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  1. https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a38212473/cheap-part-that-starts-every-lexus-lfa/ <The $7 Part That Starts Every Lexus LFA The Lexus LFA was one of the last supercars to use a physical key to start—and the ignition switch is shared with the lowly Tercel. The keyed ignition switch is nearly a thing of the past. Today, even base-model economy cars are showing up with keyless push-button start. But it wasn’t so long ago that even top-end cars had traditional metal keys. One of the most recent examples is the Lexus LFA, an otherworldly supercar built from cutting-edge carbon fiber-reinforced polymer and powered by one of the best sounding engines in the history of the automobile. And yet, to start that V-10 engine, you have to twist an ignition switch with utterly humble roots. Welcome to The Parts Department, where we follow basic car components to their strangest destinations. Toyota part No. 84450-12200 is a keyed ignition switch that was nearly ubiquitous in the automaker’s North American products starting in the mid-Nineties. It first appeared in the dashboards of cars like the Tercel and Paseo before spreading to the rest of the Toyota and Lexus lineups over the next decade and a half. At its peak, this ignition switch was used in almost every Toyota and Lexus made in the early 2000s, before slowly dropping off as push-button ignitions were introduced. Around 2010, it seemed like the switch was done for good in the Lexus lineup. The only Lexus left that used 84450-12200 was the aging SC 430, which was cancelled after the 2010 model year. But then our humble ignition switch reappeared in 2011, in the dashboard of Lexus’s new performance halo, the LFA. The screaming supercar’s key may have been adorned with milled metal and carbon fiber, but it operated the same tumbler found in the lowly Tercel. The LFA’s ignition key and tumbler were dressed up with carbon fiber, but underneath was the same old part. - LEXUS No. 84450-12200 had a much longer life in the Toyota lineup, appearing in the 4Runner up until this year (SmartKey push-button starting finally becomes standard equipment on the SUV for 2022). The ignition switch also appeared in the Scion iQ, TC and xB from 2005 to 2016, when the brand folded. Our friendly ignition switch retails for $114.53 from Toyota and Lexus dealers, but online OEM discount stores typically sell it for just under $80. Thanks to the fact that it’s shared across so many Toyota and Lexus models, the switch is a popular item in the aftermarket, with nearly a dozen companies offering their own versions to fit. The cheapest version, from Ultra-Power, costs less than $7. TOYOTA PARTS While the North American models that use this switch are all familiar names, overseas parts catalogs show that 84450-12200 was used in a wide array of Japanese and European-market vehicles. They range from quirky MPVs like the Toyota Picnic to utilitarian vehicles like the Townace. Built from 1985 to 2007, the cab-over-engine Townace, available as a van, pickup or cube truck, is about as far as you can get from the Lexus LFA supercar—which just goes to show that, even when Toyota was building an ultra-limited-production supercar with a mid-six-figure price tag, the company still relied on its extensive parts bin for reliable, mundane components. Toyota Townace Noah - TOYOTA Much like the manual transmission, traditional metal ignition keys are on their way out. The LFA may have been one of the last supercars with a conventional key-switch ignition. But coincidentally, Toyota was at the forefront of a recent revolution in ignition keys, as one of the first automakers to introduce laser-cut keys. This was one of many innovations that debuted on the 1990 Lexus LS 400, the car that launched the Lexus brand in North America. Toyota started slowly phasing out turn-key ignition in the United States in the mid-2000s. A push-button start switch appeared first on the 2004 Toyota Prius, then spread across the rest of the hybrid lineup. Today, Toyota’s start button is so widespread, it even appears in the company’s race cars: The Lexus RC F GT3 car that I work on as a pit crew member uses the same start button you’d see in a street-legal Lexus, and the Toyota GT86 TCA race car also has a production-style start button. In today’s supercars, you start the engine with a switch, button or knob, usually made of a high-quality metal or composite that echoes the advanced materials found in the body or chassis—and activated by a gorgeously designed electronic key fob in your pocket. It’s nice to know that, not very long ago, a simple and robust key-switch ignition was able to make its way from a humble economy car all the way to the ultimate halo of the Lexus brand.>
  2. Tom_kkh

