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Subaru EyeSight vs Honda Sensing
 
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You can’t buy an autonomous car yet, but automotive safety technologies like Subaru EyeSight and Honda Sensing foreshadow a future of self-driving cars. This article will compare Subaru EyeSight and Honda Sensing, two similar crash avoidance technologies that are revolutionizing automotive safety.
 
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Primary Features

Subaru Eyesight is in its second generation since it was first introduced at the 2012 New York Auto Show. All 2015 Subaru cars with EyeSight earned superior frontal crash test ratings by the IIHS. This driver assist technology is now optional in the following 2015 Subaru models: XV Crosstrek, Legacy, Forester, Impreza and Outback. Here is a look at the primary features Subaru EyeSight offers.

 

Adaptive Cruise Control

Of the features Subaru EyeSight uses, adaptive cruise control is the show stopper that reflects a future of self-driving cars. Other car makers have attempted this technology with minimal success, but Subaru nails it.

Do you hate constantly setting and resetting cruise control because of surrounding traffic? EyeSight is similar to conventional cruise control features, but it will automatically adjust the speed if you come behind a slower vehicle. If the slower vehicle leaves your lane, the car will return to its original speed.

Even in stop and go traffic, EyeSight will automatically follow a car in front of you at one of three distance settings. If the car in front of you stops, EyeSight will come to a smooth stop as well. Simply press a button when the car in front proceeds and the Subaru will return to the original cruise control speed when possible.

 

Blind Spot Detection

New to the second generation of Subaru EyeSight, blind spot detection senses cars coming into a vehicles blind spot. If a vehicle is in your blind spot and you engage your blinker, Subaru EyeSight will display a flashing light on a side view mirror until the car leaves the blind spot.

 

Pre-Collision Braking

It happens to even the best drivers. You’re calmly cruising in your car and before you know it you’re only a few feet from the vehicle ahead of you. Pre-collision braking will detect when you are getting too close to a vehicle. The car first produces an audible beeping, followed by automatic braking.

Imagine you’re driving toward a stopped vehicle that you are completely unaware of. Even if you have your foot on the gas the entire time, the car will automatically brake for you to either avoid or lessen the severity of the collision. If you are applying the brake too lightly, the system will apply stronger brake automatically to help you avoid the collision.

 

Pre-Collision Throttle Management

 

Suppose a driver in front of you at a stop sign begins to accelerate. You begin to accelerate in anticipation, but the lead car slams the brakes. The system will see the danger, provide an audible beeping and decrease the throttle to give the driver more time to react.

This is also beneficial in parked situations. Have you ever put the car in gear, cranked your head 180° to back up your car and been shocked when you slam the obstacle in front of your car? Pre-collision throttle management helps you avoid these costly mishaps.

 

Lane Departure and Sway Warning

We all do our best to avoid momentary distractions while driving, but even the attention of the best drivers will occasionally slip. EyeSight will use the lines of the road to detect your car’s position.

EyeSight will give you an audible warning if the car begins to drift into another lane without blinking. The alert will help the driver correct the car’s course quickly. If the vehicle drifts back and forth in the lane, EyeSight will trigger an audible lane sway warning to alert the distracted or drowsy driver. This warning does not steer the car, but will afford the driver extra time to avoid costly and dangerous accidents.

 

Lane Keep Assist

New in 2016, Subaru offers Lane Keep Assist, a system that will automatically steer and correct a vehicle drifting from its lane. This has the potential to dramatically reduce accidents caused by drowsiness or distractions. When your turn signal is activated, Lane Keep Assist will NOT correct the vehicle, allowing you to freely transition between lanes.

 

honda-sensing.jpg

 

Primary Features

The Honda Sensing is an avoidance safety technology that has only recently been introduced to U.S. automobiles. The umbrella term, Honda Sensing, covers a suite of six safety features to be included on select Honda vehicles like the 2015 CR-V Touring. The 2015 CR-V received a superior front crash prevention rating from the IIHS. Let’s take a look at some of what Honda Sensing brings to the table.

 

Collision Mitigation Braking System

Thanks to a small camera stored behind the front Honda logo, drivers with Honda Sensing in their vehicles will have braking assistance to avoid frontal crashes. Honda Sensing will detect objects in front of the vehicle and attempt to slow the vehicle and give the driver an audible and visual warning.

