Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'sport'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Cars
    • General Car Discussion
    • Tips and Resources
  • Aftermarket
    • Accessories
    • Performance and Tuning
    • Cosmetics
    • Maintenance & Repairs
    • Detailing
    • Tyres and Rims
    • In-Car-Entertainment
  • Car Brands
    • Japanese Talk
    • Conti Talk
    • Korean Talk
    • American Talk
    • Malaysian Talk
    • China Talk
  • General
    • Motorsports
    • Meetups
    • Complaints
  • Sponsors
    • Products & Services
  • Non-Car Related
    • Lite & EZ
    • Makan Corner
    • Travel & Road Trips
    • Football Channel
    • Hobbies
    • Healthcare & Wellness
    • Property Buzz
    • Investment & Financial Matters
  • MCF Forum Related
    • Official Announcements
    • Feedback & Suggestions
    • FAQ & Help
    • Testing

Blogs

  • MyAutoBlog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 224 results

  1. Since this is a new model, I think it warranty a new thread to set it apart from the old Swifts The official announcement with happen at Frankfurt Motorshow next week. Anyone as hyped up as me? The info we know so far: Car is slightly larger than previous Swifts, but you cannot tell unless you compare side by side. 1.4 Direct Injected intercooled (front mounted) Turbo, Euro 6 compliant 140ps @ 5500rpm 230nm @ 2500-3500rpm (That's higher than normal turbo range, optimized more for performance) 970kg for MT, 990kg for AT 6MT or tipronic 6AT(They ditched the CVT) 17" rims cruise control and Bluetooth with LED display fabric and leather hybrid sport seats Collision mitigation for higher JDM spec, not sure if it will come locally. JDM release date​ this Month 2017 so PI can start bringing them soon. 0-100 not recorded but based on specs and weight should be in the sub-7 secs The cheapest trim is selling at 1.7 milllion yen, after conversion is around $21kSGD for the OMV.Based calculations of PARF and current cat B COE, the car should be around 120k bracket plus minus. Anyone's radar on this? Close up Interior Zhnged version
  2. Carbon82

    2020 4th Generation Audi A3 / S3

    Audi‘s next generation S3 model will also be available in Sedan form, featuring the same updated design and improved tech as its hatchback sibling. We can see loads of sporty-looking bits underneath this prototype’s camouflage, such as the chunky front and rear spoilers, large dual-spoke wheels and most of all, the quad exhaust pipe setup which points to this being anything but slow in a straight line. The new S3 Sedan will boast the same hexagonal grille and updated headlights as the rest of the fourth-gen Audi A3s. Still, the front bumper will feature bigger intakes, the profile will have more pronounced side sills, and the wheels will be bigger. At the rear, expect a slightly more elegant design compared to the current iteration, as well as updated taillights with modern graphics. The interior of the next A3, regardless of variant, will have a surprisingly angular design judging by previous images. The dashboard is also driver-oriented, and is expected to feature the automaker’s 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster as well as the latest in infotainment software. Under the skin we expect a similar setup to what’s available right now, namely a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder mated to a seven-speed dual-clutch and Quattro all-wheel drive, altough power and torque figures could increase from the current model’s 295 HP (300 PS) and 295 lb-ft (400 Nm). Its main competitor, the CLA 35, has 302 HP (306 PS) and 295 lb-ft (400 Nm), so a slight bump is not out of the question. Since it’s possible we’ll see the all-new A3 and A3 Sedan debut before the end of this year, the more performance-oriented S3 will likely show up in 2020.
  3. Divers

