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Hong Kong protesters demonstrate against extradition bill

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Supersonic

Well, the last of NZ troops left Singapore only in the late 1980's. I personally knew a NZ serviceman who was based in SG, who later moved back to NZ got married and have kids there. He was entirely aware of the threats and why he was in SG.

 

Ah. But it was more politically expedient for KL to kick us out.

Lol PRC is like those hoarders, never want to let one item go  [laugh]

 

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5th Gear

The Hong Kong Bros and sisters are fighting for their future against mighty powers. Lets give them our blessings and support by posting at http://supportamovement.net/HongKongprotest . Who knows, one day we might need their support too. I signed.

i don't support rioter.

 

i support hkpf

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Hypersonic

Zheng is her maiden surname.

 

Lin is hubby surname.

 

It is widely used in HK & TW.

Is this only for women?
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Supersonic (edited)

https://china.hket.com/article/2417185/%E3%80%90%E4%B8%AD%E7%BE%8E%E8%B2%BF%E6%98%93%E6%88%B0%E3%80%91%E5%8C%97%E4%BA%AC%E5%AD%B8%E8%80%85%EF%BC%9A%E4%B8%AD%E7%BE%8E%E8%B2%BF%E6%88%B0%20%C2%A0%E4%B8%AD%E5%9C%8B%E5%9C%A8%E6%B3%95%E5%BE%8B%E4%B8%8A%E8%BC%B8%E7%B5%A6%E7%BE%8E%E5%9C%8B

 

This is another interesting article.

 

 

「批判美國的全球法律霸權很容易,但讓你建構起全球法律霸權試一試,就知道這個問題有多難。因此,我們對於美國建構的全球法律治理體系,不僅要持批判的立場,更要持虛心學習的立場,學習越認真,才越有資格批判。」

 

Edited by Davidtch

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Turbocharged

i don't support rioter.

 

i support hkpf

Any country or organisation supporting rioters show they are hypocrite. Would they wish or hope the same thing happen to them? 

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Twincharged (edited)

More distraction coming?

 

PS: I received these photos from several Whatapps group chat. Photos NOT taken by me or from other website.

實在太胸狠了!

 

Can easily injure all the Ah Sir if not careful.

Edited by Jellandross
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Supersonic

實å¨å¤ªè¸ç äºï¼

 

Can easily injure all the Ah Sir if not careful.

All the ah sir “stand” too long already
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Supercharged

 

This website looks like some taiwanese sponsored anti-china site....

 

can read to see what the anti-CCP propaganda is talking about, the other side of the fence

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Supersonic

Walt Disney pictures just contacted me, wanted to make a movie "Tianmo arrive naked", I still considering.  [:p]  [laugh]  [laugh]

 

There, add a word for you ...  :we-all-gonna-die: 

 

no worries, Walt Disney won't Jap AV will ....  [sly]

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Supersonic

im guessing he can kiss any govt promotion goodbye....

 

Google his credential.

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Supersonic

This website looks like some taiwanese sponsored anti-china site....

 

can read to see what the anti-CCP propaganda is talking about, the other side of the fence

 

I googled HKET.  It seems like it is a company listed on HKSE.

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Supercharged (edited)

An insightful piece by Nury Vittachi on HK. Nury is not known for his pro-China views but is honest enough as a pro-democracy journalist to point out what has gone wrong with the protest movement

 

A BIG FAT UNASKED QUESTION lies at the heart of Hong Kong freedom protests. And that question could be aimed squarely at this writer, who has consistently participated in protest rallies in this southern Chinese city for more than 30 years. 

.

You’re marching for lost freedoms—but what freedoms have you lost? 

.

It should be an easy question to answer. But it isn’t. 

.

“Er, freedom of the press?” I venture. 

.

But even as I say that, I know that's not true. Today, I frequently mock Chinese authorities in print and online without fear. When I used to do that during the British era, I was in constant trouble. 

.

“Freedom to protest?” 

.

