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Egg freezing for women in sg

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Turbocharged

 

 

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/singapore-egg-freezing-ban-forces-024026447.html



With a busy job that left little time to think about starting a family, Erica decided to sidestep Singapore's ban on egg freezing for a chance to have children later in life.

The advertising executive is among a growing number of women travelling overseas to get their eggs frozen, as people in the work-obsessed city-state increasingly delay having children.

Now calls are growing for authorities to loosen the rules in a bid to help boost one of the world's lowest birth rates.

"It's quite unfair to women here," Erica, who used a pseudonym, said of the current policy on egg freezing.

"It doesn't give women in Singapore the chance to have an opportunity to give birth in their 40s, and therefore they feel like they would have to settle in their 30s because time is not on their side," the 40-year-old added.

Singapore's fertility rate reached a historic low of 1.1 babies per woman last year, compared to a global average of 2.4.

This is despite decades of official encouragement to boost births, ranging from cash bonuses for having a baby to subsidised fertility treatments for married couples.

But while advocates say egg freezing could help lift birth rates, authorities still only allow it for certain medical conditions, such as if a woman is undergoing cancer treatment.

Many other countries permit the procedure, even without medical reasons.

But in socially conservative Singapore, the government and religious groups have expressed concern that egg freezing may encourage women to delay getting married and having children.

- 'Lifestyles are different' -

The procedure involves collecting eggs from a woman's ovaries, freezing them unfertilised and storing them for later use.

When a woman wants to try to get pregnant, the egg is thawed and combined with sperm before being transferred to the uterus.

Women's fertility typically begins declining from the mid-30s but freezing eggs can give them a chance to have children later.

Erica, who is not originally from Singapore but holds permanent resident status, decided to have the procedure at the age of 36 after breaking up with her boyfriend of six years.

She flew to Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia about five times for consultations, to refill hormone jabs, then finally for the egg extraction at the KL Fertility Centre.

The clinic has seen a growing number of Singaporeans coming for the procedure and, before the coronavirus closed borders, was freezing eggs of three to six women a year from the city-state.

"There is actually a huge demand because of changing social dynamics," said Helena Lim, a doctor at the centre.

"Women have more opportunity to get higher education, lifestyles are different."

This isn't just an issue in Singapore. In many developed countries, women are delaying childbearing for several reasons, including financial considerations and career pressure.

There are no official figures on how many in Singapore have gone overseas to freeze their eggs, but anecdotal evidence suggests numbers have been rising.

Sunfert International, which has several fertility clinics across Malaysia, told AFP that enquiries and patients from Singapore were increasing by about 15 percent each year before the pandemic.

Singaporeans are also heading to countries like Thailand and Australia for the procedure.

- 'Profoundly selfish act' -

Pressure has been growing on Singapore to lift its ban for some time, but there is little sign an overhaul is imminent.

The Ministry of Social and Family Development said last year there were "ethical and social concerns" over such a move, which could cause more women "to delay marriage or parenthood".

The ministry declined requests for further comment.

The National Council of Churches of Singapore has also spoken out against elective egg freezing, calling it a "profoundly selfish act" and saying that women should instead be encouraged to have children earlier in life.

Erica is now in a relationship and hopes to have children soon -- the couple will try to conceive naturally first and have the frozen eggs as a backup.

"Having this as an option just gives women more opportunity to really settle with the person that you want to be happy with," she said of freezing her eggs.

"I feel that it's a great decision."

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Turbocharged

i wonder who the hell decided that any religious/conservative group has the right to even influence if a woman, (and her partner too) has the right to decide what to do with her/their reproductive matters?

why not just ban pork, beef... all meats.

abortion and contraceptives too....

this is ridiculous. this is a strategic matter.

 

image.png.a28feaf82fd031370002418a840d13b9.png

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Hypersonic

They keep in the freezer like this?

I keep mine in the fridge.

:D

image.png.331d1ad5df27d9efa08690879055a16f.png

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Hypersonic

I am not religious but I support the ban on condoms

and only condoms and nothing else.

:D

12 minutes ago, Playtime said:

i wonder who the hell decided that any religious/conservative group has the right to even influence if a woman, (and her partner too) has the right to decide what to do with her/their reproductive matters?

