Jump to content
Blueray

Food delivery firms take up third-party liability insurance

Recommended Posts

Food delivery firms take up third-party liability insurance

 

 

Pedestrians now better placed to claim for damages should they get into accident involving riders

 

Pedestrians are now better placed to claim for damages should they get into an accident involving riders from food delivery services in Singapore.

 

Deliveroo and Grab have already taken up third-party liability insurance for their riders, while a third company, Foodpanda, is looking into purchasing the insurance.

 

Early this week, Active Mobility Advisory Panel chairman Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim said his panel is considering recommending that such insurance be made mandatory for food delivery firms.

 

In a Facebook post on Monday, Dr Faishal said: "We are considering third-party liability insurance, to give more peace of mind to pedestrians and riders if an accident occurs." He said more details on the potential recommendation would be announced later.

 

Dr Faishal had said last month that his panel was concerned about reports of reckless food delivery riders who rush to make deliveries, and that it was actively looking into stronger measures to ensure that the riders are covered by third-party liability insurance.

 

Mr Steven Lim, a member of the panel and president of the Safe Cycling Task Force, said on Wednesday that while no final decision has been made on the recommendations, food delivery companies are already encouraged to take up such insurance.

 
 

He said: "The food delivery riders are the ones who actually spend a lot of time on the streets, they clock higher mileage, so the chances of them getting into an accident are actually higher than other users."

 

Both Grab and Deliveroo told The Straits Times that they had already purchased third-party liability insurance for their riders.

 

Deliveroo said all 6,000 of its riders have been covered by insurance for free since May last year.

 

"Accident insurance is applicable to riders on all vehicle types and their substitutes, while all cyclists and e-scooter riders also have access to third-party liability insurance," it said.

 

Riders are covered by insurance at a value of up to US$1.5 million (S$2.03 million) in the event that they cause injury to another person while making a delivery. The insurance would also protect the rider in cases of property damage and cover any legal costs incurred.

 

Grab, which runs GrabFood, said its riders have been covered by third-party insurance since June 14. It said the coverage aims to provide peace of mind to both pedestrians and delivery riders.

 

It did not disclose the total number of riders insured or the monetary value of the coverage.

 

Foodpanda's public relations team did not respond to ST's requests for comment, but ST understands that the company is also looking into buying third-party liability insurance for its riders.

 

Ms Lee Bee Wah, MP for Nee Soon GRC, previously suggested that third-party liability insurance be made mandatory for personal mobility device users. She told ST that the developments are a good step forward.

 

"Having mandatory insurance for (riders) could help many pedestrians feel they have at least some recourse," she said. "More importantly, food delivery companies should hold their riders accountable for any accidents, using their tracking technology if needed."

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/food-delivery-firms-take-up-third-party-liability-insurance

covers pedestrians only, no mention of cars ....  :that-dood-is-up-to-something: 

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Food delivery firms take up third-party liability insurance

 

 

Pedestrians now better placed to claim for damages should they get into accident involving riders

 

Pedestrians are now better placed to claim for damages should they get into an accident involving riders from food delivery services in Singapore.

 

Deliveroo and Grab have already taken up third-party liability insurance for their riders, while a third company, Foodpanda, is looking into purchasing the insurance.

 

Early this week, Active Mobility Advisory Panel chairman Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim said his panel is considering recommending that such insurance be made mandatory for food delivery firms.

 

In a Facebook post on Monday, Dr Faishal said: "We are considering third-party liability insurance, to give more peace of mind to pedestrians and riders if an accident occurs." He said more details on the potential recommendation would be announced later.

 

Dr Faishal had said last month that his panel was concerned about reports of reckless food delivery riders who rush to make deliveries, and that it was actively looking into stronger measures to ensure that the riders are covered by third-party liability insurance.

 

Mr Steven Lim, a member of the panel and president of the Safe Cycling Task Force, said on Wednesday that while no final decision has been made on the recommendations, food delivery companies are already encouraged to take up such insurance.

 
 

He said: "The food delivery riders are the ones who actually spend a lot of time on the streets, they clock higher mileage, so the chances of them getting into an accident are actually higher than other users."

 

Both Grab and Deliveroo told The Straits Times that they had already purchased third-party liability insurance for their riders.

 

Deliveroo said all 6,000 of its riders have been covered by insurance for free since May last year.

 

"Accident insurance is applicable to riders on all vehicle types and their substitutes, while all cyclists and e-scooter riders also have access to third-party liability insurance," it said.

 

Riders are covered by insurance at a value of up to US$1.5 million (S$2.03 million) in the event that they cause injury to another person while making a delivery. The insurance would also protect the rider in cases of property damage and cover any legal costs incurred.