We clearly haven’t lost that: thousands of us have attended licensed and unlicensed marches without being stopped by the authorities.

.

“Loss of the rule of law?” 

.

No. The World Bank’s rating system on the rule of law saw Hong Kong given 69.9 points out of 100 in 1996, the end of the British era. Two decades later, Hong Kong people had lifted it to 93.75. 

.

“Freedom of Information?” 

.

Not lost. We have greater access to data (and better privacy protection) than we had in the British era.

.

“Freedom of Belief?” 

.

Not lost. We welcome all major religions, including those banned in China.

.

“Freedom to choose our own leaders?” 

.

Not lost—because we never had it. But we were offered it in 2015 and turned it down. And closer inspection of THAT story leads us to uncovering the secret rule that explains what’s really happening in Hong Kong. 

.

To understand Hong Kong’s recent history, there are six dates/ incidents you need to know:

.

 

DATE #1) THE UNWRITTEN RULE

.

On December 26, 2013, a group of pro-democracy group trespassers got into the Hong Kong headquarters of the PLA carrying a British colonial flag. They were widely condemned as “gang du” – independence campaigners, or “separatists” to use the mainland term.

.

Shortly afterwards, an unwritten law emerged, miasma-like, from the regular closed-door meetings between Hong Kong’s rulers and their mainland Chinese overlords. 

.

This was it:

.

“Be free, but be family.” In plain English, it meant: “Hong Kong can have all the freedoms it wants, AS LONG AS NO ONE PROMOTES SEPARATISM.”

.

Denunciations of independence suddenly became a regular theme for Hong Kong’s then leader, a property developer named Leung Chun-ying.

.

.

A WELCOME DEAL

.

The new rule was a very big carrot (all the freedoms you want!) and a very small stick (except for one little one!). 

.

It was an excellent deal, since Hong Kong people did not want independence. 

.

Not one of our major political parties favored it: All assumed the continuation of the present successful relationship. 

.

.

WESTERN MEDIA’S ERROR

.

This is worth taking a moment to clarify: Foreign correspondents from the west nearly always arrive in this city with the assumption that Hong Kongers hate and fear our neighbors to the north.

.

This is not so. We have a love-hate relationship with China. We simultaneously hold “positive and negative emotive affiliation toward national identity” according to academic Chan Chi-kit.

.

We only seem to hate China. Hong Kongers’ favorite holiday destination is mainland China. When there are disputes over islands in the sea, Hong Kongers passionately support China’s claims, some of our citizens even sailing out there to wave the flag. 

.

In a thousand different business sectors across our city, Hong Kong people want more integration with mainland China, not less. 

.

Hong Kong pretends to be a global tourism hub, but the reality is that we know that four-fifths of the tourists on whom our economy depends are cousins from mainland China.

.

.

DATE #2) HITTING A WALL

.

In Hong Kong, our wide freedoms continued, but the second part of the unwritten rule eventually caused a stumble on 31 August 2014. The Hong Kong public was offered universal suffrage but with a vague and annoying proviso that the candidates would needed to be checked for suitability first. 

.

Outrageous! Media pundits (including the present writer) interpreted this as an unacceptable vetting procedure that would only allow pro-Beijing candidates to stand. I summarized the proposal “Choose Your Own Puppet”.

.

This reporter joined thousands in protesting against it as part of what became known as the “umbrella movement”.

.

.

A MISUNDERSTANDING?

 

But we got it wrong.  We now know that Hong Kong people were being offered full universal suffrage, one-man-one-vote, with the simple proviso that we could have anyone EXCEPT an independence activist, since China felt that would spoil the present positive relationship, and go against the spirit of the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution.

.

And while pro-establishment politicians were not separatists, NEITHER were any of the pro-democracy leaders, such as Anson Chan, Martin Lee, and Audrey Eu. 

.

Could one of them have been accepted as election candidates and won? We’ll never know—because the entire scheme was rejected by pro-democracy politicians, causing an unfortunate return to the universally disliked electoral college system known locally as “the small circle election”.

