Jump to content
enzoalec92

Legendary supercar uses this cheapo $7 part from Townace van

Recommended Posts

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a38212473/cheap-part-that-starts-every-lexus-lfa/

<The $7 Part That Starts Every Lexus LFA
The Lexus LFA was one of the last supercars to use a physical key to start—and the ignition switch is shared with the lowly Tercel.

image.png.054fd963eb5a6ef70be3b83aeff30150.png

The keyed ignition switch is nearly a thing of the past. Today, even base-model economy cars are showing up with keyless push-button start. But it wasn’t so long ago that even top-end cars had traditional metal keys. One of the most recent examples is the Lexus LFA, an otherworldly supercar built from cutting-edge carbon fiber-reinforced polymer and powered by one of the best sounding engines in the history of the automobile. And yet, to start that V-10 engine, you have to twist an ignition switch with utterly humble roots.

Welcome to The Parts Department, where we follow basic car components to their strangest destinations.

Toyota part No. 84450-12200 is a keyed ignition switch that was nearly ubiquitous in the automaker’s North American products starting in the mid-Nineties. It first appeared in the dashboards of cars like the Tercel and Paseo before spreading to the rest of the Toyota and Lexus lineups over the next decade and a half. At its peak, this ignition switch was used in almost every Toyota and Lexus made in the early 2000s, before slowly dropping off as push-button ignitions were introduced.

Around 2010, it seemed like the switch was done for good in the Lexus lineup. The only Lexus left that used 84450-12200 was the aging SC 430, which was cancelled after the 2010 model year. But then our humble ignition switch reappeared in 2011, in the dashboard of Lexus’s new performance halo, the LFA. The screaming supercar’s key may have been adorned with milled metal and carbon fiber, but it operated the same tumbler found in the lowly Tercel.

image.png.e0bf127bd065dad0eaa096f793c87f28.png
The LFA’s ignition key and tumbler were dressed up with carbon fiber, but underneath was the same old part. - LEXUS

No. 84450-12200 had a much longer life in the Toyota lineup, appearing in the 4Runner up until this year (SmartKey push-button starting finally becomes standard equipment on the SUV for 2022). The ignition switch also appeared in the Scion iQ, TC and xB from 2005 to 2016, when the brand folded.

Our friendly ignition switch retails for $114.53 from Toyota and Lexus dealers, but online OEM discount stores typically sell it for just under $80. Thanks to the fact that it’s shared across so many Toyota and Lexus models, the switch is a popular item in the aftermarket, with nearly a dozen companies offering their own versions to fit. The cheapest version, from Ultra-Power, costs less than $7.

image.png.d16770b0fb2ee7ecaf3fcbcf9f2aa601.png
TOYOTA PARTS

While the North American models that use this switch are all familiar names, overseas parts catalogs show that 84450-12200 was used in a wide array of Japanese and European-market vehicles. They range from quirky MPVs like the Toyota Picnic to utilitarian vehicles like the Townace. Built from 1985 to 2007, the cab-over-engine Townace, available as a van, pickup or cube truck, is about as far as you can get from the Lexus LFA supercar—which just goes to show that, even when Toyota was building an ultra-limited-production supercar with a mid-six-figure price tag, the company still relied on its extensive parts bin for reliable, mundane components.

image.png.d3b7bb87044bc59e572f073bc25308b6.png
Toyota Townace Noah - TOYOTA

Much like the manual transmission, traditional metal ignition keys are on their way out. The LFA may have been one of the last supercars with a conventional key-switch ignition. But coincidentally, Toyota was at the forefront of a recent revolution in ignition keys, as one of the first automakers to introduce laser-cut keys. This was one of many innovations that debuted on the 1990 Lexus LS 400, the car that launched the Lexus brand in North America.

Toyota started slowly phasing out turn-key ignition in the United States in the mid-2000s. A push-button start switch appeared first on the 2004 Toyota Prius, then spread across the rest of the hybrid lineup. Today, Toyota’s start button is so widespread, it even appears in the company’s race cars: The Lexus RC F GT3 car that I work on as a pit crew member uses the same start button you’d see in a street-legal Lexus, and the Toyota GT86 TCA race car also has a production-style start button.

