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  1. Came accross this article in Yahoo ........... Yahoo news: Dear CPF: Give Me Back My Money! Dear CPF, For years you’ve taken a cut from my paycheck under the promise of social “protection.” In a way, you’re like a very well-intentioned gangster, protecting my money from well… me right? I’m grateful though that you at least “allow” me to use some of my money towards buying a home, or to subsidise (partially) my hospital bills. I’m not going to ask what you do with my money while it’s in your hands (I’m sure it’s just sitting there untouched right?). But I do ask that you let me use it for pressing emergencies that directly affect me and my family’s well-being. What do I mean? Let me enlighten you. 1. For Retrenchment My financial obligations won’t stop if I get retrenched. Finding a job takes 2-3 months at best. I’m lucky I have enough savings to last me 3 months, but what if it takes longer? What if I had no savings to begin with? Any unsecured debt I have (credit cards, car loan, personal loans, etc.) still needs to be paid – otherwise I risk damaging my credit with late payments or even default. The banks don’t care that I lost my job. They’re about as sympathetic as a cat watching a rodent struggle in a mousetrap. But if I could use my “account” to service my unsecured debt if I get retrenched, even if it’s just to make my minimum payments, that would give me the financial flexibility to weather the situation. Plus, it would discourage those without savings from worsening their financial situation by going to Ah Longs for money. 2. For Education Ultimately, the government wants me to be successful. The more successful I am, the more taxes I can contribute to our nation’s economy. So why can’t I use some of the money from my account towards education, whether I want to pursue an MDA-approved training course or a degree? You don’t need me to tell you that education improves my earning potential, which is a win-win for everyone. I improve my standard of living while the government takes a greater amount of tax revenue. Plus, if I’m working in a sunset industry that has a bleak outlook, I can get the training I need to transition to a more promising profession. But not everyone has the money on hand to pay for education… oh yeah, they do – you’re holding it CPF! So ease up a little on the funds distribution and let us chant Jerry Maguire’s “help me, help you” line together yeah? 3. For Growing Transportation Costs Paying for transportation in Singapore is like choosing how you want to be tortured. The choices differ, but the result is the same – you’re still paying hundreds or thousands of dollars a month just to commute daily! It doesn’t matter whether you own a car or use public transportation, the cost to travel to and from work, pick up the wife and kids, or take the family out to Sentosa is always increasing. All you have to do is see how much COE, ERP, taxi, and public transportation rates have increased over the last few years. Of course, I don’t own 3 cars, nor do I live in Sentosa Cove – and neither do a majority of citizens who suffer every time transportation costs rise. But it would help if I could use some of my funds as a monthly “transportation allowance” to offset the financial pain felt by price hikes. In Conclusion… Now, before you crumple up this letter (if you haven’t already), I have one more thing to say… Tax payers won’t need to support me with these situations. That’s because this money is already mine to begin with (or so you tell me). All I’m asking is that you make it easier for me to access my funds so I can patch up my social safety net. If you need to validate my situation before dispersing my funds to prevent “fraud,” I’m fine with that. I’d rather deal with the inconvenience of a sloth-like bureaucracy than have to worry about how I’m going to come up with cash in an emergency. Again, I’m grateful for the monthly shakedown that’s necessary for my retirement. But you’ve got to be a little more flexible when it comes to financial emergencies that cannot wait. Yours sincerely, A Messenger of Singaporean Frustrations P.S. Umm…. yeah, if you could let me use my funds to cover the hospital bill for childbirth (c’mon, we’re doing you a favor by creating more taxpayers) and for elderly friendly renovations to take care of my ageing grandparents without sending them to a home, that would be great. link: http://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/dear-cpf-back-money-160000444.html Look like the person who wrote this has not reach the retirement age or 55yrs to withdraw his CPF. Thats why very important to save for raining days....
