Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'term'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Cars
    • General Car Discussion
    • Tips and Resources
  • Aftermarket
    • Accessories
    • Performance and Tuning
    • Cosmetics
    • Maintenance & Repairs
    • Detailing
    • Tyres and Rims
    • In-Car-Entertainment
  • Car Brands
    • Japanese Talk
    • Conti Talk
    • Korean Talk
    • American Talk
    • Malaysian Talk
    • China Talk
  • General
    • Motorsports
    • Meetups
    • Complaints
  • Sponsors
    • Products & Services
  • Non-Car Related
    • Lite & EZ
    • Makan Corner
    • Travel & Road Trips
    • Football Channel
    • Hobbies
    • Healthcare & Wellness
    • Property Buzz
    • Investment & Financial Matters
  • MCF Forum Related
    • Official Announcements
    • Feedback & Suggestions
    • FAQ & Help
    • Testing

Blogs

  • MyAutoBlog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 67 results

  1. here's the story Editor's jail, fine reduced 1 1/2-year jail term for dangerous driving reduced upon appeal By Selina Lum IT WAS a day of twists and turns for a newspaper editor in the High Court yesterday as she saw her 1 1/2-year jail term slashed to a day and her $12,000 fine reduced to $2,000. Changes after appeal THE FIRST CHARGE Causing the death of pillion rider Melania Melaniawati, 24, by dangerous driving. Maximum sentence under the law: Up to five years' jail. ... more Lim Hong Eng, the 56-year-old executive editor of Shin Min Daily News, was in court to hear the outcome of the appeal against her sentence for knocking down and injuring a motorcyclist and killing his female pillion rider. The appeal against her conviction was rejected, but the 1 1/2-year jail term dealt by a lower court was cut to a day's jail and a $12,000 fine on two charges. Then, later in the morning, defence lawyers and the prosecutor ran some checks and realised there had been a sentencing error in one of the two charges. The mistake was for the charge of causing death by dangerous driving, for which she was jailed a day and fined $10,000. The Road Traffic Act does not make a provision for a fine for this offence, only jail time. So it was back to court after the lunch hour. Justice Choo Han Teck set aside the $10,000 fine but did not increase the jail term, saying: 'In the circumstances, it will not be right to increase the custodial sentence to the detriment of the accused.' He made it clear, however, that this was a one-off case and was not to be used as a sentencing precedent. Lim will thus only have to go to jail for a day for the charge of causing death by dangerous driving, and pay a $2,000 fine for the other charge. Her counsel Subhas Anandan later told reporters that his client will donate $10,000 to charity. Really a shocker. Just goes to show some people can get away with anything, even when one's at fault.
  2. hi, any recommendation for service apartment for 2 months stay. 2pax only. 1 or 2 rooms is fine. budget $2k to below $3k. preferably in the west. at the budget i guess cannot afford ccr right got a distant relative need to stay for 2 months in spore. thanks!
  3. Quite a healthy lifestyle, never over or under weight all my life. Don't drink or smoke and does half marathon runs weekly. Recently I had a bad issue of upper right back pain (close to spine C7 or T1) and right chest pain (close to Sternum, slightly higher than nipple). Sometimes the pain can extend all the way to the back of my upper right arm and behind the armpit. Saw 2 doctors, took Xrays of right chest and all just gave me anti inflammatory medicine and muscle rub. Breathing is painful, deep breaths are even worse. Many times the pain feels worse after waking up from sleep (why is that so?) Doctors told me it should be cartilage of the ribs and back muscles that are inflamed and overworked. Took the medicine for 2 months and the medication doesn't seem to work. Occasionally it seems to bring down the pain but it will come right back soon after (even without me exercising). Have anybody here deal with this type of pain and how did you manage to overcome the problem? Thanks in advance.
  4. Xi Jinping signals intent to remain in power by revealing politburo with no successor https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/25/xi-jinping-signals-intent-power-successor-politburo-china China’s president unveils his all-male cabinet, but crucially no member is young enough to take the reins from Xi at the end of his second term Xi Jinping has kicked off his second term as leader of the world’s second largest economy, vowing to spearhead the “great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation” and signalling his intent to tower over Chinese politics for decades to come. At just before noon on Wednesday, Xi unveiled the new line-up of China’s top ruling council – the Communist party’s politburo standing committee – leading six besuited comrades out into a blaze of camera flashes in the Great Hall of the People. “Here, on behalf of the newly elected central leadership, I wish to express our heartfelt thanks to all other members of the party for the trust they have placed in us. We will work diligently to meet our