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UK’s first 5G network taster goes live in six cities tomorro

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no Huawei, no problem ...

 

UK’s first 5G network taster goes live in six cities tomorrow

 

The UK’s first 5G consumer mobile network is launching tomorrow in six cities.
 
Mobile network operator EE will switch on the next-gen cellular connectivity in select locations in London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Belfast, Birmingham and Manchester — promising “increased speeds, reliability and connectivity”. Though of course consumers will also need to have a 5G handset and 5G price plan, as well as being in the right location, to see any of the touted benefits.
 
EE says it expects customers to experience an increase in speeds of around 100-150Mbps when using the 5G network — “even in the busiest areas” where network coverage extends.
 
“Some customers will break the one gigabit-per-second milestone on their 5G smartphones,” it adds.
 
Ten other UK cities are set to get a taste of EE’s 5G later by the end of this year, also in select, busier parts — namely Glasgow, Newcastle, Liverpool, Leeds, Hull, Sheffield, Nottingham, Leicester, Coventry and Bristol — with more cities planned to come on stream in 2020.
 
While rival mobile operator Vodafone has said it will began its own rollout of a 5G network in July.
 
Among the advantages for 5G that EE is pushing on its website to try to persuade users to upgrade are better connections in busy places (such as festivals or stadiums); faster download speeds to support movie downloads and higher quality video streaming; and a gamer-friendly lack of lag — which it bills as “almost instant Internet connection”.
 
Whether those additions will convince masses of mobile users to shell out for an EE 5G device plan — which start at £53 per month — remains to be seen.
 
Earlier this month the network operator, which is owned by BT, launched its first 5G Sim-only handset plans, and began ranging 5G handsets — from the likes of Samsung, LG, OnePlus and Oppo.
 
Though not from Huawei. Last week it told the BBC it would pause on offering any 5G smartphones made by Chinese device maker Huawei — saying it wanted to “make sure we can carry out the right level of testing and quality assurance” for its customers.
 
Huawei remains subject to a US executive order intended to dissuade US companies from doing business with it on national security grounds. And Google has been reported to have taken a decision to withdrawn some Android-related services from Huawei — raising question-marks about the future quality of its smartphones. (The Chinese company’s involvement in building out core UK 5G networks is also subject to restriction, with the government reportedly intending to impose limits.)
 
EE says the 5G network it’s launching tomorrow is an additional layer on top of its existing 4G network — dubbing it “phase 1”. So this switch on is really a toe in the water. Or, well, a marketing opportunity to claim a 5G first.
 
It describes it as a “non-standalone” deployment, saying it’s combining 4G and 5G to “give customers the fastest, most reliable mobile broadband experience they’ve ever had” — saying it’s planning to upgrade more than 100 cell sites to 5G per month, as it builds out 5G coverage.
 
It will also expand its 4G coverage into rural areas and add more capacity to 4G sites — as 4G will remain the fall-back option for years to come (if not indefinitely).
 
Phase 2 of EE’s 5G rollout, from 2022, will introduce the “full next generation 5G core network, enhanced device chipset capabilities, and increased availability of 5G-ready spectrum”.
 
“Higher bandwidth and lower latency, coupled with expansive and growing 5G coverage, will enable a more responsive network, enabling truly immersive mobile augmented reality, real-time health monitoring, and mobile cloud gaming,” EE adds.
 
A third phase of the 5G rollout, from 2023, is slated to bring Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communications, Network Slicing and multi-gigabit-per-second speeds.
 
“This phase of 5G will enable critical applications like real-time traffic management of fleets of autonomous vehicles, massive sensor networks with millions of devices measuring air quality across the entire country, and the ‘tactile internet’, where a sense of touch can be added to remote real-time interactions,” EE suggests.
 
As we’ve said before, there’s little call for consumers to rush to upgrade to a 5G handset, with network coverage the exception not the rule, even as building out the touted benefits of so-called ‘intelligent connectivity’ will be a work of years.
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Posted (edited)

The propanganda of being top in 5G ahead of the rest of the world is how seow. The first consumer deployment was Korea during winter olympics, now UK also deploy. None of it got to do with HW. Incrementally, issues discovered and learnt from deployment will be corrected. No deployment means it's just talk only, free one.

Edited by Roadrunner2029

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damn..on the eve of our big match?

 

hope it won't affect my streaming.

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I wish they can stop all the hype on 5G.

 

I think there will still be hardware limitations because of size.

 

Take wifi for instance if you compare the signal receiving strength of a mobile phone vs a laptop the laptop will have a stronger receiving signal just because it has a bigger size chip and a bigger battery to support and give a stronger receiving signal.

 

5G is is also dependant on fibre optics lines to transmit the large data. So if some goondu contractor  go cut the lines we will experience the same mass outtage we had experienced before. There goes your so called reliability or stability. All talk is based on ideal situations. It's as good as not saying it at all.

 

I dont think 5G is some dragon or phoenix wireless revolution. It's just a tweak to the current one. It doesnt deserve so much attention. It's more of marketing and competition for the service providers.

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I wish they can stop all the hype on 5G.

 

I think there will still be hardware limitations because of size.

 

Take wifi for instance if you compare the signal receiving strength of a mobile phone vs a laptop the laptop will have a stronger receiving signal just because it has a bigger size chip and a bigger battery to support and give a stronger receiving signal.

 

5G is is also dependant on fibre optics lines to transmit the large data. So if some goondu contractor  go cut the lines we will experience the same mass outtage we had experienced before. There goes your so called reliability or stability. All talk is based on ideal situations. It's as good as not saying it at all.

 

I dont think 5G is some dragon or phoenix wireless revolution. It's just a tweak to the current one. It doesnt deserve so much attention. It's more of marketing and competition for the service providers.

 

I agree that 5G ain't going to be a big deal for us consumers but not for the reasons you stated.

 

To me, 5G is about a speed increase. Right now, is anyone having problems with 4G speed? I can stream netflix, youtube content on my phone just fine right now with the current speeds - why do I need 5G?

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Posted (edited)

I agree that 5G ain't going to be a big deal for us consumers but not for the reasons you stated.

 

To me, 5G is about a speed increase. Right now, is anyone having problems with 4G speed? I can stream netflix, youtube content on my phone just fine right now with the current speeds - why do I need 5G?

not for speed I reckon. gear toward facilitating more other applications which required fastest and stable speed. our upcoming gps erp? defence? hahaha.

 

anyhow I see that nowaday more residential also encompass more and more appliances with required network access. Someone here just brought a goggle TV. can talk talk. hahaha

 

my boy K1 coming term the school will be implementing dojo academic curriculum in class. I was like what? new instant noodle? hahaha spoken to the school. It is an interactive program to allow parents live participation in class activity with their child. hmm we will be seeing more and more such Internet based activities in our society.

Edited by Kopites

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Forget 5G, China begins development of 6G

The world has barely started using 5G, the latest generation of wireless connectivity, but China is already looking ahead to 6G.

China’s science and technology ministry announced yesterday (Nov. 6) that it has formed two teams to oversee the research and study of 6G, marking the official start of a state-backed effort to accelerate the development of the technology, according to the notice (link in Chinese). One team consists of government departments who will be in charge of pushing through the execution of 6G technology, while the other consists of 37 experts from universities, science institutions and corporations, who will provide technical advice for the government’s major decisions on 6G.

5G and 6G refer to the fifth and sixth generation of mobile wireless networks. While 5G is known to have data transmission speeds at least 10 times greater than 4G, rolled out in 2009, it’s too early to say what 6G could be, or what sorts of technologies it would advance.

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