  2. i am looking to restart my ICE DIY again... since the old ice forums sgsoundsystem die out, anyone knows if there are still any general active ICE forums in SG? or is mycarforum the only general one left? now everyone separated, so lets see if we can re-start. i know Bobcat recently appointed Emma Judge. there is still ICE competitions, but very very low key already. lets see, i got Pioneer P99RS ready for 3 way active. 3 way component speakers ??? No Dyn esotar ok, something basic to start with. maybe Rainbow 3 way my fav. 6 chn power amp ??? hmm looking at JL audio XDv2 or good ole Audison LRx6.9
  3. Orangepineapple

    Persistent Lower Back Pain

    Want to seek some advice from bros here who also suffer from lower back pain I am having lower back pain for few months already. Initially only pain when I do some awkward motions like twisting and bending down. But now it has worsen to constant pain/ache no matter standing or sitting, to the extend that when walking I cannot really straighten the back. Of course i had been to the doctor's several times, every time he will take an x-ray and tell me that there is no problem with the spine and bones. and there's nothing he can do except prescribing some physiotheraphy. I went for physio for a while but it did not help. So i went back and the doctor said the x-ray did not show anything and he really dunno how, so he suggested to do an MRI scan to check if the nerves are ok. My question is: are MRI scan really useful? I am worried that after i go through this expensive scan the doctor is going to say that the scan shows nothing and direct me to physio again. then i would have wasted money to go back to square one any bros can advice? or any bros know of any good places that can treat back pain?
  4. Discoburg

    Curry sauce is back

    Gonna grab half a dozen of bottles this time. mcdonalds-singapore-curry-sauce-bottle-back-11571832
  5. http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/starhub-m1-announce-new-plans-for-data-hungry-consumers-9169150 Not that i use so much, but seems like they fighting off Circles.life.
  6. Extract from Sunday Times, 13 June. Fans of Texas Fried Chicken, which was here in the late 1980's, can rejoice. The chain relaunched with an outlet at the Singapore Expo on Wednesday, 9 June. Take a bite of the Original or Spicy Fried Chicken ($7.40 for a two piece combo) or the Mexicana Burger - a sandwich of chicken fillet, cheese onion and nachos ($7.40 for a combo). http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/sin...1036612/1/.html Can't wait to go this week to try! I also wan my A&W back here!!!
  7. Discoburg

    Where are you?

    I'm back buddy. Where are you @Dach?
  8. Hi! I've replaced my factory headunit with an aftermarket one, including new 360 degree cameras. The factory headunit reverse camera had built-in dynamic parking lines (ie. moves with the steering wheel). The after-market one does not. The installer said it's like that but didn't really explain why. My question is whether the dynamic lines are built into the camera, or if there is an additional processor somewhere in the connection between camera and head-unit. I've tried to look it up online but haven't found clear information. Most say there's a gyroscope inside the camera which provides the data for the lines to move. Does this mean if I simply replace the camera with one with a built-in gyroscope I'll have dynamic lines (instead of static lines currently?) Thanks!
  9. Neutrino

    Feedback

    Every day at some time I cannot make the connection to MCF although all my other sites work well. Unable to connect may last for an hour or so. Why is this. Does MCF carry out daily upgrades or something??