Unlike Subaru EyeSight, the Honda Sensing will not bring the vehicle to a complete stop. It is only designed to reduce impact or give the driver extra time to manually stop the vehicle.

 

Lane Keeping Assist System

 

Should the driver accidentally leave his or her lane, the Honda will not only give an audible and visual warning, it will assist steering and bring the vehicle back into the center of the lane. Although not recommended, with Lane Keeping Assist activated you could hypothetically let go of the steering wheel and stay on the road. (Insert Carrie Underwood joke)

 

Adaptive Cruise Control

Honda makes setting cruise control a little less annoying in traffic by automatically adjusting your vehicle’s speed based on the speed of traffic. Honda Sensing’s adaptive cruise control feature is unable to completely stop the vehicle, but it boasts four following distance settings, one more than the Subaru EyeSight.

 

Honda LaneWatch

Honda-Lanewatch-300x200.jpg

Image courtesy of ExtremeTech.com

 

Make confident and safe passenger-side lane changes with Honda LaneWatch. This feature is essentially an attractive, tech-savvy version of old blind spot mirrors. When the driver activates the right turn signal, a view of the passenger-side lane will appear on the display screen in the Honda.

This camera view displays nearly four times what you can see using the mirror alone. Although this tool is not intended to be a replacement for checking your blind spot, it is certainly comforting to clearly see the entire area your vehicle is about to fill.

 

Comparison

Subaru-Eyesight-vs-Honda-Sensing.png

Subaru EyeSight has been turning heads in the U.S. for much longer than the Honda Sensing. The ability of Subaru EyeSight cars to come to a complete stop with adaptive cruise control and to avoid a collision is incredibly impressive, setting Subaru above its competition. Despite this, Honda LaneWatch is a progressive, practical tool that EyeSight can’t compete with yet. We eagerly anticipate more ground-breaking safety advancements from both companies over the next decade.

Crash avoidance systems and other automotive safety technologies are preventing accidents, and ultimately saving lives. Subaru EyeSight is easy to find, as it’s optional in the 2015 XV Crosstrek, Legacy, Forester, Impreza and Outback. Honda Sensing isn’t as prevalent, but it’s popularity and availability are increasing in new Honda vehicles.

 
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My friend test drive the forester with eyesight.

 

Was told to test the eyesight fixture at random vehicles on the road.

 

Signed on the dotted lines when back at the showroom.

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Posted (edited)

I watched some aussie YouTube video testing different common brands suv hard braking, slalom and also forward collision braking.

Forester was the winner.

I've got lanewatch in my car. In some ways it's better than blind spot monitoring (usually just a indicator on the wing mirror) cos u can see further down behind your car especially on expressway. For example rapidly approaching jb bikes...

 

but I do find a normal wing mirror indicator to be more intuitive to use.

U need to really look at the screen and that takes your eyes off the road more than if u checking your wing mirror (peripheral vision still on the road in front of u)

Edited by Lala81
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I remember there was one advertisement by Subaru, " the one car safer than a Volvo, it stops in time!"..  [laugh]  [laugh]  [laugh]

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Question is, if budget is not a concern - is the capability of Sensing or Eyesight a dealbreaker that will decide which dotted line you sign?

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My experience with Subaru Eyesight was in mid-2018. Wanted to buy Levorg with Eyesight. This is likely the 2015 version software stated in the threadstarter's info.

 

Was told by the salesman then that testing in tropical rainstorm during expressway driving gave poor results. Raindrops in singapore very big. So the Pre-collision braking to stop, and the Adaptive cruise control features are rendered non-optimal performance.

 

The other condition is our tropical sunlight during sunset eg. along ECP heading towards city during evening. The direct glare affects the sensor.

 

To date I can only vouch for Volvo CitySafety auto braking to stop because I have owned Volvo before.

 

Maybe try to get Subaru saleman to allow demo during rain storm or read the fine print of when the software sensors cannot guarantee optimal operation. Maybe the latest version has overcome the issues stated above.

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Correct me if I'm wrong but most of the Contis have these features quite awhile back.