duty, fulfil our mission and be worthy of their trust,” Xi said in a 21-minute address that marks the formal start of his second term. Crucially, the all-male group contained no potential successor, since none of its five new members – all aged between 60 and 67 – is young enough to take the reins from Xi after the end of his second term, in 2022, and to then rule for the customary decade. Such is the secrecy that cloaks Chinese politics that the identities of the standing committee’s incoming members were known only as Xi escorted them out onto a scarlet-carpeted stage. Joining Xi and premier Li Keqiang on the elite committee are: Li Zhanshu, 67, Han Zheng, 63, Zhao Leji, 60, Wang Yang, 62 and Wang Huning, 62. “I still can’t get over the fact how the world’s second largest economy, which is declaring this new role of global leadership, is nearly as opaque as the North Korean political system,” said Jude Blanchette, an expert in Chinese politics from New York’s Conference Board research group. “I just find that absolutely striking and in a way almost unacceptable for a system that wants to play such a fundamental role in guiding and shaping the 21st century.” China’s propaganda apparatus has touted this week’s political show as an example of openness and transparency. However, a number of major western news organisations whose coverage of Xi’s rule has irked Beijing were excluded from Wednesday’s event without explanation including the BBC, the Financial Times, the Economist, the New York Times and the Guardian. In his address, Xi outlined his vision for what he called China’s “new era”, an era in which an emboldened and purified Communist party would play an even more prominent role in returning the country to its former glories. “It is my conviction that the great rejuvenation of the Chinese nation will become a reality,” he said, urging his party to become “the backbone of our nation.” “We should never entertain the idea of taking a breather or halting our steps. Instead, we must continue to rid ourselves of any virus that erodes the party’s fabric, make great efforts to foster a healthy political environment of integrity and generate waves of positive energy throughout our party which can build into a mighty nationwide force driving China’s development and progress.” Xi also pledged “a resolute push” to eradicate poverty, to “open China still wider to the world” and hinted at the more assertive and muscular role Beijing is expected to seek on the world stage in the years ahead. “With confidence and pride the Chinese people will be steadfast in upholding our country’s sovereignty, security and development interests,” he said. The unveiling of China’s new ruling council came one day after the end of the 19th party congress, a week-long political summit at which Xi established himself as the country’s most dominant leader since its revolutionary founder Mao Zedong. On Tuesday, Xi’s eponymous political philosophy was enshrined in the party’s constitution alongside those of Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the architect of China’s economic opening to the world. Experts say that momentous and highly symbolic achievement puts Xi in a virtually unassailable position at the pinnacle of the 89 million member organisation. Having failed to anoint a successor, he is now likely to be calling the shots in Chinese politics well into the 2030s. With Xi now entering his second, although perhaps no longer final five-year term, thoughts are turning to what the next stage of the Xi era might hold. Supporters claim that having used a ferocious anti-corruption campaign to purge rivals and consolidate his grip over the party during his first five-year term, Xi will now turn his mind to comprehensive reforms of China’s economy. “I think the real reform just began,” said Wang Wen, a pro-establishment scholar from a thinktank linked to Renmin University. Wang argued that Xi would enter his second term with “much more authority” and a greater ability to implement his blueprint for China. Such optimism was echoed in China’s party-run media on Wednesday as cadres lined up to heap praise on their all-powerful leader. “We firmly believe that if people all over the country roll up their sleeves under the guidance of Xi’s Thought … we will move steadily into the future with the irresistible force of a high-speed train,” Chen Meifang, a Shanghai railway official, was quoted astelling the Beijing Daily. However, such hopefulness is widely disputed. Blanchette said he expected to see a “super-sized version” of Xi’s first-term policies in his second stint, as China’s leader pursued what he saw as his “program of Chinese greatness”. That would mean accelerating efforts to build a modern, battle-ready military that could begin to push the United States further and further out of what China saw as its Pacific backyard; an increasingly assertive foreign policy in regions such as the South and East China seas; and continued efforts to promote a hi-tech economic revolution by championing huge companies that were either controlled or heavily aligned with the state. It would also mean that the Communist party – and the Communist party only – would continue to lay down the