In today’s supercars, you start the engine with a switch, button or knob, usually made of a high-quality metal or composite that echoes the advanced materials found in the body or chassis—and activated by a gorgeously designed electronic key fob in your pocket. It’s nice to know that, not very long ago, a simple and robust key-switch ignition was able to make its way from a humble economy car all the way to the ultimate halo of the Lexus brand.>

Quote

This isn't really all that surprising, since parts-sharing has been a thing for forever. I could pull up countless others if needed, but here's another well-known example some of you may already know: https://drivemag.com/news/did-lamborghini-use-nissan-headlights-for-the-diablo

Anyway, enjoy the following video in celebration of the best sounding production car of all time! 

 

image.thumb.png.a6b6561cf4e6908dc51c7fd78f2d4f64.png

 

↡ Advertisement
  • Praise 2
  • Haha! 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Supersonic (edited)

You hiam because the ignition switch is cheap?? LoL...

If you want boutique supercar maker it has to be Koenisegg. They have a special way to start the engine.

As long as it works and is reliable it doesnt matter it is cheap imo. Furthermore Toyota is one of the biggest mass car makers. What do you expect when car models share parts? There are parts that they might be selling to other car makers. They just dont tell anyone. You will be surprised what parts other sportscars are using.

Have you seen GM/Chevy faulty ignition switch? Take some time to read what it does. It has even caused nearly a hundred deaths in the US.

https://www.vox.com/2014/10/3/18073458/gm-car-recall

It is some messy sh!t GM created. They should have bought the switch from Toyota.

 

I guess many ppl still do not know what is mass production. 

Edited by Watwheels
  • Haha! 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Supersonic

I owned lexus and toyota before, yes they share alot parts even the audio button also same. 
 

so is it worth to get lexus? Depend how u view. Ask me to buy again i wont. But my lexus ownership experience was good

  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Twincharged

worth lah for me cos badge whore mah :grin:

 

I am so proud of my M110ixDrive Competition Edition lor :XD:

 

dun play play wor...zero to century 30 seconds :yuush:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Supersonic

I guessed LFA before I even clicked. 

Only other supercar that is well known to have used a "cheapo" JDM part is the Lambo Diablo, with the Nissan 300ZX headlights. Well, cheapo is a relative term lol. But that part is way out of this price bracket.

Of course, manufacturers share plenty of parts across their models. The Ford GT supercar has lots of cheap crap from its poorer cousins. 

  • Praise 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Turbocharged

VW also shared alot of Parts,last time Bentley Keyfob is the same as VW Polo..only changed Logo.

  • Praise 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Moderator
3 hours ago, enzoalec92 said:

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a38212473/cheap-part-that-starts-every-lexus-lfa/

<The $7 Part That Starts Every Lexus LFA
The Lexus LFA was one of the last supercars to use a physical key to start—and the ignition switch is shared with the lowly Tercel.

image.png.054fd963eb5a6ef70be3b83aeff30150.png

The keyed ignition switch is nearly a thing of the past. Today, even base-model economy cars are showing up with keyless push-button start. But it wasn’t so long ago that even top-end cars had traditional metal keys. One of the most recent examples is the Lexus LFA, an otherworldly supercar built from cutting-edge carbon fiber-reinforced polymer and powered by one of the best sounding engines in the history of the automobile. And yet, to start that V-10 engine, you have to twist an ignition switch with utterly humble roots.

Welcome to The Parts Department, where we follow basic car components to their strangest destinations.

Toyota part No. 84450-12200 is a keyed ignition switch that was nearly ubiquitous in the automaker’s North American products starting in the mid-Nineties. It first appeared in the dashboards of cars like the Tercel and Paseo before spreading to the rest of the Toyota and Lexus lineups over the next decade and a half. At its peak, this ignition switch was used in almost every Toyota and Lexus made in the early 2000s, before slowly dropping off as push-button ignitions were introduced.

