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Found 44 results

  1. Fu11thr0tt1e

    Leave no dark corner

    China is building a digital dictatorship to exert control over its 1.4 billion citizens. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-18/china-social-credit-a-model-citizen-in-a-digital-dictatorship/10200278?fbclid=IwAR1Wwqg3lyP9Z9rJoBN3ZixGAApW5Cek92iu6XviHmcX6hqyQOWsJphecys
  2. any reason wat is the reason for white shirt & dark color pants dress code during certain events or when there are "big visitors" ! i for one hate wearing white !! why must be white & black/dark pants !??
  3. 1l0v3you

    Dark chocolate?

    hello! my cousin bday coming i wanna bake him a nice bittersweet chocolate cake. ^^ any of you heard of dark german chocolate? i love baking but i've never used dark german chocolate. my friend who tried before said that the taste is not like any dark chocolate. it has that distinct extremely dark bittersweet taste and it is like really pure cocoa. he says no other baking chocolate can compare with the german chocolate. i asked around nobody seems to know where to find in singapore. do you all know where? or any suggestions which chocolate you think is equally good? btw, is it ok if i make a marble cheesecake using the german chocolate? or will it taste weird due to it's bitterish taste? i cant really imagine cause i dont know how bitter the chocolate really is. lol. help please?
  4. hi Does this new rule affect Singapore registered Cars with LTA approved window tints ? --------------------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.todayonline.com/world/foreign-vehicles-dark-window-tints-cannot-enter-malaysia KUALA LUMPUR — Foreign vehicles with dark window tints will not be allowed to enter Malaysia. Deputy Transport Minister Abdul Aziz Kaprawi said the Road Transport Department (RTD) will be instructed to carry out the directive as dark window tints were a clear danger. This is in response to concerns that the foreign vehicles entering the country might bring in drug traffickers and Islamic State militant group. “RTD will take immediate action in barring foreign vehicles with dark window tints from entering Malaysia.“Those entering Malaysia will have to remove the dark window tint of their vehicles,” he told the Dewan Negara today in reply to Senator Abdullah Mat Yassin. The issue of car-window tinting, mainly to reduce glare and help control the temperature inside the vehicle - has been divisive for many years. Malaysian motorists who tint their car windows and screen must adhere to Rule 5(1) and Rule 5(3) Motor Vehicles (Prohibition of Certain Glasses) Amendment 2000 - a law that has been widely ignored. The permissible tint levels are a minimum of 70 per cent visible light transmission levels for the front windscreen and 50 per cent for other windows.
  5. Videogames, as everyone knows, are for losers—literally. In defiance of our participation-trophy culture, videogames demand that their players fail, repeatedly. Not many games can make you cry, but scores of them can make you feel frustrated, angry and impotent. The word that we gamers use for this cocktail of sensations is “fun.” Today’s most challenging games are dubbed “masocore,” a combination of “masochist” and “hard-core.” Masocore games are nearly devoid of instructions, kill new players within seconds, and require repeated trial and error to succeed. But it’s not all pointless vexation. These games reinforce a character-building truism: “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” And they also inculcate some practical virtues. All of that losing, it turns out, teaches you how to win, and not just in videogames. Few games illustrate this as starkly as “Dark Souls,” developed by the Japanese studio FromSoftware and published by Bandai Namco. The third entry in the series was released last month. Bandai Namco says that three million copies of “Dark Souls III” have been shipped to retailers world-wide. The series has sold 13 million copies since the release of the first “Dark Souls” in 2011. “Dark Souls III” begins with the player alone in a nearly silent cemetery. There is no music and no dialogue, just a watery path to follow through an almost colorless landscape of browns, grays and blacks. Glowing markers on the ground explain how to attack the skeletons and other undead creatures that lurk ahead. Bloodstains show where players who came before you have died. Like them, you won’t survive. A new book on “Dark Souls” is entitled, aptly, “You Died.” A writer for Wired reported dying 437 times over the 74 hours it took him to complete “Dark Souls III.” I died seven times in the first 45 minutes. The game isn’t merely hard; it’s punishing. If you fail, you can be forced to retrace your steps and again defeat previously vanquished foes. Players who don’t get back to the spot of their demise lose their accumulated progress. Yet the interaction among player, controller and screen is so well tuned that death almost always feels like the player’s fault, not the game’s. To defeat these games, players collaborate online and in person, sharing advice over the Internet much the same way schoolchildren of my generation did on the playground to master “Super Mario Bros.” In “You Died,” a former psychological-operations specialist in the U.S. Army—who has now spent, he says, 1,400 hours playing “Dark Souls”—compares the “persistence and resilience” taught by the game to the virtues that he learned during his military career. “The game demands that you fully commit, have the guts to continue on and the patience to learn from your mistakes,” he says. Another player compares the game to confronting a field of land mines, finding a manual to disarm them, then learning that the manual is in Swahili. “But ‘Dark Souls’ also gives you a Swahili dictionary,” she says, continuing the metaphor. “It expects you to listen and to learn and to improve.” The data bear out these observations. More than a decade ago, John C. Beck and Mitchell Wade, who now work at the consulting firm Accenture, surveyed 2,500 business professionals and concluded that people who played videogames as teenagers were better at business than people who didn’t. Their 2004 book “Got Game: How the Gamer Generation Is Reshaping Business Forever” found that videogame players were more likely to consider themselves experts, to want more pay for better performance and to see persistence as the secret to success. Of course, games can be fun without being edifying. In “The Art of Failure,” the Danish game theorist Jesper Juul compares videogame players who seek out defeat (by playing games that they know they will lose) to moviegoers and readers drawn to works that evoke unpleasant feelings like sadness, fear and disgust. Playing “Dark Souls,” like watching “Old Yeller,” “Psycho” or “Alien,” can be time well wasted even if it brings no practical benefits. Even those who don’t have the dexterity (or time) to master masocore games can draw a lesson from their inadequacy: that, in the real world, sometimes it’s just time to quit. I know enough about the compulsive qualities of some videogames not to let our preschool-age daughters play much of anything. But when they get a little older, I will happily let them play “Dark Souls” or another well-crafted game. They teach patience, doggedness and the rewards that come from hard work.
  6. Hi all, I have a video where the video is very dark and not prominent. Is there any software to further brighten it?
  7. Piyopico

