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therock

Things to take note when you go for your Covid Vaccination

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Twincharged (edited)

Just sharing some tips, my friends and I learnt from our experiences.

 

First, choice:

- right now you have no other choice, and that's not a bad thing, because the Pfizer vaccine is the front runner and thus far, millions of doses have been given and the frequency of side effects has been well documented and within control. Realistically there will be some issues, even potential fatalities, but it's also important to see the details, because it may not be a direct result of the vaccine or the jab. Do it now as you might get the sinovac, unless you're up for it

- we also excel at logistics and the cold chain will be pretty much assured in SG

Location:

- if you're in healthcare, you'll probably do it in a hospital / clinic setting. That's good. If you have a choice, do it where there are resuscitation facilities. If you're going to a clinic, make sure they can rescue you if you do go into anaphylaxis

What's that you say:

"Anaphylaxis is a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. It typically causes more than one of the following: an itchy rash, throat or tongue swelling, shortness of breath, vomiting, lightheadedness, low blood pressure. These symptoms typically come on over minutes to hours."

- Timing:

Choose a day where you have a couple of days where you might have a lighter schedule

The reaction can be mild or you may have some arm ache, flu symptoms or even have more reactions. So don't schedule something heavy on the same day, or the day after. Be prepared to sleep like a log after. Avoid heavy lifting for a couple of days

Also make sure you have friends or family who can check in on you after the jab, especially those who are living alone

- What to prepare:

I'll suggest taking a panadol or NSAID before the jab, so the aches are less

- How do you feel right after:

the arm ache doesn't start immediately, but when I took it in the afternoon, you feel like the flu is coming, this happened after dinner, and I went to bed early to sleep

I woke up with a bit of soreness, and arm ache, and it continues through the day. Typically it last for a couple of days or so

- What else to bring?

Bring a camera! Take a pic of the event, share it 🙂

- you'll be monitored for about 30 min. Bring your phone and a drink, you have to pass time away, and it will be boring without a book or phone to while the time away..

- you'll get a card, keep it in your wallet. Don't put it in or fold it immediately the ink tends to run

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For others who have gone for it, do share your experiences too cheers

 

Do your part for herd immunity!

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Edited by therock
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Supersonic

Good advice overall but I advise against taking panadol or NSAID before the jab. Sometimes pain is a way for our body to communicate with us, and it's good for us to describe what goes wrong in the event something really goes wrong, though the risk is small here.

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6th Gear

https://fortune.com/2021/01/13/sinovac-vaccine-efficacy-rate-drop/

Why did the efficacy of China’s top vaccine drop from 78% to 50%?
BY GRADY MCGREGOR
January 13, 2021

Nearly one week ago, Brazilian officials sounded triumphant in announcing that the vaccine from Chinese drugmaker Sinovac was 78% effective in preventing COVID-19 infections.

“Today is the day of hope, the day of life,” João Doria, governor of Brazil's São Paulo state, said at a press conference on Jan. 7.

But at a press conference on Tuesday, officials delivered a more sobering follow-up: Sinovac's vaccine was, in fact, only 50.4% effective in preventing COVID-19 infections. The officials said that the lowered figure accounted for "very light" cases of COVID-19 among participants in the country's Phase III trial of the vaccine that had been omitted in the earlier analysis.

Sinovac's 50.4% efficacy rate in preventing COVID-19 infections is significantly lower than the 95% and 94% efficacy rates for Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccines, respectively. The lower figure reportedly came after Brazilian scientists pressured Sinovac's Brazilian partner, the Butantan Institute, to release a fuller picture of its trial results.

Ricardo Palácios, medical director of the Butantan Institute, argued that the lower efficacy rate was evidence that Sinovac's Brazil trials focused on higher risk groups than the Pfizer and Moderna trials and that the institute used more stringent standards. “We added all possible difficulties [to our trials],” he said. 

Neither Sinovac nor the Butantan Institute, however, has released full details of its trial data to the public, and Sinovac did not respond to Fortune’s request for comment on the vaccine’s new efficacy figure.