Around 2010, it seemed like the switch was done for good in the Lexus lineup. The only Lexus left that used 84450-12200 was the aging SC 430, which was cancelled after the 2010 model year. But then our humble ignition switch reappeared in 2011, in the dashboard of Lexus’s new performance halo, the LFA. The screaming supercar’s key may have been adorned with milled metal and carbon fiber, but it operated the same tumbler found in the lowly Tercel.

image.png.e0bf127bd065dad0eaa096f793c87f28.png
The LFA’s ignition key and tumbler were dressed up with carbon fiber, but underneath was the same old part. - LEXUS

No. 84450-12200 had a much longer life in the Toyota lineup, appearing in the 4Runner up until this year (SmartKey push-button starting finally becomes standard equipment on the SUV for 2022). The ignition switch also appeared in the Scion iQ, TC and xB from 2005 to 2016, when the brand folded.

Our friendly ignition switch retails for $114.53 from Toyota and Lexus dealers, but online OEM discount stores typically sell it for just under $80. Thanks to the fact that it’s shared across so many Toyota and Lexus models, the switch is a popular item in the aftermarket, with nearly a dozen companies offering their own versions to fit. The cheapest version, from Ultra-Power, costs less than $7.

image.png.d16770b0fb2ee7ecaf3fcbcf9f2aa601.png
TOYOTA PARTS

While the North American models that use this switch are all familiar names, overseas parts catalogs show that 84450-12200 was used in a wide array of Japanese and European-market vehicles. They range from quirky MPVs like the Toyota Picnic to utilitarian vehicles like the Townace. Built from 1985 to 2007, the cab-over-engine Townace, available as a van, pickup or cube truck, is about as far as you can get from the Lexus LFA supercar—which just goes to show that, even when Toyota was building an ultra-limited-production supercar with a mid-six-figure price tag, the company still relied on its extensive parts bin for reliable, mundane components.

image.png.d3b7bb87044bc59e572f073bc25308b6.png
Toyota Townace Noah - TOYOTA

Much like the manual transmission, traditional metal ignition keys are on their way out. The LFA may have been one of the last supercars with a conventional key-switch ignition. But coincidentally, Toyota was at the forefront of a recent revolution in ignition keys, as one of the first automakers to introduce laser-cut keys. This was one of many innovations that debuted on the 1990 Lexus LS 400, the car that launched the Lexus brand in North America.

Toyota started slowly phasing out turn-key ignition in the United States in the mid-2000s. A push-button start switch appeared first on the 2004 Toyota Prius, then spread across the rest of the hybrid lineup. Today, Toyota’s start button is so widespread, it even appears in the company’s race cars: The Lexus RC F GT3 car that I work on as a pit crew member uses the same start button you’d see in a street-legal Lexus, and the Toyota GT86 TCA race car also has a production-style start button.

In today’s supercars, you start the engine with a switch, button or knob, usually made of a high-quality metal or composite that echoes the advanced materials found in the body or chassis—and activated by a gorgeously designed electronic key fob in your pocket. It’s nice to know that, not very long ago, a simple and robust key-switch ignition was able to make its way from a humble economy car all the way to the ultimate halo of the Lexus brand.>

 

This only teaches me one thing. even if you are cheapo and weak, you can also shine. 😂

  • Praise 1
  • Haha! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5th Gear (edited)
5 hours ago, enzoalec92 said:

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a38212473/cheap-part-that-starts-every-lexus-lfa/

<The $7 Part That Starts Every Lexus LFA
The Lexus LFA was one of the last supercars to use a physical key to start—and the ignition switch is shared with the lowly Tercel.

image.png.054fd963eb5a6ef70be3b83aeff30150.png

The keyed ignition switch is nearly a thing of the past. Today, even base-model economy cars are showing up with keyless push-button start. But it wasn’t so long ago that even top-end cars had traditional metal keys. One of the most recent examples is the Lexus LFA, an otherworldly supercar built from cutting-edge carbon fiber-reinforced polymer and powered by one of the best sounding engines in the history of the automobile. And yet, to start that V-10 engine, you have to twist an ignition switch with utterly humble roots.

Welcome to The Parts Department, where we follow basic car components to their strangest destinations.