.

.

WE MESSED UP

.

Many people now feel that was a mistake, says Daniel Vukovich, an East Asian studies scholar in Hong Kong. What we were offered wasn’t pure Western democracy but was the closest thing possible in Chinese territory. 

.

This can be a touchy subject to discuss. Statistical evidence suggests that Asian “illiberal” democracy (Hong Kong, Singapore, China) can speedily rescue people from abject poverty and give them health and wealth in a single generation. 

.

Unfortunately, pure Western liberal democracy is the only societal management model acceptable to the Western media—yet can work extremely poorly in Asia (see India or the Philippines).

.

Vukovich warns against the “the arrogance or presumptuousness” of assuming the existence of “supposedly universal norms and political forms”.

.

.

DATE #3) ENTER MR ROGERS

.

On October 11, 2017, a British conservative politician named Benedict Rogers, a friend of the present writer, was denied entry into Hong Kong. Many in the media, this writer included, expressed dismay. 

.

But there was a story behind it. Before leaving the UK, Rogers had been warned by a contact at the Chinese embassy in London that he may be denied entry into Hong Kong.

.

He had regularly spoken and written about people wanting more freedom in China’s restive edges, and this had led to him being labeled as a separatist. 

.

.

DATE #4) PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE

.

On October 7 last year, a Financial Times editor, Victor Mallet, received a shorter-than-expected visa for his stay Hong Kong, a move seen as an expulsion. 

.

Many interpreted this as an attack on the freedom of the press. 

.

But the truth was that he’d never complained of the Hong Kong government censoring his work in any way. The trouble came purely from Mallet’s decision to host a high profile speech for a Hong Kong independence campaigner—and thus break the unwritten rule. 

.

Why take such a staggering risk? Before this event, Mallet had already decided to leave Hong Kong and had made arrangements to move to Paris. I know this is true, because he told me himself.

.

.

DATE #5) PUTTING FREEDOMS AT RISK

.

The present series of protests started on June 9, 2019. Naive foreign correspondents (and there are many) like to present it as a case of Teen Heroes Battle Evil Empire Over Lost Freedoms. 

.

But the truth is that we haven’t lost our freedoms. The “one country, two systems” scheme has been working extremely well, as Hong Kong barrister Simon Westbrook said in a BBC interview recently.

.

The irony of the situation is this: the messages we carry in our current protests mean that we soon might lose them. The demonstrations carry a strong underlying theme of separatism—and threaten the unwritten rule that preserves our freedoms.

.

.

DECOLONIZATION FROM CHINA

.

On June 26, protesters delivered a letter to the United States Consulate General in Hong Kong asking Donald Trump to “decolonize Hong Kong” from China. Protesters chanted “Hong Kong is not China” as they marched.

.

Later that day, someone arrived with a big batch of posters saying “Free Hong Kong: Democracy Now” in English, combining a subliminal message of independence with the magic word “democracy”, which guarantees sympathetic news coverage by Western media.

.

Protesters started defacing China and Hong Kong flags and symbols, and waving British and United States flags.

.

.

DATE #6) INDEPENDENT HONG KONG FLAG

.

On July 28, an “independent Hong Kong” flag was raised in Central. Kimmy Chung of the South China Morning Post reported that the protesters’ message had changed to: “Liberate Hong Kong: revolution of our times.” 

.

The Western media assumed this was something to do with furthering democracy.

.

But Hong Kong people knew the truth. This was the war-cry of violence-prone Edward Leung Tin-kei, who is well-known for at least two things: campaigning for Hong Kong independence and earning a six-year jail sentence for riot and assault, convicted by a jury of Hong Kong people.

.

.

NOBLE FEEL

.

The opening marches of the summer of discontent had a somewhat noble feel about them – many ordinary members of the public expressed an understandable concern about a law which they had been told, incorrectly, could be used to snatch anyone in Hong Kong for delivery to mainland prisons.

.