    The Deep Dark Love Affair

    A deep, dark, secret love affair A team of IDF officers, known as the `Mexicans,' helped Singapore establish an army. It was the start of a very special relationship. By Amnon Barzilai Jul.16, 2004 | 12:00 AM Text size THIS STORY IS BY Amnon Barzilai Christmas Eve, 1965, is the unofficial date of the start of the great and continuing love story between Israel and Singapore, a love affair that was kept a deep, dark secret. The international press, like the Israeli media, tried to bring the tale to light. Occasionally, scraps of information leaked out; some were published, some were denied, many were disregarded. The Israelis, as usual, wanted to rush to tell all their friends, but managed to overcome that desire. The fear that the thies would be terminated if they became public knowledge had its effect. Israel imposed a total blackout on the story and the secret was preserved. Until the other side could no longer contain itself. In his book, "From Third World to First: The Singapore Story 1965-2000," published in 2000, Lee Kuan Yew, Singapore's founding father and its first prime minister, disclosed the secret that had been kept for almost 40 years: It was the Israel Defense Forces that established the Singaporean army. The Israeli military mission was headed by Yaakov (Jack) Elazari, then a colonel, who was later promoted to brigadier general. After leaving the army, he became a consultant to the Singaporean army. Hedied 15 years ago. "To disguise their presence, we called them `Mexicans.' They looked swarthy enough," Lee wrote. Singapore's army is today considered the strongest and most advanced of the military forces in Southeast Asia. The alliance between the Israeli and Singaporean defense establishments intensified and expanded, and it now encompasses cooperation between the two countries' military industries, as well. The scope of the deals, according to foreign sources, indicates that the Singaporean army is one of the major clients of Israeli combat means and military technology. Singapore's aircraft industry is cooperating with its Israeli counterpart and with Elbit Systems in upgrading the F-5 warplanes of the Turkish Air Force. A few years ago, Singapore's defense minister revealed that the Gil antitank missile, which is manufactured by Raphael (Israel Armaments Development Authority), was developed in cooperation between the two countries. Surrounded by Muslims Lee explained the need to maintain secrecy to his close friend in the leadership, and the first defense minister in his government, Dr. Goh Keng Swee. "We have to ensure, as far as possible, that the arrival of the Israelis will not become public knowledge, in order not to arouse opposition among the Malay Muslims who live in Malaysia and Singapore," the prime minister summed up. That, in essence, is Singapore's problem. The residents of the small island, which has an area of about 670 square kilometers (Israel is 30 times as large), are mainly Chinese, and they live between the two Muslim countries of Malaysia and Indonesia. Life in the shadow of the large Muslim majority and fear of a Malaysian incursion are an integral part of the history of the two countries. Until 1965, Singapore was part of Malaysia. In that year, the British government decided to withdraw from all its colonies east of the Suez Canal. In a rapid process it was decided to sever Singapore from Malaysia and to establish it as a new and separate country. Singapore declared its independence on August 9, 1965. At the time of its creation, it had only two infantry regiments, which had been established and were commanded by British officers. Two-thirds of the soldiers were not residents of Singapore, and in any event the leaders of the nascent state had no faith in the strength of the minuscule army. The defense minister, Goh, contacted Mordechai Kidron, the former Israeli ambassador to Thailand, and asked for assistance. Kidron arrived in Singapore within days, along with Hezi Carmel of the Mossad. "Goh told us that they think that only Israel, a small country surrounded by Muslim countries, with a strong army, could help them build a small, dynamic army," Carmel says. The two Israelis met with Lee, who writes that he "told Keng Swee to put it on hold until Lal Bahadur Shastri, the prime minister of India, and President Nasser of Egypt replied to my letters seeking their urgent help to build up our armed forces." It's not clear whether Lee, in fact, believed India and Egypt were capable of, or interested in, building up Singapore's army. Many Israelis believe the two leaders were approached only for appearance's sake. After a few weeks of waiting, India and Egypt congratulated Singapore on its independence but did not offer military aid. Lee ordered Goh to push ahead in contacts with the Israelis. At the same time, in the wake of reports sent by Kidron and Carmel, the Israeli defense establishment deployed to supply military aid to Singapore. In discussions conducted by the chief of staff, Yitzhak Rabin, with the participation of the deputy chief of staff and head of the