    Michelin Pilot Sport 4

    Dear all, We can soon see Michelin sport 4. http://tyresearch.telegraph.co.uk/r-new-tyres-advice/the-michelin-pilot-sport-4-on-show-at-frankfurt-27847 The Michelin Pilot Sport 4 on show at Frankfurt New tyres Tyre manufacturer Michelin is showcasing its new sports tyre, the Pilot Sport 4, at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show. A much anticipated tyre that is up against some keen competition. Michelin’s long-awaited new summer sports tyre, the Pilot Sport 4, is finally on show at the Frankfurt Motor Show. - Copyright © : Michelin On the same topicMichelin launches it new sports tyre, the Michelin Pilot Sport 3 Continental SportContact 6: Rezulteo’s test Firestone Multiseason, an all season tyre for city cars Competition in the sport’s tyre segment is rife, while Continental has just launched the SportContact 6, Michelin is currently presenting the latest addition to its Pilot Sport range at the Frankfurt Motor Show. The Pilot Sport range has earned a solid reputation, especially for its most versatile version which until now was the Pilot Sport 3, a tyre available on the market since 2010. To ensure continuity, the PS4 goes even further than its predecessor offering significant progress in several areas, mainly thanks to Michelin’s experience in racing. Driving pleasureLogically, the Pilot Sport 4 places the emphasis on driving sensations and pure efficiency. For this, its structure features a reinforced belt to keep any tyre deformation to a minimum and, as a result, improves driving precision, dynamic response and of course, the level of pure grip. Copyright © : Michelin Geared towards safetyThe PS4 is a tyre designed to equip passenger cars. As such, it must deliver an excellent level of safety in all weather conditions. Its new tread compound has been developed with this in mind, just like its wide grooves providing efficient water evacuation. However, the brief presentation did not provide any further information about this new Michelin tyre. We hope to compare it with other reference tyres in the high performance segment in the near future to truly evaluate its potential. Let’s hope it achieves its efficiency. AvailabilityThe Pilot Sport 4 will be available on the market in January 2016, and initially, only in 17- and 18-inch sizes. New sizes will be available later, and in particular, 19-inch sizes. Copyright © : Michelin
  4. Hi Guys, I find Astra GTC is quite funky and energetic but Golf 1.4 TSI is popular among buyers. Under the boot, GTC churns out less 20 horeses than its counterpart Golf 1.4 TSI. There are quite a number of Golfs on the road but find that Astra GTC is hard to spot on. What are your opinions on these 2 cars? Would like to hear pros and cons from serious ownership's view.
  5. Rayoflight

    New Land Rover Discovery Sport

    http://www.sgcarmart.com/new_cars/newcars_overview.php?CarCode=11648 Anyone saw this suv in showroom yet? Looks very much like Evoque but with a longer rear (7seater)..looking for a SUV for my dad. :) Infact i think i want this for my next car haha
  6. chitchatboy

    Bugatti Chiron Sport does top speed run

    Bugatti claims that the Chiron Sport can hit 420km/h flat out. But is it true? Top Gear's Charlie Turner has been given the chance to experience a top speed run in a Chiron Sport at Volkswagen's Ehra-Lessien test track. In its video, Turner can be seen accessing the full potential of the Chiron with a special key that activates the “high speed” mode. With the correct tyre pressures and car warmed up, he lines the car up after the turn at 200km/h before giving it all. With a straight of more than 8km long, the 8.0-litre, quad-turbo W16-equipped Chiron Sport unleashes all its 1479bhp, allowing Turner to easily go into the 400km/h range quite easily. Eventually, we see in the video that Turner managed to hit 423km/h, showcasing the genius engineering that went into its creation.
  7. Anyone here bought it? Any review and comments?
  8. Hi, Would like to check if CM models ZC31S original audio system is able to connect bluetooth & play music. Thanks in advance !
  9. Hi bros, anyone any comments on this car? Quite a good proposition (at least for my needs)... Worry about FC and maintenance. OMV= $25-26k Selling= $95.8k or $96.6k http://www.vwasia.com/publish/vwasia/singa...els/touran.html
  10. chitchatboy

