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10 Generations Of Honda Accord Show The Family Sedan's Evolution

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Turbocharged

10 Generations Of Honda Accord Show The Family Sedan's Evolution

source: https://www.motor1.com/news/446925/honda-accord-evolution/

jKPFXDA.png

It all started back in 1976.

About two years ago, a nifty set of renderings refreshed our memory about the Honda Civic’s timeline by revisiting all ten generations to show the remarkable evolution of the compact car. Fast forward to 2020, the same folks at Budget Direct Car Insurance have sent us a new batch depicting the Civic’s bigger brother – the Accord.

First Generation (1976-1981)

honda-accord-1st-generation.jpg

Much like the Civic, the larger Accord has also spawned a total of ten generations, with the original launched back in 1976. It initially came out as a three-door hatchback before the four-door sedan was introduced in 1979. Power came from a 1.6-liter with a respectable 68-hp output sent to the wheels via a five-speed manual. The sedan arrived with a beefier 1.8-liter and was also equipped with power steering.

Second Generation (1981-1985)

honda-accord-2nd-generation.jpg

The first Japanese car assembled in the United States, the second-generation Accord was larger than its predecessor and had a substantially different look with boxy styling. It gained an optional four-speed automatic gearbox in 1983 and got its engine bumped in displacement from 1751cc to 1830cc to unlock 86 hp. More oomph was added in 1985 with the arrival of the Accord SEi and its fuel-injected engine pumping out 101 hp.

Third Generation (1985-1989)

honda-accord-3rd-generation.jpg

Once again, the Accord received an increased footprint for its third iteration, which came along with a third body style in the form of a sleek coupe. It was mechanically superior to its predecessor, featuring a Honda-first double-wishbone suspension at both axles as well as a more aerodynamically friendly body. Honda increased the engine’s size furthermore, to a 2.0-liter unit with 98 hp on tap when carbureted or an optional 110 hp with fuel injection. Oh, did we mention it had pop-out headlights?

Fourth Generation (1989-1993)

honda-accord-4th-generation.jpg

With the risk of sounding like a broken record, the fourth-gen Accord was enlarged once more, fully qualifying for the midsize sedan status. Honda boosted the car’s practicality with the addition of a wagon that replaced the hatchback. A newly developed 2.2-liter engine was rated at a healthy 130 hp for the flagship EX model. There was even a sport mode for the four-speed automatic transmission, allowing the driver to choose gears manually. Sadly, it lost the nifty pop-out headlights.

Fifth Generation (1993-1997)

honda-accord-5th-generation.jpg

The fifth-gen Accord saw the addition of VTEC for the 2.2-liter engine and the sedan’s first V6, a 2.7-liter unit making 170 hp and 165 lb-ft (224 Nm). The versions equipped with the bigger engine had some design tweaks at the front to distinguish them from the four-pot models. Honda stretched the wheelbase for extra rear legroom and proposed a sportier design.

Sixth Generation (1998-2002)

honda-accord-6th-generation.jpg

No more wagon body style with the sixth-gen model, with only the coupe and sedan surviving. The two-door model was developed in North America and had a slightly shorter wheelbase than its four-door counterpart. Front airbags came as standard, with side airbags available at an additional cost. The base engine was a 2.3-liter with 135 hp, while an optional 3.0-liter V6 had 200 hp.

Seventh Generation (2002-2008)

honda-accord-7th-generation.jpg

For its seventh iteration, the Accord got more powerful engines across the range. Even the base four-cylinder unit now made 160 hp, while the 3.0-liter VTEC V6 pumped out 240 hp. Both got a little bit more power later in the life cycle when an electrified V6 was added with a combined output of 253 hp. The coupe allowed customers to order the V6 engine with a manual gearbox for the first time.

Eighth Generation (2008-2012)

honda-accord-8th-generation.jpg

Creating a greater visual differentiation between the sedan and coupe, Honda increased the Accord’s size yet again for the eighth generation. The V6 engine – now making 268 hp – was once again offered with a three-pedal setup. It was bumped to the fullsize car class by EPA, and spawned a hunchbacked Crosstour fastback for the 2010 model year for added practicality. The oddly shaped version was two inches wider than the sedan and added about 300 pounds (136 kilograms) of weight.

Ninth Generation (2013-2017)

honda-accord-9th-generation.jpg

Not necessarily a fully fledged next-generation car, the Accord Mk9 was more of a thorough refresh of its predecessor. The sedan gained a Sport variant with a standard six-speed manual and a little bit more power than the regular four-cylinder models, along with dual exhaust tips as well as bespoke wheels. Honda went back and forth with the hybrid version, which managed to get an EPA rating of 48 mpg thanks to its electrified four-cylinder engine.