The Japs are only just playing catch up but as always, they are good at copying and more importantly; improving these safety features so we shall see if this is indeed true.

 

As for consumers, the old school thinking of "if you have more features, chances of breaking down is greater" mentality will mean some buyers will not welcome these features with open arms and maybe even shun them which is a pity as the technology is there to assist drivers and add greater safety. 

 

Local Honda agent only has Sensing in a few higher end models so I'm glad Subaru agent is taking the lead to introduce even for lower end models! 

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Correct me if I'm wrong but most of the Contis have these features quite awhile back.

The Japs are only just playing catch up but as always, they are good at copying and more importantly; improving these safety features so we shall see if this is indeed true.

...

 

Got to correct you. The Subaru Eyesight uses stereo cameras unlike Volvo which laser radar (but looks out only about 10m ahead of vehicle and at speeds below 30 km/h. Means Subaru shape recognition and movement/speed sensing is superior and revolutionary. Not copying and adapting.

 

The Subaru system is superior in Adaptive Cruise Control too. Can bring car to stop and move off again maintaining set distance from front car without need for driver to prod accelerator. Can auto steer, can stay in lane or driver can touch steering and steer without system switching off. So almost like robot autonomous driving and safety braking.

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I just remembered one more thing about the Subaru eyesight:

 

 

Not recommended to install solar film on front windscreen. Because using stereo cameras to look out, so image could be distorted.

 

And Subaru does not offer heat reflective glass on windscreen unlike some conti brands, I think. Driving in Singapore really need good solar rejection film on windscreen.

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Would've loved to get these features if the local Japanese AD's bring them in.

 

The CRV for example has it in overseas models, but KM (in all its brilliance) decided it won't have it. Only way to get it for the CRV is via PI. Probably all comes down to OMV and dealer margin that dissuades them from bringing the features in.

 

In any case I looked at the Forester when looking to purchase a crossover. It's all good and well that is has eyesight, but I was unimpressed with the rest of the car. In my eyes, the rest of the car (engine, styling) couldn't make it. The only other Japanese crossover with it was the new Rav4, and it lacks niceties like a LCD HU.

 

Maybe embarrassing to say, but I rate the basics like engine and creature comforts, over these safety features. But if given the option to get it (which isn't afforded based on the specs the AD brings in, I would've gotten it).

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Another thing to consider, Will insurance be cheaper if I buy a model with these advanced safety features?

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Another thing to consider, Will insurance be cheaper if I buy a model with these advanced safety features?

 

No cheaper. I bought Vezel with Honda sensing but insurance still around same.

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Another thing to consider, Will insurance be cheaper if I buy a model with these advanced safety features?

Apparently the car safety bodies like NCAP will no longer give the highest safety ratings if the car doesn't have these autonomous features.

 

So it should become pretty standard (assuming the AD's bring it)

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Posted (edited)

I just remembered one more thing about the Subaru eyesight:

 

 

Not recommended to install solar film on front windscreen. Because using stereo cameras to look out, so image could be distorted.

 

And Subaru does not offer heat reflective glass on windscreen unlike some conti brands, I think. Driving in Singapore really need good solar rejection film on windscreen.

 

From what I gather, Subaru EyeSight is into 3rd generation now.

 

I owned a 2019 Forester i-L (SK series) and as expected, Motor Image does not provide solar film for front windscreen, with all the "these-and-that" reasons. 

 

After making some enquires and study, I went ahead to install high spec. solar film for front windscreen.  The EyeSight works as expected - land departure warnings, adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking... no issue at all.  Of course, I have to bear the risks, which for me (as an engineer) is acceptable.  I have no regret with my decision to fit solar film to the front windscreen, but I guess it is personal choice for everyone.

Edited by JBboy
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Cant comment on Honda Sensing since nvr driven before.

 

But I am currently driving a XV ES. Generally ES works fine in our road conditions. There are times when ES is disable due to heavy downpour, but it is understandable. Other than that, nvr had a issue with ES till date.

It is always good to have an additional pair of safety eyes to help keeping a lookout. And it is also good that the car makers are moving towards increasing safety aspect althought each technologies may be different.

 

But hey, safety at the end of each day is what we drivers want for ourselves and family, isn't it.

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