But the movement’s rapid descent into violence has likely lost it its mainstream support, and this will be further eroded by its openly anti-China stance.

.

As many Hong Kong people are pointing out, the activists claiming to fight for the city’s freedoms are adopting the stance most likely to get those freedoms removed. 

.

.

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

.

Meanwhile, the Western media’s blind, uncritical support of even the most riotous protests, while criticizing any attempts to quell them, is encouraging escalation. 

.

Worse, the media is preventing people from hearing the simple answer that the Hong Kong people have been saying remarkably consistently for the entire 22-year existence of this community:

.

We’re NOT anti-China; we’re NOT separatists; we’re NOT about to start a revolution of independence; and if that’s the position necessary for us to maintain our freedoms, we’re already there and we have never changed our minds on that. 

.

The media needs to stop taking orders from the stir-it-up political activists and start listening to the people of Hong Kong.  Liberate Hong Kong from China? Revolution? De-colonization by Donald Trump? No, thank you. We’ve never wanted that, and we don’t want it now.

.

We want to be free and we also want to be family.

 

Nury Vittachi

Worked at HK Polytechnic University

Studied at Cardiff University, 

Studied at University of Sheffield

Went to Fortismere School

Lives in Hong Kong

From Colombo, Sri Lanka

 

 

 

 

Edited by Civic2000
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6th Gear

An insightful piece by Nury Vittachi on HK. Nury is not known for his pro-China views but is honest enough as a pro-democracy journalist to point out what has gone wrong with the protest movement

A BIG FAT UNASKED QUESTION lies at the heart of Hong Kong freedom protests. And that question could be aimed squarely at this writer, who has consistently participated in protest rallies in this southern Chinese city for more than 30 years.

.

Youâre marching for lost freedomsâbut what freedoms have you lost?

.

It should be an easy question to answer. But it isnât.

.

âEr, freedom of the press?â I venture.

.

But even as I say that, I know that's not true. Today, I frequently mock Chinese authorities in print and online without fear. When I used to do that during the British era, I was in constant trouble.

.

âFreedom to protest?â

.

We clearly havenât lost that: thousands of us have attended licensed and unlicensed marches without being stopped by the authorities.

.

âLoss of the rule of law?â

.

No. The World Bankâs rating system on the rule of law saw Hong Kong given 69.9 points out of 100 in 1996, the end of the British era. Two decades later, Hong Kong people had lifted it to 93.75.

.

âFreedom of Information?â

.

Not lost. We have greater access to data (and better privacy protection) than we had in the British era.

.

âFreedom of Belief?â

.

Not lost. We welcome all major religions, including those banned in China.

.

âFreedom to choose our own leaders?â

.

Not lostâbecause we never had it. But we were offered it in 2015 and turned it down. And closer inspection of THAT story leads us to uncovering the secret rule that explains whatâs really happening in Hong Kong.

.

To understand Hong Kongâs recent history, there are six dates/ incidents you need to know:

.

DATE #1) THE UNWRITTEN RULE

.

On December 26, 2013, a group of pro-democracy group trespassers got into the Hong Kong headquarters of the PLA carrying a British colonial flag. They were widely condemned as âgang duâ â independence campaigners, or âseparatistsâ to use the mainland term.

.

Shortly afterwards, an unwritten law emerged, miasma-like, from the regular closed-door meetings between Hong Kongâs rulers and their mainland Chinese overlords.

.

This was it:

.

âBe free, but be family.â In plain English, it meant: âHong Kong can have all the freedoms it wants, AS LONG AS NO ONE PROMOTES SEPARATISM.â

.

Denunciations of independence suddenly became a regular theme for Hong Kongâs then leader, a property developer named Leung Chun-ying.

.

.

A WELCOME DEAL

.

The new rule was a very big carrot (all the freedoms you want!) and a very small stick (except for one little one!).

.

It was an excellent deal, since Hong Kong people did not want independence.

.

Not one of our major political parties favored it: All assumed the continuation of the present successful relationship.

.

.