  10. Rebirth, or Looming Fizzle? The Station Wagon Had a Pretty Good Year in 2018 In the absolutely superb 1949 war film Twelve O’Clock High, a doctor stationed at a U.S. Army Air Force base in WW2 England uses an interesting comparison when describing a character’s mental breakdown. “Have you ever seen a light bulb burn out? How bright the filament gets right before it breaks?” A similar phenomenon could be at work in a certain vehicle niche, one which gets more press than actual sales warrant. The lowly, reviled, and suddenly revered station wagon, now referred to in terms meant to dispel the stodgy family hauler image of decades past. Never mind that BMW just announced its 3 Series wagon won’t make a return trip from Europe. There’s wagons aplenty these days, and it’s this writer’s firm belief that you’ll never have a better change to bring home a competent non-light truck cargo hauler. It’s now or never. While wagon variants allow automakers to rack up additional sales of a given nameplate, the wagon community remains a small one. Loyal and passionate, but small. And what room there is for growth depends on your level of optimism. As Bloomberg notes, 2018 was a great year for wagon sales, simply because consumers suddenly found themselves with choice. Buick has the new Regal TourX, Jaguar has the new XF Sportbrake, Volvo has the tony V90 and V60, Mercedes-Benz has the dignified E 450 4Matic wagon and disgruntled AMG E63 S wagon, Audi has the A4 Allroad, and Volkswagen will still gladly sell you a modest Golf SportWagen. All of this choice resulted in a bigger niche than years past. Some 212,000 wagons left U.S. dealer lots in 2018, representing a 29 percent sales increase compared to five years earlier. Still, wagons amounted to less than 2 percent of the new vehicle market last year. That’s plug-in car territory. This group of buyers, described by Buick marketing director Sam Russell as “almost violently opposed to being mainstream,” doesn’t want to be seen driving an anonymous crossover. And let’s face it, it’s easier to sculpt a sexy wagon than a high-riding, bulbous crossover. Thing is, though, wagons sales are a slim wedge of the overall volume of a particular nameplate. As sedan sales falter, wagons, despite their snob appeal, won’t pick up enough of the slack. All a wagon can do is delay a model’s discontinuation, if we’re to assume today’s market shift continues uninterrupted. If sedans disappear from our streets, so too will wagons, despite wagons being a happy middle ground between sedans and crossovers. A sad situation, if the worst-case scenario comes to pass. While Bloomberg reports Buick’s TourX sales “increased steadily” over the past 12 months, Volvo’s gorgeous V90 is now available by custom order only, and Jaguar’s XF Sportbrake, while sultry, has to contend with the fact that no one’s interested in buying Jaguar cars these days. Even the brand’s crossovers can’t keep sales in the black. Despite the recent uptick in wagon interest and availability, it’s hard not to see this phenomenon as a tired light bulb valiantly burning its way towards destruction.
  11. I tot they zao liao? How come last afternoon I see got one driving along clementi to commonwealth there? definitely diff from the one below
  12. Quite a healthy lifestyle, never over or under weight all my life. Don't drink or smoke and does half marathon runs weekly. Recently I had a bad issue of upper right back pain (close to spine C7 or T1) and right chest pain (close to Sternum, slightly higher than nipple). Sometimes the pain can extend all the way to the back of my upper right arm and behind the armpit. Saw 2 doctors, took Xrays of right chest and all just gave me anti inflammatory medicine and muscle rub. Breathing is painful, deep breaths are even worse. Many times the pain feels worse after waking up from sleep (why is that so?) Doctors told me it should be cartilage of the ribs and back muscles that are inflamed and overworked. Took the medicine for 2 months and the medication doesn't seem to work. Occasionally it seems to bring down the pain but it will come right back soon after (even without me exercising). Have anybody here deal with this type of pain and how did you manage to overcome the problem? Thanks in advance.
  13. Spotted a Mini Cooper in Punggol with no car plate behind. Camo pattern paint with super dark windows. Anyone seen before?
  14. in the previous episode, house of Tan did a quick flip from 60 to 90 mil. Now I wonder how much higher it can go. But filpping and earning the profit, is it still taxable ? or once you pay the stamp duties already done deal liao ? Since you cannot happy happy redevelop , how to get more from this kind of property ? THE House of Tan Yeok Nee, a gazetted national monument alongPenang Road, is back on the market, a year after it was last transacted. Its owner, a special purpose vehicle of ERC Holdings, is believed to be looking at a price of over $100 million. It purchased the freehold property at slightly over $60 million last year. When contacted, ERC chairman Andy Ong said he was selling the asset as it has "reached its investment objective". "We usually make property investments with a five