Operations Branch, Ezer Weizmann, it was decided to make Major General Rehavam Ze'evi, who was then deputy head of the Operations Branch, responsible for building the Singaporean army. Ze'evi (nicknamed "Gandhi" ) paid a secret visit to Singapore and the preparatory work began on his return. "Gandhi said he wanted to create an ideal army for Singapore, something we hadn't built here," Carmel says. "Instead of setting up a Defense Ministry and a General Staff, Gandhi suggested an integrated organization, a more economical structure. So there wouldn't be too many generals and too few soldiers." Ze'evi appointed Elazari, who worked under him in the Operations Branch, as head of the team he established. Lieutenant Colonel Yehuda Golan, then-commander of an armored division (he retired from the IDF with the rank of brigadier general), was subsequently added to the team. Some members of the team "concentrated on writing the chapters that dealt with building army bases. I wrote the chapters dealing with the establishment of an infantry," Golan says. Initially they produced the "Brown Book," dealing with combat doctrine, followed by the "Blue Book," dealing with the creation of the Defense Ministry and intelligence bodies. The Brown Book was translated into English and sent to Singapore's government for its perusal. In October 1965, a military delegation from Singapore arrived in Israel. "The delegation arrived in order to tell us: `Well done, but to implement the book, you are invited to come to Singapore,'" Golan recalls. Prior to setting out, the members of the military mission were invited to the chief of staff's bureau. "Dear friends," Rabin said, "I want you to remember several things. One, we are not going to turn Singapore into an Israeli colony. Your task is to teach them the military profession, to put them on their legs so they can run their own army. Your success will be if at a certain stage they will be able to take the wheel and run the army by themselves. Second, you are not going there in order to command them but to advise them. And third, you are not arms merchants. When you recommend items to procure, use the purest professional military judgment. I want total disregard of their decision as to whether to buy here or elsewhere." Wake-up at 5:30 On December 24, 1965, about five months after Singapore became an independent state, six IDF officers and their families set out on an unknown mission. "Elazari and two other officers dealt with the establishment of the Defense Ministry," Golan relates. "My task, along with three other officers, was to establish the army." Elazari operated according to a number of basic principles, from which the original Israeli team and those who followed did not deviate. The first was to build up a cadre of local commanders and instructors. The second was that the instructional material would be written by the cadets who would be trained as officers. And the third was that practical training would be conducted by Singaporean instructors. "We wanted to recruit a group of 40-50 people who had some sort of military experience and would be ready to serve in a career army," Golan explains. "We organized things so that they would appoint one of their number to serve as commander. As head of the group, the cadets chose someone of Indian origin named Kirpa Ram Vij, who would eventually become chief of staff of the Singapore Armed Forces. For three months we gave an intensified officers course." The first course had an IDF format: wake-up at 5:30 A.M., calisthenics, personal arrangements, parade. Training began at 7:30 A.M. and went until 1 A.M. "After a few days of training a group of cadets showed up and said, `Colonel Golan, the Arabs aren't sitting on our heads here. What do we need this madness for?' I called Elazari and explained the situation. He arrived a few days later with Defense Minister Dr. Goh, who told the cadets, `Do what Colonel Golan tells you to do, otherwise you will do double.'" Parallel to conducting the course, the Israeli team supervised the establishment of the first military base, based on plans of the Israeli Engineering Corps. Construction of the base was completed in three months. In under a year, the Israeli team conducted a course for new recruits, a platoon commanders course and an officers course, on the basis of plans that were sent from Israel. All told, about 200 commanders were trained. Jobless instead of soldiers Once the staff of commanders was ready, it was possible to start creating the standing army on the basis of conscription. The Israelis prepared to establish two more infantry regiments, according to the IDF model, with each regiment consisting of three companies of riflemen, an auxiliary company and an administrative company - a total of 600 soldiers. Lieutenant Colonel Moshe Shefi, who was an instructor in a company commanders course, was sent as an adviser. "We discovered that there was psychological resistance to conscription in Singapore," he relates. "Of 10 professions, that of soldier was ranked last. In first place was the artist, followed by the philosopher, the