 

Grab, which runs GrabFood, said its riders have been covered by third-party insurance since June 14. It said the coverage aims to provide peace of mind to both pedestrians and delivery riders.

 

It did not disclose the total number of riders insured or the monetary value of the coverage.

 

Foodpanda's public relations team did not respond to ST's requests for comment, but ST understands that the company is also looking into buying third-party liability insurance for its riders.

 

Ms Lee Bee Wah, MP for Nee Soon GRC, previously suggested that third-party liability insurance be made mandatory for personal mobility device users. She told ST that the developments are a good step forward.

 

"Having mandatory insurance for (riders) could help many pedestrians feel they have at least some recourse," she said. "More importantly, food delivery companies should hold their riders accountable for any accidents, using their tracking technology if needed."

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/food-delivery-firms-take-up-third-party-liability-insurance

covers pedestrians only, no mention of cars ....  :that-dood-is-up-to-something: 

 

 

No mentioned what happen if they run away?

Food delivery company should print some identification number on the rider tee-shirt or the " cooler bag " they carry around for easy identification. 

  • Praise 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is long overdue... But better than never.

 

Food delivery Co are business unit, and whatever vehicles used for delivery should have 3rd party insurance coverage, since these vehicles (including PMDs) spent most of the time on the road (and pavement / void decks / shopping malls), and thus have a much higher chance to be involved in accidents, the same for say taxi and other commercial vehicles.

 

Going forward, it should be mandatory for ALL PMD users to procure 3rd party insurance, for the benefit of pedestrian and other road users. To get injured by PMD is already a painful experience, and to pay for medical expenses from own pocket is a double whammy.

  • Praise 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer just banning all of them. Most won't bother with complying with the weight and speed limits, insurance companies can siam responsibilities.

  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steal shoe how?

↡ Advertisement

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer just banning all of them. Most won't bother with complying with the weight and speed limits, insurance companies can siam responsibilities.

 

They like to ride across pedestrian crossing at high speed.

Many times, I had to slam the brakes when they suddenly appear and dash across.

 

Please someone, get rid of them and their entitled mentality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They like to ride across pedestrian crossing at high speed.

Many times, I had to slam the brakes when they suddenly appear and dash across.

 

Please someone, get rid of them and their entitled mentality.

 

Ok lah. actually i would say >80% of them are actually quite considerate. Even the delivery riders. 

They are more careful with pedestrians than motorists. Cos i think many of them aren't motorists themselves or only ride motorcycles which are more agile/nimble.

They don't understand from the car motorist perspective how it is dangerous.

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think food delivery coys have to buy 3rd part health insurance also liow …

 

More than 25 Percent of Delivery Drivers Say They Taste Customers' Food, Study Finds

 

A disturbing new report indicates that more than a quarter of delivery-food drivers sample their customers' meals before dropping them off. 

The study, conducted by US Food, examined the habits of both delivery customers and drivers. It indicated a full 28 percent of delivery drivers have taken food from an order. And 54 percent confess they are often tempted by the smell of the food they're bringing to customers.

 

"We're sorry to report that sometimes, impulse gets the best of deliverers, and they violate their sacred duty by taking some of the food!" the organization said in a statement.

 

Asked if they minded if their driver took a few fries, the average response was 8.4 out of 10, with 1 signifying "no big deal" and 10 signifying "absolutely unacceptable." Not surprisingly, nearly 85 percent of respondents said they'd like restaurants to use tamper-evident lids or labels.

 

The most common complaints were a bit more expected, though: In all, 17 percent of delivery diners complained their food was not warm or fresh, while 16 percent complained the food arrived late.

But the drivers had some gripes of their own: Some 60 percent complained of receiving little or no tip, while nearly 40 percent said their customers' instructions were unclear.

 

US Food surveyed 497 American adults who identified as having worked as a deliverer for a food delivery app like UberEats, Grubhub, DoorDash, or Postmates between May 9 and 13. It also interviewed 1,518 American adults who have used the apps.

 

According to the survey, the average American has two food delivery apps on their phone and uses them up three times per month.

 

The industry is booming worldwide: Just Eat, the U.K.-based food-delivery service, just announced a proposed merger with Dutch rival Takeaway.com that would create one of the world's largest food delivery platforms. In 2018, the two services had combined orders coming to $8.1 billion.

 

Takeaway.com acquired Switzerland's Foodarena in June 2018 and snatched up Delivery Hero's Germany operations for $1.03 billion in December.

↡ Advertisement

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×