law, in all aspects of Chinese society. In an editorial celebrating the start of Xi’s “new era” on Wednesday, the People’s Daily, the party’s mouthpiece, argued: “History has shown and will continue to show that without the leadership of the Chinese Communist party, the idea of national rejuvenation is a fantasy.” “We should hunker in for a long winter of tight political control,” Blanchette predicted. We should hunker in for a long winter of tight political control Jude Blanchette Elizabeth Economy, the director for Asia studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, said she saw this week’s congress “as affirmation of the direction in which Xi has already been moving the party as opposed to a point at which now we are going to see the real Xi Jinping and his real reforms emerge”. She added: “I think what we are going to see is an intensification along the same lines.” Economy balked at the suggestion that Xi – whose first term has witnessed an unusually fierce crackdown on party opponents and human rights – might suddenly emerge as a political reformer. “I don’t think a crypto-liberal would do what he has been doing over the past five years. I don’t think a crypto-liberal lets Liu Xiaobo die in jail, and the arrests and the intensification of the attacks on the [human rights] lawyers. That is not a crypto-liberal,” she said. Blanchette said Xi had shown a remarkable “mastery of the political system” in China during his first term in power: “The second question though is does that mean he has an omniscience or an omnipotence to deal with all the significant challenges that China is facing? “There is a huge list of challenges that Xi Jinping has to deal with,” he added, pointing to a gradually slowing economy, a looming debt crisis and the possibility of a nuclear conflagration on its doorstep. “He now has the power to do it. But how he deals with these challenges will be one of the most important indicators of whether or not he is able to stay on for the term that he feels he deserves.” Additional reporting by Wang Zhen. What 'Xi Jinping Thought' Stands For https://www.forbes.com/sites/salvatorebabones/2017/10/22/what-does-xi-jinping-thought-mean-and-how-does-it-compare-to-america-first/#2bfee5ab3262 Xi Jinping is universally regarded as China's most powerful leader since Deng Xiaoping, and perhaps since Mao Zedong. Both Deng and Mao left their marks in the charter of the Communist Party of China, and the rumor is that Xi will be their first successor to do the same. Mao's "mass line" and Deng's "seeking truth from facts" have become official tenets of Communist Party dogma. Xi's "socialism with Chinese characteristics for a new era" may soon join these august concepts as official truth. But just what does "Xi Jinping Thought" really consist of? To answer that question, it helps to compare Xi's governing principles to those of the four preceding "paramount leaders" of China's Communist Party. Xi versus Mao Xi Jinping is most often compared to Mao Zedong, China's revolutionary leader, red emperor and communist theologian. Mao's political maxims were collected in the Little Red Book once read by leftist college students and Latin American guerillas. Mao Zedong thought is not all that bad, if you happen to be planning a people's revolution to overthrow your government. Unlike Lenin and most European Marxists, Mao taught that revolutions had to come from below. And unlike most revolutionaries, he still fought to overthrow the government even when he was the government. The infamous Cultural Revolution that rocked Chinese society from 1966-1976 was the result. Xi is no revolutionary, and he is certainly no Mao. Xi'sChinese Dream is a "moderately prosperous society," not a communist utopia. Xi does talk a lot about "national rejuvenation," but that's really just a way to avoid using the Western word for what he really means: renaissance. Xi's Chinese renaissance is all about China's space program, high speed rail network and high technology parks. But a real Chinese renaissance requires the reversal of China's long-term brain drain to the United States and other English-speaking countries. The problem? Most Chinese scientists are unwilling to give up their tenured positions overseas to take a chance on a permanent return to China. Barring a reversal of epic proportions, in 2021 Xi will preside over the centenary of the Chinese Communist Party. That will be as good a time as any to finally lay Mao Zedong Thought to rest for good. If Xi has his way, they may just take the opportunity to bury Mao along with it. He's been waiting long enough. Xi versus Deng Soon after the death of Mao, his long-time frenemy Deng Xiaoping put paid to the Cultural Revolution and started China on the path to opening and reform that it has followed for the last 40 years. Famous for saying that it was OK for some people to get rich before others, Deng was repeatedly condemned by Mao as a "capitalist roader" -- which, as soon as Mao died, is exactly what he turned out to be. To facilitate his economic reform agenda, Deng urged that China should "keep a low profile" in international affairs, biding its time while building its strength. Xi'sstrive for achievement strategy couldn't