Toyota part No. 84450-12200 is a keyed ignition switch that was nearly ubiquitous in the automaker’s North American products starting in the mid-Nineties. It first appeared in the dashboards of cars like the Tercel and Paseo before spreading to the rest of the Toyota and Lexus lineups over the next decade and a half. At its peak, this ignition switch was used in almost every Toyota and Lexus made in the early 2000s, before slowly dropping off as push-button ignitions were introduced.

Around 2010, it seemed like the switch was done for good in the Lexus lineup. The only Lexus left that used 84450-12200 was the aging SC 430, which was cancelled after the 2010 model year. But then our humble ignition switch reappeared in 2011, in the dashboard of Lexus’s new performance halo, the LFA. The screaming supercar’s key may have been adorned with milled metal and carbon fiber, but it operated the same tumbler found in the lowly Tercel.

image.png.e0bf127bd065dad0eaa096f793c87f28.png
The LFA’s ignition key and tumbler were dressed up with carbon fiber, but underneath was the same old part. - LEXUS

No. 84450-12200 had a much longer life in the Toyota lineup, appearing in the 4Runner up until this year (SmartKey push-button starting finally becomes standard equipment on the SUV for 2022). The ignition switch also appeared in the Scion iQ, TC and xB from 2005 to 2016, when the brand folded.

Our friendly ignition switch retails for $114.53 from Toyota and Lexus dealers, but online OEM discount stores typically sell it for just under $80. Thanks to the fact that it’s shared across so many Toyota and Lexus models, the switch is a popular item in the aftermarket, with nearly a dozen companies offering their own versions to fit. The cheapest version, from Ultra-Power, costs less than $7.

image.png.d16770b0fb2ee7ecaf3fcbcf9f2aa601.png
TOYOTA PARTS

While the North American models that use this switch are all familiar names, overseas parts catalogs show that 84450-12200 was used in a wide array of Japanese and European-market vehicles. They range from quirky MPVs like the Toyota Picnic to utilitarian vehicles like the Townace. Built from 1985 to 2007, the cab-over-engine Townace, available as a van, pickup or cube truck, is about as far as you can get from the Lexus LFA supercar—which just goes to show that, even when Toyota was building an ultra-limited-production supercar with a mid-six-figure price tag, the company still relied on its extensive parts bin for reliable, mundane components.

image.png.d3b7bb87044bc59e572f073bc25308b6.png
Toyota Townace Noah - TOYOTA

Much like the manual transmission, traditional metal ignition keys are on their way out. The LFA may have been one of the last supercars with a conventional key-switch ignition. But coincidentally, Toyota was at the forefront of a recent revolution in ignition keys, as one of the first automakers to introduce laser-cut keys. This was one of many innovations that debuted on the 1990 Lexus LS 400, the car that launched the Lexus brand in North America.

Toyota started slowly phasing out turn-key ignition in the United States in the mid-2000s. A push-button start switch appeared first on the 2004 Toyota Prius, then spread across the rest of the hybrid lineup. Today, Toyota’s start button is so widespread, it even appears in the company’s race cars: The Lexus RC F GT3 car that I work on as a pit crew member uses the same start button you’d see in a street-legal Lexus, and the Toyota GT86 TCA race car also has a production-style start button.

In today’s supercars, you start the engine with a switch, button or knob, usually made of a high-quality metal or composite that echoes the advanced materials found in the body or chassis—and activated by a gorgeously designed electronic key fob in your pocket. It’s nice to know that, not very long ago, a simple and robust key-switch ignition was able to make its way from a humble economy car all the way to the ultimate halo of the Lexus brand.>

 

cheap but the KEY is, it is still  very reliable! 

Being cheap and do recall due to low quality QC then is really CHEAP!! 🤣🤣🤣

https://www.cnbc.com/2014/02/11/aston-martin-recall-highlights-risk-of-china-parts-supply.html

 

The source of Aston Martin’s recall “is precisely why we don’t procure much in China”, especially from Chinese-owned component makers, a China-based senior Toyota Motor executive told Reuters. He declined to be named because of the sensitive nature of the issue.

(Read more: Tesla cars are worth more used than new)

Toyota, which has extensive manufacturing activities in China, buys most critical components from China-based units of Japanese and other global parts producers. In some cases it brings in materials directly from Japan, the Toyota official said.