teacher and the merchant, and the thief was in ninth place. Soldiering was considered a contemptible profession. In Singapore, conscription was considered a means to overcome unemployment." The Israelis faced a problem. To evade service, most of the young men of draft age (18-24) who were of Chinese origin furnished proof that they were employed. Some 70 percent of the inductees were unemployed and of Malaysian origin - the opposite of their proportion within the population. Elazari and Golan complained to Lee and Goh, but the prime minister was undeterred. "I want you to recruit the most primitive people in the country, the uneducated and the jobless," he told them. Stunned, the Israelis tried to persuade him to reconsider, but he was adamant: "In the Second World War, I saw the Japanese and the British. All the British soldiers were intelligent and educated. But as soldiers they were worthless. The most primitive Japanese soldier gets an order and executes it, and they were extraordinary soldiers. The fact is that the Japanese army defeated the British army." Golan says, "Yaakov and I tried to explain to him that it's not a question of education but of motivation. The Japanese soldier was motivated because he was fighting for his emperor, who for him was God. For him, he was ready to sacrifice his life. What motivation did the British soldier have, who fought thousands of kilometers from his home?" The explanations about the spirit of combat and about how to generate motivation persuaded Lee. Along with the two tracks of compulsory service and career army, Singapore also adopted the IDF's model of reserve service. Every soldier who completed his regular service was obligated to serve another 13 years, until the age of 33. A system to mobilize the reserves was established and the Defense Ministry carried out surprise call-up exercises. Because of its small size and its lack of areas for live-fire training, Singapore had to establish training bases in friendly neighboring countries. Surprise tanks The unquiet in Singapore, and above all the fear of an invasion by Malay forces, together with the rapid development of the Singaporean army, generated additional needs. With the creation of the infantry, the Israeli team made an in-depth study of the battles fought by the Japanese in Southeast Asia during World War II and of how they succeeded in invading Malaysia and Singapore. Shefi was given the task of delivering a talk on the subject to Singapore's government. On the basis of the lessons the Israelis drew from the engagements fought by Japan and Britain, they created a naval force based on sampans. "The boats were made of wood and could carry 10 to 15 soldiers, and they were appropriate for the conditions of the sea and for the jungle rivers," Golan says. "On a stormy sea they can be operated with oars or a motor. We asked the Singaporeans to purchase 20 boats and we set up a small base where infantry companies trained in raids and navigation." Retired Colonel Asher Dar says, "The second team that arrived in Singapore applied what Yehuda Golan did in the form of combat doctrine. We trained in flanking maneuvers with small boats and in live fire using artillery. When the head of the training department, Yitzhak Hofi, visited Singapore, we carried out a model landing of an infantry brigade that set sail in boats at night at a distance of 12 kilometers with the aid of shore navigation only." The waiting period in Israel on the eve of the 1967 Six-Day War was a rough time for the Israeli team in Singapore. "We were relieved the Israelis were not defeated or our SAF [singapore Armed Forces] would have lost confidence" in the Israeli instructors, Lee writes. In January 1968, Singapore decided to create an armored corps. In great secrecy, an agreement was signed for the purchase of 72 AMX-13 light tanks from IDF surplus. It was a bold decision: Malaysia, the country's large neighbor, didn't have tanks. On Independence Day, August 9, 1969, a major surprise awaited the invited guests, including the defense minister of Malaysia: 30 tanks rolled past the reviewing stand. "It had a dramatic effect," Lee writes. Malaysia had cause for concern. Its defense minister recommended to his guests that they take steps to persuade the Malaysian government that its intentions were not hostile. In the wake of the Israeli victory in 1967, the veil of secrecy over the ties between the two countries was lifted a bit. The Singapore delegate at the United Nations abstained in a vote on a resolution condemning Israel that was sponsored by the Arab states. Contacts began to establish full diplomatic relations. In October 1968, Lee permitted Israel to establish a trade mission and in May 1969 authorization was given for the establishment of an Israeli embassy in Singapore. The status of the Israeli military mission to Singapore was also strengthened, and the mission heads who followed held brigadier general rank. The first Israeli military delegation laid the foundations for an extensive network of relations between Israel and Singapore. Foundations of the air force The