    Lfa on singapore road

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=playe...p;v=5SWmSxDxcw0
  3. The Lexus LFA has got to be one of the greatest car ever made - simply because of how technologically insane it was, but more significantly, how the V10 sounded like an early 90s F1 car. It has been over two years now that BMW and Toyota come to an agreement to work together and share technological resources to make a car that will set the pace for future cars. But ever since - there has been no work seen between the two automotive giants but recent rumours claim that the two companies are actually working on an LFA successor. With the intention on putting up against cars like the Porsche 918 Spyder and McLaren P1 - the aforementioned LFA successor will likely be a hybrid filled with lithium-ion batteries but don’t despair because that isn’t such a bad thing. Instead of looking at the hybrid system as an ecological way to save the environment, we prefer to look at it as a power boost to the engine, making it go even faster! We heard the Japanese also plan to drop BMW’s 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8 into this supercar and tag it with Toyota’s hybrid system to create a combination made in heaven. No doubt - we can expect the successor to be flourished in excess of carbon fibre and lightweight materials everywhere, making it absolutely exotic! We can’t wait to see this coming along quickly and an addition to the list of hybrid hypercars on the road nowadays. Cross your fingers though, and hope that this car will not be as ridiculously expensive as the LFA.
  4. RchLuvSlly

    Lexus LFA crashes in China

    [extract] To build this particular model dubbed the LFA, the luxury division under Toyota, Lexus, took a whole decade. That's not to mention the additional ten days required to find blemishes the model might potentially carry. However, it seems that the Chinese don
  5. FaezClutchless

    Is Lexus working on an LFA successor?

    The Lexus LFA is most definitely the first Japanese exotic supercar. Produced with a limited run of only 500 the car is Filled with incredible automotive technology and at almost S$1.25million, is an extremely expensive Toyota. Only a handful was brought into Singapore (around four units, if I am not wrong), and even if you have the cash to buy one, you probably would not get the chance to own one due to its scarcity. But don
  6. Traveling in the Lexus LFA will soon get a lot better for some of the vehicle's owners, thanks to a new dedicated line of travel cases designed to fit perfectly in the boot area of the US$375,000 Japanese supercar. Created in partnership with Tumi, a New Jersey-based manufacturer of travel bags and suitcases, the two-piece luggage set will accompany the LFA in selected markets, including the US and Europe. The Tumi cases are styled using components that mimic the appearance of the LFA, such as aluminum and carbon fiber-like materials. Each bag will be inscribed with the vehicle identification number (VIN) corresponding to the owner's LFA. Lexus said that each case is designed with a distinct purpose - the smaller piece sized to fit the essentials for track racing such as gloves and shoes or items for a quick getaway while the larger one for longer trips. The first deliveries of the 552HP V10-powered Lexus LFA will be begin January next year. Production will be limited to a total of 500 units worldwide, with around 20 cars scheduled to be built each month.
  7. Toyota has decided to enter its only sports car in the Nurburgring 24 hours Endurance Race. By that I mean that Toyota has decided to let its luxury brand Lexus compete. As such, the actually amazing production version of the Lexus LFA will compete in the above mentioned race, prior to this; Lexus had twice entered the Nurburgring 24 hours with development mules competing in the prototype category. Now the full fledged production version will do the same. The cars will be prepared by Gazoo racing and will be driven by a total of four Japanese and three German drivers that have GT racing and endurance driving experience. The production Lexus LFA has a 552 bhp mid-mounted V10 engine which sounds really unique, and is capable of 0-100 km/h in 3.7 seconds and a top speed of around 320 km/h. I wonder how much modification will go into the car as in endurance racing, reliability is paramount. Maybe the power output will remain the same, with additional oil coolers for the rear differential and gearbox. The other major change might be to the gearing, making it suited for racing and partly fuel economy as its an endurance race. Refueling, tire change as well as driver changing stops play a main role in endurance racing too. Now who are Gazoo Racing you may ask. It seems that Gazoo Racing is a Japanese tuner with a Toyota specific tuning business. They have entered Lexus/Toyota Altezzas in 2007, the Lexus IS250 in 2008 and the prototype LFAs in 2009 in the Nurburgring 24hour races So far their road specials were/are limited to the Toyota IQ and the Vitz in Japan. They are experts in
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