“There is risk in expanding our procurement reach within China,” the official said. “When we do buy from Chinese suppliers, we do so only after starting small with a simpler component and taking time to nurture them.”

A Toyota spokeswoman in Tokyo declined to comment on issues related to the Aston Martin recall.

Edited by D3badge
  • Praise 1
  • Haha! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, D3badge said:

cheap but the KEY is, it is still  very reliable! 

Being cheap and do recall due to low quality QC then is really CHEAP!! 🤣🤣🤣

https://www.cnbc.com/2014/02/11/aston-martin-recall-highlights-risk-of-china-parts-supply.html

 

The source of Aston Martin’s recall “is precisely why we don’t procure much in China”, especially from Chinese-owned component makers, a China-based senior Toyota Motor executive told Reuters. He declined to be named because of the sensitive nature of the issue.

(Read more: Tesla cars are worth more used than new)

Toyota, which has extensive manufacturing activities in China, buys most critical components from China-based units of Japanese and other global parts producers. In some cases it brings in materials directly from Japan, the Toyota official said.

“There is risk in expanding our procurement reach within China,” the official said. “When we do buy from Chinese suppliers, we do so only after starting small with a simpler component and taking time to nurture them.”

A Toyota spokeswoman in Tokyo declined to comment on issues related to the Aston Martin recall.

3 years later in 2017 they recall again.....KNN never learn "once beaten twice shy"!

James Bonds 😭 need the car, but cannot find because he parked on a slope

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/12/25/business/corporate-business/aston-martin-maker-200000-cars-recall-6500-vehicles-u-s-china/

  • Haha! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Turbocharged

The part is $7, after decoration cost $70 mah, if not then how to have all the designers working on the car and how the car will look like without those designers. 😂

  • Haha! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Supersonic (edited)

LFA with that Yamaha-tuned V10.

Love it.

It is 1 of noticeable car from Lexus

Edited by inlinesix
  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2nd Gear (edited)
21 hours ago, Watwheels said:

You hiam because the ignition switch is cheap?? LoL...

If you want boutique supercar maker it has to be Koenisegg. They have a special way to start the engine.

As long as it works and is reliable it doesnt matter it is cheap imo. Furthermore Toyota is one of the biggest mass car makers. What do you expect when car models share parts? There are parts that they might be selling to other car makers. They just dont tell anyone. You will be surprised what parts other sportscars are using.

Have you seen GM/Chevy faulty ignition switch? Take some time to read what it does. It has even caused nearly a hundred deaths in the US.

https://www.vox.com/2014/10/3/18073458/gm-car-recall

It is some messy sh!t GM created. They should have bought the switch from Toyota.

 

I guess many ppl still do not know what is mass production. 

@Watwheels Yo chill bruv, I'm not hiam-ing at all; even if I was, I don't have the right to, since I can't even afford a NA Miata LOL. The point of the title was merely to attract readers to content I thought was interesting and worth sharing. Seeing how you're the first to reply, it's clearly done its job.

In any case, it seems like you probably missed my following remarks, which I included within the original post just after the article's copypasta:

21 hours ago, enzoalec92 said:

This isn't really all that surprising, since parts-sharing has been a thing for forever. I could pull up countless others if needed, but here's another well-known example some of you may already know: https://drivemag.com/news/did-lamborghini-use-nissan-headlights-for-the-diablo

Also, see my reply to @Turboflat4 below about the various other examples I'm aware of, if you're interested in them yourself.

Ultimately, my aim for this thread was just to celebrate the best-sounding supercar of all time, cheap ignition switch or not. More people need to hear it at full tilt, which is why I've also linked the video I did together with my remarks you missed.

20 hours ago, Thaiyotakamli said:

I owned lexus and toyota before, yes they share alot parts even the audio button also same. 
 

so is it worth to get lexus? Depend how u view. Ask me to buy again i wont. But my lexus ownership experience was good

@Thaiyotakamli Yep, Richard Hammond perfectly encapsulated their dedication to build quality in this introductory part of his review for the LFAhttps://youtu.be/zrLocZavR6g?t=25

For an in-depth journey into how meticulously Lexus engineered the LFA however, Mark Sanew has done the best job, hands down: 

 

18 hours ago, Turboflat4 said:

I guessed LFA before I even clicked. 