small Israeli team in Singapore was augmented by professional military advisers for the various corps. The chief armored corps officer, Major General Avraham Adan, arrived to give advice on procuring armored vehicles. In 1968, Adam Tzivoni, a retired colonel who had been head of the planning and weapons branch in the air force, was appointed adviser to the Singapore Armed Forces in regard to the creation of an air force. "As compensation for the hasty departure of the British army, the British government gave Singapore a grant of 50 million pounds to acquire British-made aerial systems: planes, helicopters and surface-to-air missiles," Tzivoni relates. "The British didn't like me at all. My first task was to approve the deals. It turned out that the English tried to sell Singapore junk. Apart from a deal for Hunters, I vetoed all the deals." Under Tzivoni's supervision, a flight school was established in Singapore, as well as a technical school, a squadron of Alouette 3 helicopters was purchased and 40 mm anti-aircraft guns were acquired. Uzis and Israeli marching songs After the creation of the Singaporean army's infantry regiments, the question arose of what weapons the nascent armed forces would use. The commanding officers wanted the Uzi, the Israeli submachine gun. The Israeli team took an objective view and rejected the idea. True, the Uzi was considered a superb weapon in the 1960s, but only for short ranges. A regular army needs an assault rifle, the Israeli team asserted. Representatives of Israel Military Industries exerted pressure on the Defense Ministry to sell the new Galil assault rifle. However, the team decided that the rifle wasn't yet full ready and recommended the American M-16. Another major headache for the Israelis concerned the decision about which mortars to procure for the new army. Infantry regiments are equipped with 60 - 52 mm and 18 mm mortars. The weapons, which were developed and manufactured by the Soltam company, based in the town of Yokne'am, were sold to the Israel Defense Forces and exported worldwide. "Even though we thought these were the best mortars, we decided not to recommend them but to make use of an independent source in order to reach a decision," says Yehuda Golan, a member of the team sent to Singapore. The Israeli team asked a British firm that dealt in organization and consultation on military subjects to examine a series of mortars and recommend the best one. The report stated that the best of the lot was an 18 mm mortar manufactured in Britain. However, considering the price, the recommendation was to buy the Soltam product. The Singapore Armed Forces acquired the Israeli mortar. "The Israelis emphasized military skills and high motivation. Smartness on parade and military tattoo, the SAF [singapore Armed Forces] never learned from the `Mexicans.' Whatever smartness the SAF had" derived from the British officers who commanded the army's first two regiments, Lee writes. "Our motto was that we would not stick our nose into what the Singaporeans could do themselves," Golan notes. "They wanted us to organize the Independence Day parade for them. We argued that a state military parade reflects the country's mentality and its history." The Singaporeans didn't make an issue of it. However, they had a problem that demanded an immediate solution - which marches to play as the soldiers marched in unison. The head of the Israeli mission, Yaakov Elazari, brought notes from Israel and the Singapore army strode to Israeli marching songs. The jungle combat manual The Singaporeans took the Israelis by surprise when they insisted on getting a course on jungle combat. Singapore has a tiny natural jungle of no more than five or six square kilometers, but the neighboring states have larger jungles. Yehuda Golan: "I told them they were right but that I wasn't the right guy, because I knew nothing about jungles." Nevertheless, the Israeli team began to find out how to cope with the subject. It was decided to send two Singapore officers as guests of the Malaysian army for a course on jungle combat. "Three months later, the two officers returned with the knowledge they acquired in Malaysia, and we decided to conduct a course in jungle combat," Golan continues. "Out of curiosity, I decided to join. It looked very bad - it was clear that they had taught them British methods from the Second World War period. I decided to take a group of 10 officers. We entered the jungle and started to engage in war games. We trained in navigation, deploying forces, search and assault. We went through the American training manuals on combat in Vietnam. We developed methods of night navigation. We learned how to function with a fighting company in the dense undergrowth. After a few weeks of training, I wrote the training manual of the Singapore Armed Forces for jungle combat."
  8. Anyone looking forward to this?
  9. official teaser, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lPz9qFZ8EI&watch_response teaser with joker, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9UZ587vjYA laughter sounds twisted.
  10. Vulcann