Tenth Generation (2017-Present)

honda-accord-10th-generation.jpg

As for the current-generation Accord, the coupe has gone the way of the dodo together with the V6. The base 1.5-liter turbo engine is good for 192 hp while the larger 2.0-liter unit develops 252 hp, with a hybrid version also available with 212 hp. The electrified model does 48 mpg in the combined cycle. Even though it’s larger than the model it replaced, the tenth-generation model has shaved off 110 to 176 pounds (50 to 80 kilograms) depending on trim by making greater use of aluminum and ultra-high-strength steel.

honda-accord-evolution.jpg

Quote

Which one do you think is the nicest of all?

For me, it goes to the eighth gen. 🙂

 

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Supercharged (edited)
41 minutes ago, kobayashiGT said:

10 Generations Of Honda Accord Show The Family Sedan's Evolution

source: https://www.motor1.com/news/446925/honda-accord-evolution/

jKPFXDA.png

 

 

Slightly inaccurate.

Both the 7th and the 8th gen had USA and JDM versions. Both had totally different external looks, the JDM being much sportier and smaller.

7th gen above did not have pic to illustrate which version. but those who lived through the early 2000s will remember the JDM version as the most popular PI car then, with a 2.0 liter i-VTEC engine as well as a very lusted after Euro-R version with high revving VTEC engine.

image.thumb.png.1722bb639c455996bedf902731618f5f.png

 

8th gen illustrated by DirectAsia was the JDM version. The actual SG imported version was a huge barge from Thailand

image.png.387a2deae6716507ad90db128bd6cb7f.png

 

Edited by t0y0ta
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Hypersonic (edited)

My dad had the US/Thai G7 which he scrapped after 10 years. I drive the G9.

Well my maternal uncle had the G2 for 20 years, later passed to my cousin during his uni years.
He also owned the US/Thai G7, then he traded up for the US/thai G8.
Now he drives a C180. Quite amazing considering he drove the same model of car for 30+ years and only switched when he was in his 60s LOL

Lol. The very first car I have recollection of is my uncle's G2 from the 1980s.

Edited by Lala81
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4th Gear

Nice evolution to revive memories... I grew up with Gen 1 and 2 Accord during my early childhood. 

It was the first time I used power window on the gen 2 and saw an automatic gear stick (maybe 3AT or called the Hondamatic).  I remembered my father kept talking about power steering to our neighbour!!!  [laugh]  The gen 2 accorded was preceded by a Honda Prelude which had sunroof.... My father could be considered a Honda fanboy during those days.  haha

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Hypersonic

Honda Accord was the benchmark for buyers who wanted to upgrade from the b&b 1.6l cars in the old days. It was the next step up as it was too expensive to afford contis n the contis didn’t hv entry level Cat A cars unlike today. 

3series n C Class were the entry level BMW n Benz models so they were not affordable for most buyers n hence Accord was the natural progression upwards together with Toyota Corona (can say Camry predecessor). 

However, these days with Accord being 1.5l but priced at $150k range, there are much more choices at that price range n hence, this car has ceased to become desirable which is a pity as Accord has always been a reliable, spacious n adequately powered family car.

I’ve actually not even bothered to look at it anymore n it’s not even in my list of cars shld I be in the market for a $150k priced car. Honda shld seriously look at their pricing as the Accord’s slow sales may accelerate its demise I fear. Just my opinion only. 

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Hypersonic

image.png.6db094341083acebea7f415dcf3a7fc9.pngmy father used to have the 1st gen bought used. He liked it and change to the next gen after few years.

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Hypersonic
57 minutes ago, Spring said:

Honda Accord was the benchmark for buyers who wanted to upgrade from the b&b 1.6l cars in the old days. It was the next step up as it was too expensive to afford contis n the contis didn’t hv entry level Cat A cars unlike today. 

3series n C Class were the entry level BMW n Benz models so they were not affordable for most buyers n hence Accord was the natural progression upwards together with Toyota Corona (can say Camry predecessor). 

However, these days with Accord being 1.5l but priced at $150k range, there are much more choices at that price range n hence, this car has ceased to become desirable which is a pity as Accord has always been a reliable, spacious n adequately powered family car.

I’ve actually not even bothered to look at it anymore n it’s not even in my list of cars shld I be in the market for a $150k priced car. Honda shld seriously look at their pricing as the Accord’s slow sales may accelerate its demise I fear. Just my opinion only. 

haha my g9 is uncommon but at least still see some uncles driving. Got a few near where i work. Haha sometimes park near me at work, confuse me when i go to get my car. 
The g10 is rare one indeed.  Even the CRV sells lesser than it should. Given that the CRV is the 2nd top seller Crossover in american markets and sell like hotcakes in most countries. Well that's kah motors bah.

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Hypersonic
27 minutes ago, Hamburger said:

image.png.6db094341083acebea7f415dcf3a7fc9.pngmy father used to have the 1st gen bought used. He liked it and change to the next gen after few years.

i think my other uncle has this G1 accord. Though I maybe mistakened. so many years ago.