 

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Moderator

what if she decided to have baby at 60 yrs old? who is going to bear the baby for her? put inside another woman? or can sell to other who can't have baby?

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Supersonic
13 minutes ago, Jman888 said:

what if she decided to have baby at 60 yrs old? who is going to bear the baby for her? put inside another woman? or can sell to other who can't have baby?

Surrogacy exists. 

Adoption exists. 

What does it matter if the child is loved? 

This should not even be remotely controversial like same gender parenting etc.

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Turbocharged
11 minutes ago, Turboflat4 said:

Surrogacy exists. 

Adoption exists. 

What does it matter if the child is loved? 

This should not even be remotely controversial like same gender parenting etc.

i actually know of docs who are giving advise to patients on where to get freezing done.

 

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Supersonic

Once I see "Religious Group", I already know which group.

Our policy should not be decided by that 1 Group.

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Turbocharged
47 minutes ago, Jamesc said:

They keep in the freezer like this?

I keep mine in the fridge.

:D

image.png.331d1ad5df27d9efa08690879055a16f.png

ok ok... you sometimes post strange things... but this i gotta ask...

 

do people actually do this to eggs?

i imagine after defrosting the thing will be a jelly mess..

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Turbocharged
1 hour ago, Playtime said:

 

The National Council of Churches of Singapore has also spoken out against elective egg freezing, calling it a "profoundly selfish act" and saying that women should instead be encouraged to have children earlier in life.
 

It is also profoundly presumptuous and entitled that a religious Council thinks they have any say over a woman's womb and the changes and accommodations she has to make in her life to care for a child that she isn't ready for. 

They help her take care of the baby ah? CCB.

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5th Gear
13 minutes ago, Macrosszero said:

It is also profoundly presumptuous and entitled that a religious Council thinks they have any say over a woman's womb and the changes and accommodations she has to make in her life to care for a child that she isn't ready for. 

They help her take care of the baby ah? CCB.

There's nothing wrong for a religious group to think they have a say over what their followers should or should not be doing.

But stay out of influencing policy for non religious folks leh.

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Hypersonic
44 minutes ago, Playtime said:

i imagine after defrosting the thing will be a jelly mess..

 

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Supercharged
1 hour ago, Jamesc said:

They keep in the freezer like this?

I keep mine in the fridge.

:D

image.png.331d1ad5df27d9efa08690879055a16f.png

did you fertilise them already? 😂

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Hypersonic (edited)

I like those Zen people.

They never tell other people you cannot do this, you cannot do that.

Because I do this you also must do this and I do that you also  must do that.

:D

Just because some religious people must do this or that I also must do this or that? 

Just because they cannot do or this or that I also must do this or that? 

Edited by Jamesc
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Turbocharged (edited)
12 minutes ago, ToyotaShuttle said:

There's nothing wrong for a religious group to think they have a say over what their followers should or should not be doing.

But stay out of influencing policy for non religious folks leh.

If they can, it becomes an endorsement of their religion’s political clout. No harm trying, might push through. Plenty of their followers cheer them on.

Edited by Macrosszero

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Hypersonic

Good things people ALWAYS keep for themselves.

Bad things they ALWAYS shove in your face.

Communism is like this and religion is also like this.

Those Zen people always keep their lovely inner peace for themselves.

They never shove their nice inner peace in your face and shove it down your throat.

:D

That Zen inner peace must be damn shoik that's why they never share.

All tne other people that keep shoving their rules and regulation in your face and forcing down our throats cannot be that good lah.

If religious people want to shove anything in my face please let it be money.

You know that evil nasty devil's things.

I will gladly take all the evil, nasty, devil's thing money from them.

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Supersonic
17 minutes ago, ToyotaShuttle said:

There's nothing wrong for a religious group to think they have a say over what their followers should or should not be doing.

But stay out of influencing policy for non religious folks leh.

There *would* be nothing wrong if we had true freedom of speech in SillyPoor. 

But we don't. We have all kinds of sedition laws and laws preventing incitement of disaffection against simi sai. 

So since we live in SillyPoor, the answer is basically STFU and don't rock the boat, your religion is nothing special, you're nothing special. 

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