    Six new RS models from Audi Sport

    Audi has released a teaser image showing six upcoming models in celebration of the 25th anniversary of its RS models. With Audi not saying what these car shadows could be, we are guessing the first two to be the new RS6 Avant and RS7 Sportback. They are expected to use the familiar 4.0-litre V8 turbocharged engine that will have more than 600bhp. The next two is a mystery but it does look like it could RS Q3 and RS Q3 Sportback. Expect the compact SUVs to be equipped with a turbocharged 2.5-litre five-cylinder engine that produces more than 400bhp. Next up is also a wild guess but we are betting it to be the new facelifted RS4 Avant. It will likely be using the same turbocharged 2.9-litre V6 engine that develops 444bhp in the current model. Finally, the largest shadow is probably the RS Q8, a sister car to the Lamborghini Urus. It remains to be seen on whether it will have the same power output as the Urus but is likely to use the same 4.0-litre V8 turbocharged engine present in the Lamborghini SUV.
  11. Hi, Anyone use Bridgestone techno sport tyres before? Any review will be much appreciated. Time to change tyres for my ride.
  12. I just changed the tires few days ago , since they having a sale fast hand and legs got it installed ( my review since many donkey years back) it's quiet compare to my old p zero , prolly sidewall is bit softer vs italian , but comfort wise is not bad, grip is good and no screeching sound when corner hard . so far that's all i found out.
  13. Suzuki has released a new limited edition model of its Swift Sport for the people living in the Netherlands with quite a few upgrades. For those who don't ride, the name Katana is one of the company’s most iconic motorcycles launched in 1981, which also happened to make a return for 2019. Paying tribute to the Suzuki Katana motorcycle, the warm hatch is only available in Premium Silver Metallic and Super Black Pearl. Other than the decals and graphics shown in the photos, it is cool to note that each car will have a serial number near its c-pillar too. Moving on to the more interesting upgrades, the car gets black OZ 18-inch wheels wrapped with Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tyres, grey bumper trims and side skirts with a carbon fiber look. It also receives a lowered adjustable suspension, a strut bar, and an upgraded exhaust system. Unfortunately, there is no mention any increase in horsepower. Inside, a thicker sports steering wheel with a Katana badge and partial leather seats with embroidered Katana lettering provide some of the larger change. Owners might also be able to spoil several other Katana symbols around the car's floor mats and trimmings. Only 30 units will be built and the car will only be available in The Netherlands.
  14. Honestly, I can't tell that it is a new gen Cayenne with just a quick glance at the photos, too evolutionary imo. Like many I am guessing that Dieselgate is hitting hard on VAG and budget cut on the development of newer Porsche model are evident... The new SUV will be officially unveiled tonight / tomorrow morning. Stay tune for more updates.
  15. The replacement for the Pilot Super Sport, the Pilot Sport 4S, is the culmination of a lot of behind the scenes work. http://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/car-technology/videos/a32408/michelin-pilot-sport-4-s-engineering-explained/ MICHELIN’S NEW ULTRAHIGH PERFORMANCE TIRE CAN MAKE ANY CAR FEEL LIKE A SUPERCAR http://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/michelin-pilot-sport-4-s-testing/
  16. Carbon82

    2nd Generation Audi A5 / RS5

    The new generation of the Audi A5 will be officially revealed on June 2 with the company live-streaming the event online. The two-door version of the A4 is expected to be lighter by up to 100kg (220 pounds) and offer more room inside, courtesy of a longer wheelbase. The engine range will mirror that of the A4 as well, meaning a wide selection of turbocharged four-cylinder petrol and diesel engines, with more expensive versions coming with either a petrol or a diesel V6 turbocharged unit. Audi has been teasing its new coupe with a series of animated gifs on its social media for a while now, revealing design details like the front headlight treatment and the curvy rear quarters of the bodywork. Features like the Virtual Cockpit digital display is also present as expected. Apart for the two-door bodystyle, the new A5 will also get a convertible and a Sportback variant. Audi has been caught testing the range-topping RS5 which is reportedly going to use a turbocharged 3.0-litre V6 unit in the place of the naturally aspirated 4.2-litre V8, with an output close to 500hp.
  17. Angelvine

    Any nice coupe?

    Hi member, my car coe going to end, looking for any nice 2 door car best only 2 Seater, any suggestions?
  18. Hi guys, Starting the v2.0 of this thread, since the previous one is full.
  19. kobayashiGT