be more different. In his landmark Communist Party Congress speech, Xi pledged that China would have a "world class" military by 2050, in line with his policy of relentless maritime expansion in the South China Sea. Xi has departed radically from Deng's advice on foreign policy, but what Xi shares with Deng is a staunchly conservative preference for order over chaos. Deng ruthlessly suppressed the Tiananmen Square democracy movement in order to preserve the rule of the Communist Party. Xi has much more subtly turned the screws on political dissent using the more discriminating but perhaps more effective tools of online surveillanceand selective imprisonment. As the ever-quotable Deng said himself, "it doesn't matter whether the cat is black or white, as long as it catches mice." Xi versus Jiang Deng Xiaoing's successor Jiang Zemin is perhaps best remembered for the fact that everything done under his leadership was done "with Chinese characteristics." Deng may have coined the phrase "socialism with Chinese characteristics" to justify his introduction of the market into China's planned economy, but under Jiangthe phrase became a standing joke. Jiang Zemin codified these Chinese characteristics into the "Three Represents": the idea that in addition to the poor, the Communist Party of China would also represent China's business and cultural elites. Under Xi, this has evolved into the Two Represents, and if China's new rich get their way it may soon degenerate back into a novel kind of One Represent. Xi versus Hu Hu Jintao's major contribution to the intellectual life of the Communist Party was to bring Confucius back into the fold. Long prescribed under Mao as the reactionary idol of the pre-revolutionary patriarchy, today Confucius is back in China, with no small thanks to Hu, who rehabilitated Confucian thought, reopened Confucian temples, and chartered the Confucius Institutes to become China's cultural ambassadors to the world. Hu's trademark slogan was the "harmonious society" -- i.e., trust the government and don't complain and everyone can live in harmony. No word on what thenotoriously cranky sage, who got himself successively kicked out of ten different countries for criticizing their poor leadership, might have thought of this. Hu later extended the harmonious society to the harmonious world (i.e., trust China and don't complain and the world can live in harmony). With his One Belt, One Road expansionism and South China Sea island building, Xi seems keen to continue Hu's expansive foreign policy program, only with even less emphasis on the "harmonious" part of the equation. "Party First" Xi Jinping Thought, in a nutshell, seems to boil down to something resembling "America First, with Chinese Characteristics." By all accounts, Xi and U.S. President Donald Trump got along surprisingly well at their first meeting in April, perhaps because at a level deeper than mere speech they spoke the same language. If Xi's political philosophy isn't exactly China First, it is something close to it but at the same time distinctively Chinese: something like "Party First." And putting the interests of the Communist Party first is one thing he shares with all of his predecessors. Like Deng, Xi is a pragmatist who will stay on the capitalist road so long as it leads to much greater wealth than any other. Like Jiang, he is very happy to lead a ruling party dominated by his country's business elite. Like his immediate predecessor Hu, he is crafty enough to use patriotism and ethnic pride as tools to keep ordinary Chinese (if not necessarily China's minority groups) on his side. And like Mao, Xi seems to be ruthless enough to succeed in making his own Chinese Dream a reality. As long as he continues to put the Party first, Xi is likely to maintain his grip on power -- and the Party's loyalty. And as long as the Party puts Xi first, he is likely to have no cause to complain. Xi Jinping Thought may not sell as many books as Mao's did, but come 2021 it will be Xi who sets the course for the next 100 years of the Communist Party of China.
  5. Hi, Anyone know good and cheap car rental from any car rental company or personal? Am looking for long term (6mths ~ 1yr) and only want to drive from Mon ~ Thur (the owner can have the car back from Fri ~ Sun). Thanks. Batbat
  6. Hi, i am new here. my business with my biz partner just started. And recently just bought a proton Savvy (left 6 months) to drive for short term. But I will not wait till i drive till the tail end and then exploring which other option to go for. I would probably go for cars that is left 1-2 years, something that doesn't need me to fork out too much cash and tie over for the next 1 year and once my biz become stabilized or has the ability to upgrade to better car, then we will change. OR, buy a commercial van which is way cheaper to drive thru this short period...... any expert?
  7. Need a 1-2 month rental car, but cheap. Any lobang ? Thanks in advance.
  8. Hi all, Anyone got a spare wheelchair lying around wife just finished knee ops and not steady/comfortable walking with clutches, just need to loan for about 4 to 6 weeks before she could start her physio therapy. Many thanks in advance
  9. Shouyi