to seven-year investment horizon. But in this case, we have reached the expected price sooner than expected because of macro-economic factors such as liquidity, and strong investment demand for Singapore commercial property. On top of that, this is a one-of-its-kind property: It is the last remaining traditional Chinese courtyard house in Singapore." The House of Tan Yeok Nee is named after a wealthy Teochew businessman who built it in the 1880s. It was restored in 2000. The property sits on land of about 32,000 sq ft and has a strata area of about 58,000 sq ft. Its net lettable area is about 23,000 sq ft, but Jones Lang LaSalle, which is marketing the property, said there is potential to increase this to around 36,000 sq ft through reconfiguration of void areas and use of courtyard space. Currently the property is fully leased to the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. The lease runs out in 2015. "Subject to approval from relevant authorities, there is potential for alternative uses including a flagship office building, specialist retail, hospitality or F&B usage," JLL said in its release yesterday. Anthony Barr, JLL's national director (investments), said: "This is a rare opportunity to acquire an asset for commercial use in a prime location in the Orchard Road precinct. House of Tan Yeok Nee is a unique asset that offers owner occupiers or investors the ability to leverage off the building's prominence and historical significance." The tender for The House of Tan Yeok Nee will close on July 5. ERC boss Andy Ong has been in the news over a dispute with Sakae Holdings, where he was formerly non-executive director. Earlier this month, Sakae dropped two legal actions against Mr Ong after it secured rights to jointly control a special bank account holding tens of millions of dollars in proceeds from the sale of Bugis Cube, among other things. But Sakae said it will continue to pursue a defamation lawsuit against Mr Ong's public relations firm, Financial PR Pte Ltd, and another action against him for breach of his duties. ERC Holdings through a special purpose vehicle also owns Big Hotel along Middle Road. The hotel began trading earlier this month and last Saturday, all 200 rooms which had been opened by then were fully taken, said Mr Ong. The 16-storey hotel has 308 rooms with sizes ranging from 11 to 50 sq metres. The average room size is 15 sq metres. "We're rushing to open the rest of the rooms by the end of next week," said Mr Ong. The hotel is currently offering a promotional room rate starting from $128 per night. Graduates of ERC's diploma and degree courses in hospitality management are among the hotel's employees. ERC Holdings is an education, property and hotel group. Mr Ong, its chairman, owns more than 70 per cent of ERC. When asked if he was willing to sell Big Hotel, Mr Ong replied: "We have received a lot of enquiries. Let's see what happens." In terms of his pricing expectation, Mr Ong said this will be at least at the valuation. The freehold hotel was valued recently at $240 million, which works out to nearly $800,000 per room. ERC converted Big Hotel from the former Prime Centre, which it bought in late 2010 from Hong Leong Group. It paid $103 million for the building and pumped in another $30 million retrofitting the 16-storey building.
  15. https://mothership.sg/2018/10/tharman-tommy-koh-social-mobility-inequality-ips-30th-anniversary-transcript/ out-of-context screengrab from DPM Tharman
  16. Hi All, Any Civic drivers facing the same issue with water droplets in the head / back lights after rain or wash? Is it normal? My paint protection guys told me this is a defect for a new car, suspected sealant has not been done properly. But the Honda agent say it is normal
  17. 2019 Chevrolet Blazer: The “Blazer” Is Back!https://www.caranddriver.com/news/2019-chevrolet-blazer-the-blazer-is-back-official-photos-and-info For those of us who have achieved a certain age (if not the maturity that generally comes with it), we know what a Chevrolet Blazer is. It’s the K5: a cut-down full-size pickup with a flimsy removable fiberglass shell covering the bed and cab. It’s kind of ratty because it’s owned by a teenager, it’s been jacked up a mile in the air, and it wears off-road tires that roar louder than a hurricane when they travel over pavement. It’s the truck that always led the conga line to the lake every summer because it was mostly filled with cheap beer and ice. It’s all Alan Jackson songs, T-shirts without sleeves, cutoff Lee jeans, a cooler held together with duct tape, and inner-tubing on the Chattahoochee. A Blazer has live axles front and rear, four-wheel drive, a full frame, and a small-block V-8 with a lumpy idle; and when it rains, that’s when nature itself hoses out the interior. Then there’s this. A 2019 crossover with a unibody structure and transverse mounted engine that Chevy calls “Blazer.” We knew the Blazer. We loved the Blazer. And this, GM, is no Blazer. Get me some Doritos and a six-pack. Coors? Budweiser? Hamm’s? Who cares? I’m going to go float on the raft for a couple of hours and try to get past this. Just Exactly What Isn’t Needed Chevy already has five crossovers and SUVs