Experts tell Fortune that Sinovac’s lowered efficacy rate may not be as big a blow as it might appear, and that the vaccine may still prove a useful tool in helping bring an end to the global pandemic. At the same time, Tuesday’s announcement marks the latest in a series of inconsistent conclusions about the potency of Sinovac's vaccine, which has now produced four different efficacy results across three continents. The discordant figures, combined with the dearth of publicly available data, may make it more difficult for the company to build public confidence in its doses.

Why did the rate drop?
A vaccine efficacy's rate is calculated by comparing the number of COVID-19 infections among trial volunteers who received the vaccine versus the cases among volunteers in the placebo group. In the Brazil trial, 85 participants injected with Sinovac's vaccine developed COVID-19 infections compared to 167 who developed infections in the placebo group, creating an efficacy rate of just above 50%.

At Tuesday’s press conference, Palácios said Sinovac’s relatively low efficacy rate of 50% was due to its more rigorous standard for what counts as an infection among trial volunteers. The Butantan Institute said it included six types of cases in its results: asymptomatic, very mild, mild, two levels of moderate, and severe. (The Brazilian authorities stressed that the public should focus on the vaccine's 100% efficacy in protecting against severe cases of COVID-19.) Western vaccine makers generally included only mild, moderate, and severe categories, and companies like Pfizer are doing additional studies to see if the vaccine will prevent asymptomatic cases.

“People want to compare other studies, but that’s like comparing a person that runs a 1-kilometer race on a flat stretch and another doing it on a steep and obstacle-filled stretch,” Palácios said.

There is some evidence to back up Palácios’ claim that Brazil's trial standards are more likely to catch mild cases of COVID-19 than trials conducted elsewhere, which would result in a lower efficacy rate.

In the U.S.’s Food and Drug Administration’s evaluation of Pfizer’s vaccine trials, the agency found that there were up to 1,594 suspected but unconfirmed cases of COVID-19. Because the infections were unconfirmed, they didn't factor into the Pfizer vaccine's efficacy rate.

“It’s true that other vaccine trials have not been able to confirm as many mild infections [as Sinovac],” says Ben Cowling, an epidemiologist at the University of Hong Kong. “The [vaccine efficacy] against mild disease could be lower than 90%-95% for Moderna and Pfizer.”

Yanzhong Huang, a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, noted that Brazil’s trial was also largely made up of frontline health care workers. “They are more exposed to the virus and may explain the relatively low efficacy rate,” Huang said. Sinovac's CEO Yin Weidong made that same argument when he addressed the lower efficacy rate at a press conference on Wednesday.

Transparency
Cowling cautioned that Sinovac’s efficacy figure is still based on limited public data, and that a fuller data release is needed to fully assess the efficacy of Sinovac’s vaccine.

“I think we really need to see more comprehensive documentation before making any assessment of the vaccine performance” says Cowling. “What we have seen so far is pretty limited information.”

It's not just the new efficacy figure in Brazil and the lack of public data that's stirring confusion about how well Sinovac's vaccine works.

Turkey has claimed that Sinovac’s vaccine is 91.25% effective in preventing COVID-19 infections, and Indonesia has said it's 65% effective. (Both figures are based on interim trial data from the respective countries.)

The questions that remain about Sinovac's vaccine hasn't stopped the company from rolling it out. It has distributed jabs of the vaccine outside of clinical trials in China for months, and Indonesia used Sinovac's vaccine on Wednesday to launch a massive campaign to vaccinate 181 million people. Alongside health ministers and Indonesia’s top Muslim cleric, Indonesia President Joko Widodo received the first dose of Sinovac’s vaccine on Wednesday in a televised ceremony from his presidential palace.

But there's no guarantee that others will be as willing to take up the jab.

"[Transparency] is a concern," says Huang. "Transparency about the data, even for the interim results, could still be very important to convince people that the results were indeed trustworthy."

Even with the lingering unknowns, the vaccine may prove useful in inoculating millions of people who lack access to any alternative.

Sinovac has deals to supply lower-income countries like Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand, and its jabs, which require regular refrigeration, could serve as a lifeline for nations without the ultracold storage infrastructure needed to distribute the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.