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6th Gear (edited)
2 hours ago, Fat_slayer said:

Nice evolution to revive memories... I grew up with Gen 1 and 2 Accord during my early childhood. 

It was the first time I used power window on the gen 2 and saw an automatic gear stick (maybe 3AT or called the Hondamatic).  I remembered my father kept talking about power steering to our neighbour!!!  [laugh]  The gen 2 accorded was preceded by a Honda Prelude which had sunroof.... My father could be considered a Honda fanboy during those days.  haha

Brings back sweet memories...........My Family had the Gen 2 Accord from 1982. It was a 2000cc manual transmission. 

This Accord was owned by my father, uncles, auntie.........and handover to me in 1999 during my Uni days.

My first car. I drove till 2001 and scrap it when it was beyond repair. 

1200px-Honda_Accord_1982_Bateman_Street.jpg

Edited by Mahjong74
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6th Gear

I prefer ninth over eighth as eighth is a tad elaborate in design. 

But if it is to include CL7R, its the top of my list any time 😁

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Turbocharged

I remember.  This car was pronounced as Honda AIR-cord.

And G2 was running on timing belt and not timing chain; hence need to change on schedule, else pistons will kiss the valves.

Last time in early 1980s, fish ball noodle a bowl was $1.20 to $1.50.  Pound and currencies of respective european countries were ridiculously high.  Only Dua Towkay can afford Jaguar and Mercedes.  The rest can only buy AIRcord at best.

For G2, a common color was light blue.

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Turbocharged (edited)
36 minutes ago, Albeniz said:

I remember.  This car was pronounced as Honda AIR-cord.

And G2 was running on timing belt and not timing chain; hence need to change on schedule, else pistons will kiss the valves.

Last time in early 1980s, fish ball noodle a bowl was $1.20 to $1.50.  Pound and currencies of respective european countries were ridiculously high.  Only Dua Towkay can afford Jaguar and Mercedes.  The rest can only buy AIRcord at best.

For G2, a common color was light blue.

The G2 was the era when Nissan Cedric and Toyota Crown ruled the roads, as kings of Taxi.

Edited by Albeniz

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1st Gear (edited)
16 hours ago, kobayashiGT said:

10 Generations Of Honda Accord Show The Family Sedan's Evolution

source: https://www.motor1.com/news/446925/honda-accord-evolution/

jKPFXDA.png

It all started back in 1976.

About two years ago, a nifty set of renderings refreshed our memory about the Honda Civic’s timeline by revisiting all ten generations to show the remarkable evolution of the compact car. Fast forward to 2020, the same folks at Budget Direct Car Insurance have sent us a new batch depicting the Civic’s bigger brother – the Accord.

First Generation (1976-1981)

honda-accord-1st-generation.jpg

Much like the Civic, the larger Accord has also spawned a total of ten generations, with the original launched back in 1976. It initially came out as a three-door hatchback before the four-door sedan was introduced in 1979. Power came from a 1.6-liter with a respectable 68-hp output sent to the wheels via a five-speed manual. The sedan arrived with a beefier 1.8-liter and was also equipped with power steering.

Second Generation (1981-1985)

honda-accord-2nd-generation.jpg

The first Japanese car assembled in the United States, the second-generation Accord was larger than its predecessor and had a substantially different look with boxy styling. It gained an optional four-speed automatic gearbox in 1983 and got its engine bumped in displacement from 1751cc to 1830cc to unlock 86 hp. More oomph was added in 1985 with the arrival of the Accord SEi and its fuel-injected engine pumping out 101 hp.

Third Generation (1985-1989)

honda-accord-3rd-generation.jpg

Once again, the Accord received an increased footprint for its third iteration, which came along with a third body style in the form of a sleek coupe. It was mechanically superior to its predecessor, featuring a Honda-first double-wishbone suspension at both axles as well as a more aerodynamically friendly body. Honda increased the engine’s size furthermore, to a 2.0-liter unit with 98 hp on tap when carbureted or an optional 110 hp with fuel injection. Oh, did we mention it had pop-out headlights?

Fourth Generation (1989-1993)

honda-accord-4th-generation.jpg

With the risk of sounding like a broken record, the fourth-gen Accord was enlarged once more, fully qualifying for the midsize sedan status. Honda boosted the car’s practicality with the addition of a wagon that replaced the hatchback. A newly developed 2.2-liter engine was rated at a healthy 130 hp for the flagship EX model. There was even a sport mode for the four-speed automatic transmission, allowing the driver to choose gears manually. Sadly, it lost the nifty pop-out headlights.