in its lineup, ranging from the wee little Trax up through the Equinox, Traverse, and Tahoe to the stupefyingly large Suburban. General Motors will rightly brag about how the Tahoe and ’Burban dominate their markets, the Equinox and Traverse are gaining market share, and that the Trax does something or other. The new two-row “Blazer” slots into the narrow space between the Equinox and Traverse, one never before recognized by Chevy. Call it the mid-mid-size, mid-midrange crossover segment. Or call it Chevy’s version of the GMC Acadia. Your choice. What’s obvious is that Chevrolet didn’t need the “Blazer” as much as it needed a chance to pick up some sales in a segment occupied by the Ford Edge and the Nissan Murano. In the current market, practically no one wants to buy a Malibu. The new Blazer is a perfectly rational reaction to what buyers want. And that sucks. Now That That’s out of the Way . . .Okay, the Blazer is what it is: a mainstream crossover. Here’s what to know about it. It is good-looking, with the nose capped by a grille that seems as if it migrated over from the Camaro ZL1, the wheels pushed out to the corners so there are barely any overhangs, and every body panel featuring some interesting sculptural element. Of the now six Chevrolet crossovers and SUVs, this one is the most daring, if such a word can even be uttered in reference to an SUV. Of all the other crossovers out there, perhaps the one the new “Blazer” resembles most is the Lamborghini Urus. You decide which of the two is flattered by that comparison. The basic structural bits are in fact shared with the GMC Acadia and the Cadillac XT5. The new Chevy will be built at GM’s plant in Ramos Arizpe, Mexico (which doesn’t please the UAW). It’s a five-passenger hauler with both rows offering decent room and well-shaped seats. And in the sports-like RS trim, the interior features bursts of color in the upholstery and along the dashboard that manage the neat trick of being both startling and kind of elegant. The less flashy Premier trim is subdued enough that it may as well be an Equinox. The standard powerplant is the familiar 193-hp 2.5-liter inline-four. More attractive is the equally familiar 305-hp 3.6-liter V-6. Both engines are direct injected, and both feed a nine-speed automatic transmission that can in turn feed an all-wheel-drive system. Fuel-economy estimates haven’t yet been revealed, but they should be a bit better than the Acadia’s since the GMC currently uses a six-speed automatic. Lower-spec Blazers will come standard on 18-inch wheels. Flash a few more bucks and those wheels grow up to 21 inches in diameter, which will impress many, many neighbors. With all the LED lighting and the aggressive-ish styling, finding the right balance between visual dignity and blinding ostentation will be an options-sheet challenge for Blazer buyers. Chevrolet hasn’t announced pricing yet, since the Blazer won’t hit showrooms until early 2019. Expect it to be fully competitive with similar machines, though, because GM actually wants to sell these things. Technodazzle Monster mudder tires and metal dashboards were virtues back in the full-size Blazer’s run, from 1969 to 1994, but now the world wants smartphone integration, backup cameras, and sensors that throw off enough radar waves to irradiate the nation’s almond crop. The new Blazer has six USB ports, a glovebox that snaps open electronically, and all sorts of lane-keeping equipment available. The electronic trick list stretches to include a wireless charging pad, a hands-free liftgate, and a trailer-hookup guidance system, among a few other things, but none of this is surprising in this current environment. Tech is expected. And tech is what the 2019 Blazer offers. Woulda, Coulda, ShouldaJeep can’t keep Wranglers in stock, the Toyota 4Runner has experienced an amazing sales renaissance, and Ford is about to bring back the Bronco. The Blazer name should be on a truly capable off-roader like those beloved machines. Why is Chevy letting this opportunity slide by? Chevrolet has heretofore done a pretty good job of keeping a philosophical handle on its heritage nameplates. Corvettes are still all two-seaters with fiberglass bodies. The Camaro is, as always, a rip-snorting muscle pony even when it’s powered by a V-6. The Blazer ought to be, once again, Chevy’s true off-roader, something that looks awesome covered in mud. Frustratingly, there’s even a product in Chevrolet’s extended family that would make a true Blazer. That’s the Brazil-market TrailBlazer, which shares much of its engineering DNA with the Colorado pickup truck. Bring that thing up, call it the Blazer, and call this one the Vue or the Lumina APV or something. Ironically, 2019 is the 50th anniversary of the first Blazer. It’s a name that inspires affection in those of us who admired the original—and even the smaller S-10 versions. And there’s a real passion among us oldsters who drove them both when they were new and when they were decades-old beaters. There are rivers and lakes and big open spaces that call for a real Chevy Blazer to go find them. This “Blazer,” no matter how good a crossover it might be, isn’t that Blazer. Let’s go get sno-cones.