Only other supercar that is well known to have used a "cheapo" JDM part is the Lambo Diablo, with the Nissan 300ZX headlights. Well, cheapo is a relative term lol. But that part is way out of this price bracket.

Of course, manufacturers share plenty of parts across their models. The Ford GT supercar has lots of cheap crap from its poorer cousins. 

@Turboflat4 Good on you for guessing it correctly! Then again, it's not all that difficult to deduce it's the LFA with the mention of the Townace. After all, it's the only supercar Toyota has made apart from the 2000GT, which ceased production over 50 years ago!

And yes, I posted a link about the Diablo/Z32 headlights in my remarks just after the first post's article copypasta. Parts-sharing has been a thing for decades — a century even — since Henry Ford first introduced the production line back in 1913. Here are yet more examples of supercars koping bits from the parts bin if you're interested: https://www.hotcars.com/surprising-examples-of-supercars-sharing-parts-with-beaters/

For a super obscure example, Doug Demuro also recently did an episode on the so-successful-it-got-banned Consulier GTP which raced in IMSA. It "stole" the entire bumper assembly from the Chevy El Camino (4:57) and pedals from a period Volkswagen (17:55): 

 

15 hours ago, D3badge said:

cheap but the KEY is, it is still  very reliable! 

Being cheap and do recall due to low quality QC then is really CHEAP!! 🤣🤣🤣

https://www.cnbc.com/2014/02/11/aston-martin-recall-highlights-risk-of-china-parts-supply.html

 

The source of Aston Martin’s recall “is precisely why we don’t procure much in China”, especially from Chinese-owned component makers, a China-based senior Toyota Motor executive told Reuters. He declined to be named because of the sensitive nature of the issue.

(Read more: Tesla cars are worth more used than new)

Toyota, which has extensive manufacturing activities in China, buys most critical components from China-based units of Japanese and other global parts producers. In some cases it brings in materials directly from Japan, the Toyota official said.

“There is risk in expanding our procurement reach within China,” the official said. “When we do buy from Chinese suppliers, we do so only after starting small with a simpler component and taking time to nurture them.”

A Toyota spokeswoman in Tokyo declined to comment on issues related to the Aston Martin recall.

 

15 hours ago, D3badge said:

3 years later in 2017 they recall again.....KNN never learn "once beaten twice shy"!

James Bonds 😭 need the car, but cannot find because he parked on a slope

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/12/25/business/corporate-business/aston-martin-maker-200000-cars-recall-6500-vehicles-u-s-china/

@D3badge As always, this comes back to the notorious Chinese manufacturing and quality control philosophy of chabuduo (差不多): https://aeon.co/essays/what-chinese-corner-cutting-reveals-about-modernity

17 hours ago, kobayashiGT said:

This only teaches me one thing. even if you are cheapo and weak, you can also shine. 😂

 

6 hours ago, Arogab said:

The part is $7, after decoration cost $70 mah, if not then how to have all the designers working on the car and how the car will look like without those designers. 😂

@kobayashiGT @Arogab It's all about knowing where's the right place to cut corners, just like that of Rainbow Road in Mario Kart: https://www.polygon.com/2021/1/14/22230905/mario-kart-wii-rainbow-road-speedrun-ultra-shortcut-arthur

5 hours ago, inlinesix said:

LFA with that Yamaha-tuned V10.

Love it.

It is 1 of noticeable car from Lexus

@inlinesix Indeed, those who know how much work — and initial wasted effort — went into this car understand just how special it is!

Edited by enzoalec92
Link change
  • Praise 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Turbocharged

I don't use the words "cut corners". I use the word "able to present yourself"......Every flower is cheaply priced, why at Valentines Day, they are more expensive. It is all about presenting

  • Haha! 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Supersonic
27 minutes ago, enzoalec92 said:

@Watwheels Yo chill bruv, I'm not hiam-ing at all; even if I was, I don't have the right to, since I can't even afford a NA Miata LOL. The point of the title was merely to attract readers to content I thought was interesting and worth sharing. Seeing how you're the first to reply, it's clearly done its job.