Fifth Generation (1993-1997)

honda-accord-5th-generation.jpg

The fifth-gen Accord saw the addition of VTEC for the 2.2-liter engine and the sedan’s first V6, a 2.7-liter unit making 170 hp and 165 lb-ft (224 Nm). The versions equipped with the bigger engine had some design tweaks at the front to distinguish them from the four-pot models. Honda stretched the wheelbase for extra rear legroom and proposed a sportier design.

Sixth Generation (1998-2002)

honda-accord-6th-generation.jpg

No more wagon body style with the sixth-gen model, with only the coupe and sedan surviving. The two-door model was developed in North America and had a slightly shorter wheelbase than its four-door counterpart. Front airbags came as standard, with side airbags available at an additional cost. The base engine was a 2.3-liter with 135 hp, while an optional 3.0-liter V6 had 200 hp.

Seventh Generation (2002-2008)

honda-accord-7th-generation.jpg

For its seventh iteration, the Accord got more powerful engines across the range. Even the base four-cylinder unit now made 160 hp, while the 3.0-liter VTEC V6 pumped out 240 hp. Both got a little bit more power later in the life cycle when an electrified V6 was added with a combined output of 253 hp. The coupe allowed customers to order the V6 engine with a manual gearbox for the first time.

Eighth Generation (2008-2012)

honda-accord-8th-generation.jpg

Creating a greater visual differentiation between the sedan and coupe, Honda increased the Accord’s size yet again for the eighth generation. The V6 engine – now making 268 hp – was once again offered with a three-pedal setup. It was bumped to the fullsize car class by EPA, and spawned a hunchbacked Crosstour fastback for the 2010 model year for added practicality. The oddly shaped version was two inches wider than the sedan and added about 300 pounds (136 kilograms) of weight.

Ninth Generation (2013-2017)

honda-accord-9th-generation.jpg

Not necessarily a fully fledged next-generation car, the Accord Mk9 was more of a thorough refresh of its predecessor. The sedan gained a Sport variant with a standard six-speed manual and a little bit more power than the regular four-cylinder models, along with dual exhaust tips as well as bespoke wheels. Honda went back and forth with the hybrid version, which managed to get an EPA rating of 48 mpg thanks to its electrified four-cylinder engine.

Tenth Generation (2017-Present)

honda-accord-10th-generation.jpg

As for the current-generation Accord, the coupe has gone the way of the dodo together with the V6. The base 1.5-liter turbo engine is good for 192 hp while the larger 2.0-liter unit develops 252 hp, with a hybrid version also available with 212 hp. The electrified model does 48 mpg in the combined cycle. Even though it’s larger than the model it replaced, the tenth-generation model has shaved off 110 to 176 pounds (50 to 80 kilograms) depending on trim by making greater use of aluminum and ultra-high-strength steel.

honda-accord-evolution.jpg

 

Some versions we had here are different from the article. 

For example the 3rd generation sold here do not have pop up headlight,

674792_1b.jpg

and the 8th generation look like this. 

760951_2b.jpg

760951_3b.jpg

Edited by SGCM928
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Supersonic (edited)

I remember a few G1 Accord in my secondary school carpark. It was a popular choice with teachers/principals.  Personally had a G2 (not here) for USD 1650. Came with hail damage on the roof too!

Indeed it was the atas choice for the small towkays!

 

Edited by Volvobrick
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5th Gear

My dad had 3 generations of of it. I had 2. 

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Twincharged

Great thread. I had the COE Gen 1 and Gen 2 Accord hatchbacks b4. Great cars, felt modern to drive and among the first cars to use FWD, and had superb refinement for jap cars at the time. 

CC-59-118-800-1.jpg

f6667c6d55f25e5b8f75ba57c2e52252.jpg

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Twincharged
22 hours ago, Spring said:

Honda Accord was the benchmark for buyers who wanted to upgrade from the b&b 1.6l cars in the old days. It was the next step up as it was too expensive to afford contis n the contis didn’t hv entry level Cat A cars unlike today. 

3series n C Class were the entry level BMW n Benz models so they were not affordable for most buyers n hence Accord was the natural progression upwards together with Toyota Corona (can say Camry predecessor). 

However, these days with Accord being 1.5l but priced at $150k range, there are much more choices at that price range n hence, this car has ceased to become desirable which is a pity as Accord has always been a reliable, spacious n adequately powered family car.

I’ve actually not even bothered to look at it anymore n it’s not even in my list of cars shld I be in the market for a $150k priced car. Honda shld seriously look at their pricing as the Accord’s slow sales may accelerate its demise I fear. Just my opinion only. 

Yeah agree. I reckon the Accord started to lose the plot from gen 6 onwards. It no longer had a leading design or any USP. Then came the tomyam Accords.....OMG

Nowadays it's even less appealing than a Camry. At least w the Camry, it still has some modern tech like hybrid and current design don't look so ah pek 

What is the current Accord known for besides a high price tag? 

 

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