    Term Insurance

    Hi, anyone knows what is the difference between Group Term Insurance and Personal Term Insurance? And what is the pros and cons of both? Thanks!
  10. Over trade ??...is this a gimmick ?? Left pocket right pocket ?. Sell high = buy high ?
  11. Will be back in Singapore end of this month for just 2 weeks with my family. Need an apartment for short term stay that can accommodate 4 people. Anybody has affordable apartment to let? Or where to go to find one?
  12. http://www.sgcarmart.com/main/info-20jQ24hw-1000.html Hiya all, helping my wife get some opinions as she is thinking of getting a COE car and this one above fits her budget.....should she send it for inspection ??me dun really noe abt swifts so dunno its reliability isues for such an old car.. thanks all in advance
  13. http://www.sgcarmart.com/used_cars/info.ph...184&DL=1000 Upgrading. Sad to see my car go after time and money spent to do it up. Anyone keen to adopt her?
  14. Was having a chat with a friend who'd been buying Silver every month for investment (paper and actual silver) Why silver I ask, as compare to gold, he say Silver fluctuate more than gold. I'm a bit skepticle on this fluctuation thingi. is it true that Silver is a better investment commodity compare to gold? and where can you buy gold in singapore? UOB? what are other charges besides the implied 7% GST? I'm looking at setting aside a few hundred every month to load up bits by bits...
  15. can we change our ins company mid-way thru the term for the same car ? coz i just bought a used car and the dealer insist on doing the ins .... and it cost almost $400 more than my current car. (dun think too much ... almost same type of car) i told them i wanted to ask my current insurer to quote but they say cannot. so can i take what they get for me and then maybe 2 months down, switch another insurer ?
  16. Hi, if you are looking forward to lease a car or lease out your car on a long term basis (minimum 3 months), please send me a PM.
  17. For those Bro whom are familiar with Melbourne, which neighbourhood would you choose to stay for long term?
  18. Ronnieseah

    Long term visit pass

    anyone have friends or colleagues that are both PR couple that manage to get their parent a long term social visit pass?
  19. My dad told me he got one and will be cashing out soon at maturity. I google a little and it doesnt look optimistic.... http://www.reach.gov.sg/YourSay/BlogUs/tab.../3/Default.aspx? ssFormAction=%5B%5BssBlogThread_VIEW% 5D%5D&tid=%5B%5B8129%5D%5D
  20. Went to ICA to try renewing LTVP for my parents and found that the process has become more complex and stricter now. Need 3 years of income tax, employer's letter confirming salary and employment, CPF contribution... Macam like I want to apply PR for myself. Don't understand why so strict. It's not like they are here for any social benefit nor do they vie for a job here.... I wonder what would have happened if I had chosen the job in Japan. Would that mean their renewal will be rejected?
  21. You know... A(no licence) owns the car but he is definately not driving the car cause no licence so he will have a Named Main Driver in the policy. there is a technical term for this type of policy.. what huh? something like non-driver or other-driver... just cannot remember...
  22. Hi all, would like to check with the bros/sis here on the comments on these two types of life insurance. Which would be a better form of protection??? Regards
  23. Ahtong

    Will Obama get a 2nd term?

    I must say his term is rather Tiger head Snake tail. Got elected on a surge of Hope and Change but it got bogged down by partisan politics and petered out after that. For his whole term he has been skirting the issue of gay mariage but now he is in support of it. Signs of desperation?
  24. I'm letting go my 2008 520i for long term at $2000 per month. Black car with black interior (whole car in stock condition) Please contact me at 82012515 for more details. 2 months deposit needed.
  25. I'm letting go my 2008 520i for long term at $2000 per month. Black car with black interior (whole car in stock condition) Please contact me at 82012515 for more details. 2 months deposit needed.
×