused, not car-centric. She suggested reducing the width of traffic lanes to no more than 3.2m. Some lanes here are 3.4m to 3.5m wide.

 

"The narrower the lanes are, the more drivers concentrate," she said, adding that the accident rate is likely to drop in turn.

 

Ms Saunders also recommended levelling the roads on which people walk, so their journeys are not interrupted by having to step up and down pavements whenever they cross a street. She added that more road humps can then be installed to slow cars down at junctions.

 

In London, "nobody drives, because there's not enough parking, it's too expensive and everyone's friends take public transport," she said. The sharp drop in car ownership and use was the result of a concerted effort over 20 years.

 

She is confident Singapore can get there too, as it provides dedicated public transport lanes on the roads and limits the number of parking spaces in specified areas.

 

As Ms Saunders puts it: "Cars are space-inefficient and driving is useless time. We should get to the point where we use vehicles for when we absolutely need to, like getting a piano from one end of Singapore to the other."

 

 

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After 4 pages / 68 posts, why no one mention abolishing ERP and COE? Like that can easily hit 30Km/h mark without the need to make our road narrower, reduce paring space, etc. etc.  [grin]  :D  :D

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Posted (edited)

Haiya.. PMD and

Edited by BenTong

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soon.. pedestrian can walk faster than cars on the road....  [laugh]

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