"Initially, I was surprised by how low that efficacy rate was, but after I gave some further thought on this the 50% actually wasn’t that bad," says Huang. "It can still reduce the risk of COVID infection and be considered a game changer in the fighting of the current pandemic."

END

 

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Twincharged

If you have wives / friends who are  breastfeeding, these mums who receive the Covid-19 vaccination and decide to stop breastfeeding for a week, as advised by MOH, pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is available from the KK Human Milk Bank. This is provided FOC for Singaporeans and PRs.

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Supersonic
14 minutes ago, therock said:

If you have wives / friends who are  breastfeeding, these mums who receive the Covid-19 vaccination and decide to stop breastfeeding for a week, as advised by MOH, pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is available from the KK Human Milk Bank. This is provided FOC for Singaporeans and PRs.

Can start stocking up first. Provided freezer got space.

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Hypersonic
1 hour ago, therock said:

- How do you feel right after:

the arm ache doesn't start immediately, but when I took it in the afternoon, you feel like the flu is coming, this happened after dinner, and I went to bed early to sleep

I woke up with a bit of soreness, and arm ache, and it continues through the day. Typically it last for a couple of days or so

- What else to bring?

Bring a camera! Take a pic of the event, share it 🙂

 

 

For me. No feeling whatsoever after the jab. Still can play football later in the day. The soreness only comes in the following day. It last only 2 days and disappear. Not much pain at all. After CNY getting my second dose.

 

No photography/videography allowed in the clinic that I went to. There were visible no photography/videography signs.

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Twincharged

Nice, the nurse did a good job with the jab.

I rather get a nurse, who does it all the time.

Did you have to stop your auto-immune meds?

 

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Supersonic (edited)
40 minutes ago, Adrianli said:

For me. No feeling whatsoever after the jab. Still can play football later in the day. The soreness only comes in the following day. It last only 2 days and disappear. Not much pain at all. After CNY getting my second dose.

No photography/videography allowed in the clinic that I went to. There were visible no photography/videography signs.

I saw TikTok video of nurses taking COVID19 jab.

Ownself take ownself video

Edited by inlinesix

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Hypersonic
5 hours ago, therock said:

Nice, the nurse did a good job with the jab.

I rather get a nurse, who does it all the time.

Did you have to stop your auto-immune meds?

 

Nope. Continued with my medications as what the doctors advised.

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Hypersonic
5 hours ago, inlinesix said:

I saw TikTok video of nurses taking COVID19 jab.

Ownself take ownself video

Do anything you want but don’t get caught.

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Hypersonic

My daughter had her first jab last Sunday at Woodlands Galaxy CC.

From registration till completed the whole monitoring process only 40mins. Fast and easy.

No side effect except 2nd day hand a bit sore like any others vaccination.  3rd day ok already.

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Supersonic
2 hours ago, therock said:

We are going Moderna soon, so if you like Pzifer, now's the time to take it so you know what you're getting.

Later on it will be potluck...

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/health/side-effects-for-moderna-vaccine-similar-to-pfizers-0

 

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Cannot take even you want to if you are not ‘invited’ to go take the jab. So no choice even it is potluck.

Looks like so far no hear anyone reject to go take jab which is not due to medical or allergy reason?! 

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Twincharged
On 2/4/2021 at 11:37 AM, Weez911 said:

Good advice overall but I advise against taking panadol or NSAID before the jab. Sometimes pain is a way for our body to communicate with us, and it's good for us to describe what goes wrong in the event something really goes wrong, though the risk is small here.

There's no evidence based medicine that antipyretics affect the immune response, so it's ok

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/303716028_Effect_of_antipyretic_analgesics_on_immune_responses_to_vaccination

 

But I'll say, panadol rather than NSAIDs, since there is a chance of allergy with NSAIDs if you have not taken it before, so if you do get a reaction, it may be harder for the drs to differentiate between allergy to the vaccine vs the NSAID..

 

Having said that, rest and maybe MC is best if you don't need any meds.

 

image.thumb.png.46ed8ce2acace0a8156b87bb36cb1d3d.png

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Turbocharged

Thanks for sharing.

Also remember to ask them to check the dosage.  Someone received 5 times the norm.

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