WESTERN MEDIAâS ERROR

.

This is worth taking a moment to clarify: Foreign correspondents from the west nearly always arrive in this city with the assumption that Hong Kongers hate and fear our neighbors to the north.

.

This is not so. We have a love-hate relationship with China. We simultaneously hold âpositive and negative emotive affiliation toward national identityâ according to academic Chan Chi-kit.

.

We only seem to hate China. Hong Kongersâ favorite holiday destination is mainland China. When there are disputes over islands in the sea, Hong Kongers passionately support Chinaâs claims, some of our citizens even sailing out there to wave the flag.

.

In a thousand different business sectors across our city, Hong Kong people want more integration with mainland China, not less.

.

Hong Kong pretends to be a global tourism hub, but the reality is that we know that four-fifths of the tourists on whom our economy depends are cousins from mainland China.

.

.

DATE #2) HITTING A WALL

.

In Hong Kong, our wide freedoms continued, but the second part of the unwritten rule eventually caused a stumble on 31 August 2014. The Hong Kong public was offered universal suffrage but with a vague and annoying proviso that the candidates would needed to be checked for suitability first.

.

Outrageous! Media pundits (including the present writer) interpreted this as an unacceptable vetting procedure that would only allow pro-Beijing candidates to stand. I summarized the proposal âChoose Your Own Puppetâ.

.

This reporter joined thousands in protesting against it as part of what became known as the âumbrella movementâ.

.

.

A MISUNDERSTANDING?

But we got it wrong. We now know that Hong Kong people were being offered full universal suffrage, one-man-one-vote, with the simple proviso that we could have anyone EXCEPT an independence activist, since China felt that would spoil the present positive relationship, and go against the spirit of the Basic Law, Hong Kongâs mini-constitution.

.

And while pro-establishment politicians were not separatists, NEITHER were any of the pro-democracy leaders, such as Anson Chan, Martin Lee, and Audrey Eu.

.

Could one of them have been accepted as election candidates and won? Weâll never knowâbecause the entire scheme was rejected by pro-democracy politicians, causing an unfortunate return to the universally disliked electoral college system known locally as âthe small circle electionâ.

.

.

WE MESSED UP

.

Many people now feel that was a mistake, says Daniel Vukovich, an East Asian studies scholar in Hong Kong. What we were offered wasnât pure Western democracy but was the closest thing possible in Chinese territory.

.

This can be a touchy subject to discuss. Statistical evidence suggests that Asian âilliberalâ democracy (Hong Kong, Singapore, China) can speedily rescue people from abject poverty and give them health and wealth in a single generation.

.

Unfortunately, pure Western liberal democracy is the only societal management model acceptable to the Western mediaâyet can work extremely poorly in Asia (see India or the Philippines).

.

Vukovich warns against the âthe arrogance or presumptuousnessâ of assuming the existence of âsupposedly universal norms and political formsâ.

.

.

DATE #3) ENTER MR ROGERS

.

On October 11, 2017, a British conservative politician named Benedict Rogers, a friend of the present writer, was denied entry into Hong Kong. Many in the media, this writer included, expressed dismay.

.

But there was a story behind it. Before leaving the UK, Rogers had been warned by a contact at the Chinese embassy in London that he may be denied entry into Hong Kong.

.

He had regularly spoken and written about people wanting more freedom in Chinaâs restive edges, and this had led to him being labeled as a separatist.

.

.

DATE #4) PROMOTING INDEPENDENCE

.

On October 7 last year, a Financial Times editor, Victor Mallet, received a shorter-than-expected visa for his stay Hong Kong, a move seen as an expulsion.

.

Many interpreted this as an attack on the freedom of the press.

.

But the truth was that heâd never complained of the Hong Kong government censoring his work in any way. The trouble came purely from Malletâs decision to host a high profile speech for a Hong Kong independence campaignerâand thus break the unwritten rule.

.

Why take such a staggering risk? Before this event, Mallet had already decided to leave Hong Kong and had made arrangements to move to Paris. I know this is true, because he told me himself.