  18. https://jalopnik.com/the-alfa-romeo-gtv-is-back-with-more-than-600-horsepowe-1826477782 Alfa Romeo’s GTV is a storied nameplate if there ever was one. The GTV, which stands for “Gran Turismo Veloce,” or Fast Grand Touring, has been an Alfa Spider, an Alfa Giulia, an Alfa Alfetta, and a Spider again. And now it’s back with a lot of power. If you can’t read the powerpoint slide helpfully provided to everyone from Alfa’s parent company, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, it’s set to have a 50/50 weight distribution; more than 600 horsepower from “E-Boost,” or what’s more than likely a hybrid setup, all-wheel-drive, and “four-passenger seating.” Or, in other words, it’s going to be a coupe. In case you couldn’t tell already from the faint single line on the side of the car, implying one (1) door per side. You know. Like a coupe. With two doors. That’s what coupes are. In fact, it looks remarkably like an Alfa Giulia coupe, and if we’re doing our math properly, it all sort of implies there’s going to be an Alfa GT as well, in addition to the GTV. Alfa’s got all the engines for a more down-market GT coupe to complement the GTV, complete with a range of four- and six-cylinder engines, after all. And we’ve got no problems with an Alfa Giulia coupe, seeing as how the Giulia is one of the best cars on sale today, when it works. Already we’re seeing this thing aimed at the BMW 8 Series and Polestar One. Not that we’re complaining. More on FCA’s plan as we get it. Alfa Romeo brings back 8C and GTV, and adds two more SUVshttps://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/industry/alfa-romeo-brings-back-8c-and-gtv-and-adds-two-more-suvs Alfa Romeo will reintroduce two iconic models, the 8C and GTV, by 2022 as part of a bold five-year strategy announced today. It will also launch a new mid-sized SUV and a large SUV that sit, respectively, below and above the Stelvio, which has brought huge success to Alfa Romeo since launching last year. The Italian brand also confirmed long-wheelbase versions of the Giulia and Stelvio. LWB variants are a growing trend, thanks largely to demand in China, where chauffeur-driven cars are popular. The strategy should mean 400,000 sales for Alfa Romeo by 2022, said brand boss Timothy Kuniskis. This year's sales are projected at 170,000 units. The new additions coming by 2022 will almost double Alfa Romeo's line-up, bringing the range to nine models. Currently, it consists of the Giulia, Giulietta, Stelvio, 4C Spider and Mito. The Mito had been highly tipped to be axed, and although there was no mention of it in today's announcement, a product plan slide suggested that the model will be phased out by 2022. The new 8C will be a twin-turbo mid-engined sports car with an electrified front axle delivering at least 700bhp with a 0-62mph time of less than three seconds. The last time we saw the 8C nameplate was during 2007-2010 with the 8C Competizione, which was a front-engined model that used a 4.7-litre Ferrari-derived V8 and achieved the benchmark sprint in 4.2sec. Meanwhile, the GTV — essentially a coupé version of the well-received Giulia — will have more than 600bhp with E-Boost technology, all-wheel drive torque vectoring, 50/50 weight distribution and room for four occupants. The last GTV went off sale in 2005. Talking about its plans to relaunch the 8C and GTV sports cars, Kuniskis said: "Alfa will deliver the sports car of each segment it enters. We know our future depends on staying true to our sports car roots; cars designed to represent the brand’s position and inspire the next generation of customers. “The 8C is a true supercar with a mid-engined, carbonfibre monocoque chassis and electrified AWD system. It’s a car that will be born for the track here at Bolocco. “We also want a sports car as attainable as it is aspirational, so we’re bringing back one of the most fabled names in Alfa history, the GTV. The Quadrofoglio model will deliver more than 600hp." On the two new SUVS, Kuniskis said: "The timing of our expansion plans couldn’t be more optimum. The premium market is growing and there are considerable opportunities int hat segment. “There are two key segments: compact UV [utility vehicle] and full-sized UV. These segments represent 81% of global premium market growth. We will ensure each new product embraces our brand principles. “What we’ve learned in last four years is that when we stay true to Alfa DNA, we can stand out in any segment, as we did with Stelvio.” He added that, by 2022, Alfa Romeo will compete in more than 70% of the premium industry: “We will launch the sports cars of every segment.” As with all FCA brands, Alfa is phasing out diesel engines from its range, and is launching a range of mild hybrids, hybrids and plug-in hybrids. It aims to offer an electrified version of every model in its range by 2022, including six PHEVs. Alfa’s PHEV system will allow cars to complete around 31 miles on pure electric power, and offer 0-62mph times in the mid-4sec area. All of its models will also offer level two or three autonomous driver assistance systems. Talking of the brand's struggles, FCA CEO Sergio Marchionne said: "We got two things wrong - we underestimated the industrial complexity of launching a brand as complex as Alfa. This caused delays in launch, additional cost, and slowed down the development portfolio. We also underestimated the reaction of Germans to the reintroduction of Alfa." "Would I do it again? Not in the same way, but certainly would do it again."
