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  1. This afternoon, went to makan. Going back to my car in an open carpark, there was a man surreptitiously taking photo of my car. I ran up and shouted at him, and ask him why he was taking photo of my car(2018 Q7). He claims he wants the chassis code(he showed me what he was taking) as he sells VW and Audi parts. I was like "huh??" He looked really nervous and scared, or maybe i was fierce i dunno. I have captured the video of him taking photo of my car as well as the carplate of the white VW MPV he was driving. I told him to delete it, as i was quite suspicious of what he was trying to do. Do any bros/sis have any inkling what he was doing?? I am curious and piqued, as his story doesn't quite make sense to me..
  2. You are in the right section, since it is about auto manufacturer... It is not uncommon for large corporation to venture into businesses that is not directly related to what they are best known for, such as Fujitsu and Hitachi have gone into agriculture business (high tech farming), or for that matter, Nokia started off as a manufacturer of toilet paper, Geely with fridge, etc. For a start, let make a guess what is this item number for, under VW's official part list? 199 398 500 A (siting right between the wiper blades and lug nuts)? Nope, it is not bumper, headlight, engine oil, key chain or stuffed toy, but something edible. And nope, not the coffee or biscuit you had while waiting for your car to be service, but something that is very much popular in western... ... ... ... First created in 1973, Volkswagen has made its own currywurst sausage ever since, and in the process turned it into a symbol of the company throughout Europe. While it’s a staple of the factory cafeterias in Wolfsburg and other European Volkswagen plants for breakfast or lunch, it’s also sold in grocery stores under the “Volkswagen Originalteil” (German for “original parts”) brand. Dealers in Germany often give five-packs of them to customers as gifts. And it’s a huge hit: last year, Volkswagen made 6.8 million currywursts – more than the number of vehicles the VW brand sold worldwide in 2017. What does the VW currywurst taste like? To an American palate accustomed to bratwursts and other sausages typically labeled “sweet” or “hot,” the currywurst walks the broad space in between. There’s a strong yellow curry flavor, but with a kick from the pepper and ginger in the spices. The actual recipe, as devised by the original Volkswagen butchers in 1973, is an official company secret known only to a few people. It’s typically served either intact or chopped into bite-size slices on a paper bowl and drenched in ketchup – preferably the curry-flavored variety also made to Volkswagen’s recipe. Since its inception, the currywurst has been made in-house by Volkswagen employees. Today, about 30 workers, most of them trained butchers, oversee the process at VW’s flagship plant in Wolfsburg. Three times a week, the plant takes in fresh pork from nearby farms and grinds choice cuts into a precise mix. “Our currywurst has a fat content of only 20 percent. Normally, it’s around 35 percent,” explains Head Butcher Franco Lo Presti, who has been making VW currywurst since 1979. After mixing in the spices and packed into casings, the sausages are dried, smoked over beechwood and steamed for 100 minutes at 176 degrees. The final product is weighed, inspected and packaged for shipping to other Volkswagen plans or retailers, with a typical output of 18,000 sausages a day. For those workers who don’t prefer meat, VW has also made a vegetarian variant since 2010. And VW also made their own ketchup...
  3. Taken from another website....i really have doubt but wait..how much collected from entrance yearly have not been reported. This will roughly be the gauge on whether there is an increase or not....imo No increase in gambling addiction after casinos opened 28 Mar 2018 09:00 The setting up of the two casinos here in 2010 did not lead to more Singaporeans getting hooked on gambling, as many had feared before they opened at Marina Bay Sands and Resorts World Sentosa. The pathological and problem gambling rate among Singaporeans and permanent residents was 0.9 per cent in the 2017 survey by the National Council on Problem Gambling. It inched up from 0.7 per cent in the 2014 survey, but the change is not statistically significant, the council's spokesman said. The survey is done every three years to find out the extent and pattern of gambling here. The latest study was released yesterday. In fact, gambling addiction rates have been falling since the first survey in 2005 - way before the casinos opened, checks by The Straits Times have found. In the 2005 study, the addiction rate was 4.1 per cent, and this fell to 2.9 per cent in the 2008 survey and to 2.6 per cent in the 2011 study. Pathological gambling is more serious than problem gambling.
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