Jump to content
StreetFight3r

Widow of cabby killed in Ferrari crash scammed of 280K

Recommended Posts

A widow who lost $280,000 after handing the money to an acquaintance to make a Chinese property investment has lost her legal bid to get it back.

 

Madam Lim Choo Eng's husband died in 2012 when a Ferrari crashed into his taxi and she used some of the money she got after his death to invest in a plot of land in China, giving it to Madam Koh Siew Eng - including a $50,000 deposit within four days of meeting her.

 

When she realised she had been tricked, she tried to sue Madam Koh for a refund - but Madam Koh contended that she was just a "mouthpiece" facilitating the transaction and had transferred the money to a third party in China who granted Madam Lim a sub-lease for the plot.

 

In a judgment on Friday (Aug 23), a High Court judge dismissed Madam Lim's case, even though he found she was honest and he believed her testimony more than Madam Koh's.

 

Justice Choo Han Teck said Madam Lim's claim of misrepresentation must fail as she had not pleaded that there was a contract, oral or written, between her and Madam Koh.

 

"Although it seems to me that Lim appeared to have acted in reliance on Koh's representation, and might even have come to an agreement with her, none of that was pleaded and the court cannot write their contract for them," said the judge.

 

Justice Choo will hear arguments on costs at a later date, but said he did not think Madam Lim should have to bear any legal costs for the case.

 

Madam Lim's husband, Mr Cheng Teck Hock, died aged 52 after a speeding Ferrari crashed into his taxi at the junction of Rochor Road and Victoria Street. The Ferrari's driver, Chinese national Ma Chi, also died in the accident.

 

Mr Ma's insurers offered advance payouts for third-party claims while public donations poured in for Mr Cheng's family.

 

In 2014, Madam Lim decided to invest some money through Madam Koh. The two women became acquainted through their respective sons, who were friends.

 

Madam Lim said Madam Koh claimed to be a successful investor and offered her a joint investment opportunity to buy land in China which was to be redeveloped and sold for a profit.

 

Between March and August 2014, Madam Lim transferred more than $280,000 to Madam Koh and Madam Koh's sister.

 

In August 2014, Madam Lim and Madam Koh flew to China to meet Mr Lu Jinlin, who was supposed to lease the land from a village committee.

 

He did not show Madam Lim the land because of "bad weather" but she was assured by Mr Lu and Madam Koh that she would get a stake.

 

In March 2015, Mr Lu came to Singapore and signed a document granting Madam Lim a 70-year sub-lease for part of the land.

 

Madam Lim did not get any more information about the deal and said it was only in 2017 that she realised Madam Koh did not invest in the land.

 

Madam Koh said Madam Lim was always aware that she was only an agent; she denied having made claims about a joint investment. She said the money was transferred to Mr Lu and his family between April 2014 and October 2016.

 

Madam Lim's lawyer, Mr Renganathan Shankar, argued that Madam Koh had orchestrated the entire scheme as she was aware of Madam Lim's finances due to the publicity surrounding her husband's death.

 

He argued that Madam Lim was entitled to rescind the contract or to damages.

 

But Justice Choo said Madam Koh was not a party to the sub-lease, a contract between Madam Lim and Mr Lu.

 

The judge added that the sub-lease was "highly suspect".

 

Unfortunately, the authenticity of the document was not challenged, nor did Madam Lim check with the land owners as to whether her sub-lease was recognised.

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 3
  • Shocked 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Donated $800 to them..personally brought it down to the wake..collected the baijin from colleagues.. Pitied the wife as she had young kids to care for.. Now we know actually its not exactly a good idea to donate money in such a high profile case..on hindsight should have set up a trust fund for the kids education instead..

  • Praise 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meet 4 days liao give 50k.... Really wtf man

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not her hard earn money ma

Don't know y some women think they have the capabilities to manage money

 

Now only her kids will suffer. Anyway she can ask for more donation

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not her hard earn money ma

Don't know y some women think they have the capabilities to manage money

 

Now only her kids will suffer. Anyway she can ask for more donation

This is not the full sum she had received.

 

But yes, the manner in which it is lost is such a waste.

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is not the full sum she had received.

 

But yes, the manner in which it is lost is such a waste.

U NV know she spent it on some luxury items too or bf

 

Hope there r someone or organisation helping her to manage for her kids

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

U NV know she spent it on some luxury items too or bf

 

Hope there r someone or organisation helping her to manage for her kids

She was scammed for trying to invest, so putting in the luxury item accusation or doubts is a bit overly judgemental.

 

The part that was a pity and “wrong” is the way she trusted others and did not protect the sum carefully in the “investment”. I think she has well meaning intention to grow the money but it was just ignorance and too easily trusting nature that led to this.

 

There are numerous such scams and even more victims. We shouldn’t further condemn them, or refrain from supporting other Singaporeans in need. Perhaps what is needed is for a more organised way or helping those who receive sudden payouts from insurance, public donations etc.

Edited by Showster
  • Praise 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/24/2019 at 8:20 AM, Showster said:

She was scammed for trying to invest, so putting in the luxury item accusation or doubts is a bit overly judgemental.

 

The part that was a pity and “wrong” is the way she trusted others and did not protect the sum carefully in the “investment”. I think she has well meaning intention to grow the money but it was just ignorance and too easily trusting nature that led to this.

 

There are numerous such scams and even more victims. We shouldn’t further condemn them, or refrain from supporting other Singaporeans in need. Perhaps what is needed is for a more organised way or helping those who receive sudden payouts from insurance, public donations etc.

singapore have alot of organization is out to cheat one!!!

  • Praise 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad to hear of this. Lost husband was really bad. Have to bring up kid(s) herself and then lost so much...

  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always remember...there are no Free Lunch[Easy Money]....Alot of Scammers outside...alot from China.😅

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, awhtc said:

MAS should clamp down on such investment scams.

How to clamp down?

Won't whatever laws come out also target legitimate investments?

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is inevitable that people who get inheritance, insurance payouts or lottery tends to lose much of the money within years. Suddenly, some long lost relatives or friends will appear and start to borrow or introduce you some investment venture. Many people will feel paiseh to turn them down and alas.. There goes your money. 

  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Kusje said:

How to clamp down?

Won't whatever laws come out also target legitimate investments?

Adding to that. A lot of the people who get scammed will at the point of investing tell off who ever warned them about it that they know nothing and this was a good investment. They won't listen to reason.

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently read a book which gave some good common sense advice for the average folk.

If u receive a significant lump sum of $. Just leave it in the bank for 6 months, even if u want to invest it. Decide what to do with it after 6 months time.

Edited by Lala81
  • Praise 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most of the jackpot winner end up the same as before, if not poorer...

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Lala81 said:

I recently read a book which gave some good common sense advice for the average folk.

If u receive a significant lump sum of $. Just leave it in the bank for 6 months, even if u want to invest it. Decide what to do with it after 6 months time.

Put insai CPF la. confirm won't lose one. Gahmen will love u deep deep also 😛

Edited by Mockngbrd
  • Praise 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Mockngbrd said:

Put insai CPF la. confirm won't lose one. Gahmen will love u deep deep also 😛

Hearsay this is a one-way ticket route....

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually the not-so-rich when they suddenly get a windfall, they wouldn't know how to manage it, to grow that sum, to use it for better things.. after that will likely be poorer than before.

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Put in cpf for herself and kids at least can get enhanced retirement sum for their lives

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×