  19. Hi guys, i just came back fm jb. i did hid single beam taiwan,sun-shade,number plate led light,car mate 5 pcs,the small light on the headlight change to led,door visor mugen,the four door metal plates with lighted blue vios word at the price of S$210 for all and the last offer he gave me was RM$80 for sloar film the whole car except front windscreen but i rejected i find mine pretty alright alredy so dun wan it. It a newly open shop just 2 mths, the boss is very nice guy. Is it all cheap? I think is really cheap. It very near to singapore. If anyone interested i can tell u roughly where it is.
  20. Alheych

    The Maybach is back...

    The Maybach brand has been resurrected. Mercedes-Benz is now using it as a nameplate for the stretched S600L. Wonder how many of those can they sell in Singapore. It should do better than the old Maybach. http://www.autoblog.com/2014/11/19/mercedes-maybach-s600-official/
  21. The company cannot tahan people comment/review and took away the review feature on their FB Retailer can fight back but they are not always the winner. https://www.facebook.com/fantasydesserts.co/
  22. Ktglfc

    Holidaying Back, pls pay GST

    Just a sincere reminder to all our MCFers :) Travellers returning to Singapore to pay GST for shopping purchases Published on May 27, 2014 2:07 PM - See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/more-singapore-stories/story/travellers-returning-singapore-shopping-have-pay-goods-a#sthash.6bT62Xnl.dpuf Travelling this school holidays? Singapore Customs is reminding travellers who return from overseas with shopping worth more than $600 to declare their goods and pay GST on it. More details here: http://bit.ly/1wdg0yR June is coming and that means overseas holidays for many families. But beware of lugging back too much shopping from your jaunts as your spoils could be subject to Goods and Service Tax (GST) once you get home. Singapore Customs has issued an advisory to remind travellers that GST is exempt for only for a certain value. If you travel out of Singapore for less than 48 hours, then you will not have to pay GST for goods valued up to $150. If you are away for more than 48 hours, you are exempt from GST for goods valued up to $600. Travellers will have to pay GST only on the value of the goods that exceeds the GST relief. For example, if you buy $800 worth of goods on a four-day trip to Hong Kong, you will need to pay GST for the $200 worth of goods. At 7 per cent, that comes up to $14. You will have to produce invoices or receipts of these purchases to help calculate the tax payable. You can pay taxes at the Singapore Customs' Tax Payment Office or at the self-service Tax Payment Kiosk at the checkpoints.
  23. Has been suffer from that for like 10 yrs. I had torn ligament and stop running since 2000. and slowly suffer low back pain/sciatica? Some suggest it could be due to the low back spine pressing against my nerves. I wonder what specialist shall I go to? A SGH specialist suggested me to either cycle or swim. I would like to go back to running but... due to the torn ligament. Sigh. Last but not least. torn ligament is on inner right knee and I am bow legged. Anyone can share their experience here if they suffer the same.
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