    Zero Dark Thirty

    Any bros eagerly awaiting this? Source: http://www.deadline.com/interstitial/?ref=...oscar-voters%2F Before launch, there was already controversy on the depicted torture scenes disputed by US officials. BTW ZDT was directed by Kathryn Bigelow, famed for coming out with The Hurt Locker. For those unitiated, ZDT was based on a true story and claimed to be the greatest manhunt in history. Lets wait and see.
  11. Ahtong

    The Dark Knight Rises - Trailer

    Coming in July. Although Marvel have done a better job with their movies, my favourite superhero movie in recent times is still the grouchy (and now past his prime) Batman
  12. Gabriel

    The dark knight rises game...

    doesnt run on my galaxy note..any one has any idea y ?
  13. Hello bros, i intend to change the colour of my dark blue avante to pure white in the future. will the original dark colour affect the white colour i paint on it? what are the possible side effects of changing the colour of your car? will the colour fade in the future? will FC drop?
  14. Trinitronics

    Dark tint

    Hi I would like to know if my whole car is tinted dark will I get stop at Singapore Custom for not following the LTA rules? Thanks & Regards, Desmond
  15. Ahtong

    The Dark Knight Rises

    Coming in 2012. I think Chris Nolan's Batman movies are the best superhero movies in recent times
  16. Sash1401

    Transformer 3 Dark of the moon

    Having watching the last n final sequence on Wed nite, i guess tats the end of the movie.... More actions than the previous 2 but the female lead is much more less attractive than the original Megan Fox.... Good ending for the movie with Megatron, Starscream and Sentinent Prime killed.... but do u guys think there will be part 4? Any views on the movie??
  17. Mustank

    Sky looks dark, Going to Flood?