.

.

DATE #5) PUTTING FREEDOMS AT RISK

.

The present series of protests started on June 9, 2019. Naive foreign correspondents (and there are many) like to present it as a case of Teen Heroes Battle Evil Empire Over Lost Freedoms.

.

But the truth is that we havenât lost our freedoms. The âone country, two systemsâ scheme has been working extremely well, as Hong Kong barrister Simon Westbrook said in a BBC interview recently.

.

The irony of the situation is this: the messages we carry in our current protests mean that we soon might lose them. The demonstrations carry a strong underlying theme of separatismâand threaten the unwritten rule that preserves our freedoms.

.

.

DECOLONIZATION FROM CHINA

.

On June 26, protesters delivered a letter to the United States Consulate General in Hong Kong asking Donald Trump to âdecolonize Hong Kongâ from China. Protesters chanted âHong Kong is not Chinaâ as they marched.

.

Later that day, someone arrived with a big batch of posters saying âFree Hong Kong: Democracy Nowâ in English, combining a subliminal message of independence with the magic word âdemocracyâ, which guarantees sympathetic news coverage by Western media.

.

Protesters started defacing China and Hong Kong flags and symbols, and waving British and United States flags.

.

.

DATE #6) INDEPENDENT HONG KONG FLAG

.

On July 28, an âindependent Hong Kongâ flag was raised in Central. Kimmy Chung of the South China Morning Post reported that the protestersâ message had changed to: âLiberate Hong Kong: revolution of our times.â

.

The Western media assumed this was something to do with furthering democracy.

.

But Hong Kong people knew the truth. This was the war-cry of violence-prone Edward Leung Tin-kei, who is well-known for at least two things: campaigning for Hong Kong independence and earning a six-year jail sentence for riot and assault, convicted by a jury of Hong Kong people.

.

.

NOBLE FEEL

.

The opening marches of the summer of discontent had a somewhat noble feel about them â many ordinary members of the public expressed an understandable concern about a law which they had been told, incorrectly, could be used to snatch anyone in Hong Kong for delivery to mainland prisons.

.

But the movementâs rapid descent into violence has likely lost it its mainstream support, and this will be further eroded by its openly anti-China stance.

.

As many Hong Kong people are pointing out, the activists claiming to fight for the cityâs freedoms are adopting the stance most likely to get those freedoms removed.

.

.

VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

.

Meanwhile, the Western mediaâs blind, uncritical support of even the most riotous protests, while criticizing any attempts to quell them, is encouraging escalation.

.

Worse, the media is preventing people from hearing the simple answer that the Hong Kong people have been saying remarkably consistently for the entire 22-year existence of this community:

.

Weâre NOT anti-China; weâre NOT separatists; weâre NOT about to start a revolution of independence; and if thatâs the position necessary for us to maintain our freedoms, weâre already there and we have never changed our minds on that.

.

The media needs to stop taking orders from the stir-it-up political activists and start listening to the people of Hong Kong. Liberate Hong Kong from China? Revolution? De-colonization by Donald Trump? No, thank you. Weâve never wanted that, and we donât want it now.

.

We want to be free and we also want to be family.

Nury Vittachi

Worked at HK Polytechnic University

Studied at Cardiff University,

Studied at University of Sheffield

Went to Fortismere School

Lives in Hong Kong

From Colombo, Sri Lanka

Unable to praise you because just praise u recently.

 

A solid article.

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Turbocharged

Google his credential.

Omg.. I didn't expect that.

 

If someone in his position can write something like this... wtf does that say about Singapore academia and legal minds...

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Turbocharged (edited)

i wonder will some of the protestors in their desperation use more extreme method eg. lorry to ramp it thru the police line. 

China so far has been very careful not to get the PLA involved. It will just complicate their trade war with the US if PLA cramp down on the protestors cos the US & friends will be pressured to 'punish' China with sanctions. 

Edited by Silver_blade
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