In any case, it seems like you probably missed my following remarks, which I included within the original post just after the article's copypasta:

Also, see my reply to @Turboflat4 below about the various other examples I'm aware of, if you're interested in them yourself.

Ultimately, my aim for this thread was just to celebrate the best-sounding supercar of all time, cheap ignition switch or not. More people need to hear it at full tilt, which is why I've also linked the video I did together with my remarks you missed.

@Thaiyotakamli Yep, Richard Hammond perfectly encapsulated their dedication to build quality in this introductory part of his review for the LFAhttps://youtu.be/zrLocZavR6g?t=25

For an in-depth journey into how meticulously Lexus engineered the LFA however, Mark Sanew has done the best job, hands down: 

 

@Turboflat4 Good on you for guessing it correctly! Then again, it's not all that difficult to deduce it's the LFA with the mention of the Townace. After all, it's the only supercar Toyota has made apart from the 2000GT, which ceased production over 50 years ago!

And yes, I posted a link about the Diablo/Z32 headlights in my remarks just after the first post's article copypasta. Parts-sharing has been a thing for decades — a century even — since Henry Ford first introduced the production line back in 1913. Here are yet more examples of supercars koping bits from the parts bin if you're interested: https://www.hotcars.com/surprising-examples-of-supercars-sharing-parts-with-beaters/

For a super obscure example, Doug Demuro also recently did an episode on the so-successful-it-got-banned Consulier GTP which raced in IMSA. It "stole" the entire bumper assembly from the Chevy El Camino (4:55) and pedals from a period Volkswagen (17:55): 

 

 

@D3badge As always, this comes back to the notorious Chinese manufacturing and quality control philosophy of chabuduo (差不多): https://aeon.co/essays/what-chinese-corner-cutting-reveals-about-modernity

 

@kobayashiGT @Arogab It's all about knowing where's the right place to cut corners, just like that of Rainbow Road in Mario Kart: https://www.polygon.com/2021/1/14/22230905/mario-kart-wii-rainbow-road-speedrun-ultra-shortcut-arthur

@inlinesix Indeed, those who know how much work — and initial wasted effort — went into this car understand just how special it is!

Thanks. Yes, not difficult to guess right. Good article although I personally wouldn't consider those Lotus models "supercars". Good sports cars, yes, supercars...eh... probably not. But in any case, Lotus is a special case. They've gone and raided the parts bin of Toyota, Kia and Isuzu for the beating hearts of their sports cars (the engines). After that, who's really gonna quibble about shared tail lights. 

Anyway, don't let the negativity get you down. No biggie here. 

  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2nd Gear (edited)
40 minutes ago, Turboflat4 said:

Thanks. Yes, not difficult to guess right. Good article although I personally wouldn't consider those Lotus models "supercars". Good sports cars, yes, supercars...eh... probably not. But in any case, Lotus is a special case. They've gone and raided the parts bin of Toyota, Kia and Isuzu for the beating hearts of their sports cars (the engines). After that, who's really gonna quibble about shared tail lights. 

Anyway, don't let the negativity get you down. No biggie here. 

The Elise is certainly "just" a highly proficient sports car but the Esprit was arguably branded a supercar in its time due to its Giugiaro "wedge" heritage. Furthermore, it competed against the aforementioned Consulier GTP in the Bridgestone Supercar class in IMSA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IMSA#IMSA_Bridgestone_Supercar_Championship. That being said, looking at the other entries within this same class comprised of C4s, FDs and Z32s, the term "supercar" was very loosely applied LOL.

But yeah, the tragic financial background of Lotus means they've had to raid just about everyone else's inventory, although they've somehow managed to still keep putting out desirable — but at times of questionable build quality — cars all these years. Their final ICE product, the Emira, has really stepped things up though, now that they have access to Geely's deep pockets!

And no worries, I wasn't trying to fight back or anything. I just wanted to clear the air on the reasoning behind my "clickbaity" but accurate title. Ultimately, I just wanted more eyes on a piece of automotive trivia some might be interested to know!

Edited by enzoalec92
Link not showing properly
  • Praise 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×