    If anywhere near CBD, bukit merah, tiong bahru, queenstown area going to flood, please let me know. I take mustank out to play
  18. you probably stay in the private apartment, condo or landed in West Coast. This happened at about 8pm this evening on a wet road, after I had made a right and then left turn into the smaller Pasir Panjang Road, about to go past the 2 buses which had stopped in the bus bay. Your daughter was happily skipping out in front of the first bus when I was barely two metre away from the front of the bus. I took about 3m to totally stop the car at about 40km/h, 1.5m of my reaction time and 1.5m of skidding distance. I do not have ABS, BBK and super grippy tires on my old ride. I am not driving an F1 car that can come to a stop in 2m from about 70km/h. Nor can I foresee a kid in a supposedly good school (well at least we always touted our educational system is world class) can be so stupid and reckless, and inconsiderate. The fortunate thing is that she stopped and retraced back her steps in time cos I only managed to stop about 1.5m after the bus. Kudos to her agility. At that kind of speed and probable impact, most likely she will survive, maybe live with some scars or disability. Good thing also that the lorry behind did not rear-end me as lorries generally accelerate slower. Please, apart from academic excellence, please teach your kid the other part of surviving in the city. The world is not her playground, the road is not her playground. In the event something happened, I have a lot of witnesses on my side. When I skidded to a stop, a lot of them were looking in the direction of your daughter (yes that kind of jury look), who happily just walked away and continued crossing the road as if nothing happened. Please, next time she might be not be so lucky. Dun wait for next time, teach your daughter how to look out for herself and cross the road safely. I took some time to cool down before I pen this else I can guarantee you the length of expletives that will make the Titanic look more like a short commercial. I already had a rough day on the road, in the jam, giving way to people and end up others do not give way to me. I should stop being a nice guy so often. Best part is, who caused the huge jam from Tiong Bahru to Outram Road? One police scooter parked on the slow lane of the road for no apparent reason...to the officer...F*** U!!! God bless all and to your daughter especially. * expletive count: 02 *
  19. you probably stay in the private apartment, condo or landed in West Coast. This happened at about 8pm this evening on a wet road, after I had made a right and then left turn into the smaller Pasir Panjang Road, about to go past the 2 buses which had stopped in the bus bay. Your daughter was happily skipping out in front of the first bus when I was barely two metre away from the front of the bus. I took about 3m to totally stop the car at about 40km/h, 1.5m of my reaction time and 1.5m of skidding distance. I do not have ABS, BBK and super grippy tires on my old ride. I am not driving an F1 car that can come to a stop in 2m from about 70km/h. Nor can I foresee a kid in a supposedly good school (well at least we always touted our educational system is world class) can be so stupid and reckless, and inconsiderate. The fortunate thing is that she stopped and retraced back her steps in time cos I only managed to stop about 1.5m after the bus. Kudos to her agility. At that kind of speed and probable impact, most likely she will survive, maybe live with some scars or disability. Good thing also that the lorry behind did not rear-end me as lorries generally accelerate slower. Please, apart from academic excellence, please teach your kid the other part of surviving in the city. The world is not her playground, the road is not her playground. In the event something happened, I have a lot of witnesses on my side. When I skidded to a stop, a lot of them were looking in the direction of your daughter (yes that kind of jury look), who happily just walked away and continued crossing the road as if nothing happened. Please, next time she might be not be so lucky. Dun wait for next time, teach your daughter how to look out for herself and cross the road safely. I took some time to cool down before I pen this else I can guarantee you the length of expletives that will make the Titanic look more like a short commercial. I already had a rough day on the road, in the jam, giving way to people and end up others do not give way to me. I should stop being a nice guy so often. Best part is, who caused the huge jam from Tiong Bahru to Outram Road? One police scooter parked on the slow lane of the road for no apparent reason...to the officer...F*** U!!! God bless all and to your daughter especially. * expletive count: 02 *
  20. don't you think it'd make our cars more efficient while saving the environment?
  21. My PC is now semi crashing running on XP. A new copy of Win7 is 159. I don't want to shell out this amount for an OS that is going to get bloated. Worse, will slowly degrade thanks to the registry and the .DLLs. Then I looked at the Linux distros. They look good. I don't need to game anymore. The PC is now used for surfing, email, viewing Youtube videos, minor content creation with photos some videos and of cours the usual wordprocessor and spreadsheets. D/L'd Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala and ran it off the CD. Impressive. So I decided to look for something for an easier transition. Linux Mint 8 Helena is more like it. Still Windozey for the wife to transition to. Anybody taken the leap. I'm sick and tired of paying to M$ for failure and lousy security.
  22. As topic, those with JDM cars will know the rear glasses are already darkened (privacy glass) and already barely pass the light test on it's own, so add on a layer of solar film, even if it is the clearest film, mean potentially won't pass inspection. Anyone have gone through the inspection and which inspection center more easy to pass the solar film on JDM glass, and which center fail the solar film on JDM glass? Pls share here. Thanks.
  23. Darryn

    Dark Bronze (?) Civic SJF

    To the driver of dark bronz civic on TPE towards PIE at about 12:45 Friday, I have a few questions.. 1) Does your grandfather own the road? 2) Did you hatch when a syphilitic, alcoholic imbecile pissed on a toadstool? 3) Do you work for the traffic police? NO? Then when somebody else is in a hurry keep the fark out of the way - lane one is the passing lane for a reason you pus infected used condom My only disappointment is that I had to turn off at avenue 10 and couldn't "play" with you some more
  24. Mustank

    The Dark Angel

    http://www.asiaone.com/News/Latest%2BNews/...011-172971.html
  25. What type/brand of car is this? It's a 2-door.. Im very curious...
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