    Kallang Wave SportsHub

    Mall at Singapore Sports Hub to be named Kallang Wave By Christopher Tan SMRT and NTUC Fairprice have named their joint venture mall at the Singapore Sports Hub Kallang Wave. The 41,000sqm retail venue is targeted for a July opening although some outlets may start business from mid-June. Anchor tenants include supermarket Fairprice, clothing store chain H&M and electronics chain Harvey Norman. Rental of retail space has emerged as public transport operator SMRT's top income generator. - See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/more-singapore-stories/story/mall-singapore-sports-hub-be-named-kallang-wave-20140514#sthash.rihvpNqJ.dpuf
  20. Dear all. All new Continental Sport contact 6 launched. But think targeted at 19 to 22 inch. Maybe just launch. Wonder when will arrive in our shore. http://www.tyrereviews.co.uk/Article/Continental-Sport-Contact-6-First-Drive.htm The Continental Sport Contact 6 is here, and it's fantastic! Launched 1st September, the new Sport Contact 6 replaces the Sport Contact 5P as Continentals maximum performance summer tyre for sports cars. Initially available in 19 to 23 inches, the Sport Contact 6 pushes the tyre towards the segment the Michelin Pilot SuperSport currently occupies, and while it's not quite as track orientated, it should give the Michelin a little competition for those who enjoy fast road driving. Already ProvenWhile the Sport Contact 6 is new to market, it's already a proven tyre. The Sport Contact 6 is the OE tyre for the new Honda Civic Type R, which recently destroyed the Nurburgring FWD record, setting a 7:50.63, only 10 seconds slower than a Porsche Cayman GT4! To further prove the capabilities of the new tyre, Continental invited TyreReviews to Bilster Berg Race Resort in Germany to learn about, and test the Sport Contact 6. DevelopmentOur biggest criticism of the outgoing tyre has always been steering feel. The Sport Contact 5 and 5P were never short of wet grip, wet or dry braking performance, or even good levels of comfort, but for a sports tyre they felt sluggish, soft and frankly, unsporty. The engineers at Continental have worked hard to address this. They've designed the tread pattern with "force vectoring", which helps transfer the forces more evenly through the tyre to give a stable cornering force, and added a new "Aralon 350" belt to the carcass, to give the tyre structure higher stability at speed. We'll cover both these technologies in detail over the next few days, but the simple version is they give the tyre a 14% better steering precision over the Sport Contact 5P and 11% better dry handling. When combined with 7% better wear (another weakness of the outgoing tyre), 7% less noise and 10% higher high speed stability, the result is a very capable tyre. Our TestingSadly at the launch Continental didn't provide the previous tyre to directly compare against, but what they did offer us was the ability to run on the tyre in both the dry and wet, on various vehicles. In the dry, on a VW Golf R, the tyre was impressive. Bilster Berg might have a new surface with a high coefficient of grip, but the tyre was still monstered the lap, giving plenty of lovely feedback right to the limit, and a nice progressive slide past the limit. The same was true of the tyre on the Porsche Cayman GTS, Mercedes A45 and Audi RS3 in the wet, with the Sport Contact 6 harnessing the all wheel drive nature of the Audi and Mercedes to provide quite astonishing traction, and when using the RWD Porsche in torrential rain, still providing incredible grip, communication and balance. ConclusionContinental simply don't make bad tyres, and while the Sport Contact 5 and 5P never really excited us, they were nearly always best in class when tested. Now with the Sport Contact 6, Continental have produced an exciting, world class sport tyre. Tyre tests in 2016 are going to be extremely interesting! If you're interested in the technical details we'll be publishing a technical report on the Sport Contact 6 over the next few days, otherwise be sure to leave a review if you buy yourself a set. Launch Sizes255/30ZR19 (91Y) XL FR SportContact 6 265/30ZR19 (93Y) XL FR SportContact 6 275/30ZR19 (96Y) XL FR SportContact 6 295/30ZR19 (100Y) XL FR SportContact 6 305/30ZR19 (102Y) XL FR SportContact 6 225/35ZR19 (88Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/35ZR19 (93Y) XL FR SportContact 6 265/35ZR19 (98Y) XL FR SportContact 6 275/35ZR19 (100Y) XL FR SportContact 6 285/35ZR19 (103Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/40ZR19 (98Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/40ZR19 (100Y) XL FR SportContact 6 295/25ZR20 (95Y) XL FR SportContact 6 305/25ZR20 (97Y) XL FR SportContact 6 325/25ZR20 (101Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/30ZR20 (90Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/30ZR20 (92Y) XL FR SportContact 6 275/30ZR20 (97Y) XL FR SportContact 6 225/35ZR20 (90Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/35ZR20 (95Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/35ZR20 (97Y) XL FR SportContact 6 275/35ZR20 (102Y) XL FR SportContact 6 295/25ZR21 (96Y) XL FR SportContact 6 325/25ZR21 (102Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/30ZR21 (93Y) XL FR SportContact 6 265/30ZR21 (96Y) XL FR SportContact 6 295/30ZR21 (102Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/35ZR21 (98Y) XL FR SportContact 6 305/25ZR22 (99Y) XL FR SportContact 6 265/30ZR22 (97Y) XL FR SportContact 6 335/25ZR22 (105Y) XL FR SportContact 6 295/30ZR22 (103Y) XL FR SportContact 6 315/25ZR23 (102Y) XL FR SportContact 6 255/35ZR19 (96Y) XL FR SportContact 6 225/40ZR19 (93Y) XL FR SportContact 6 305/30ZR20 (103Y) XL FR SportContact 6 235/30ZR20 (88Y) XL FR SportContact 6 315/25ZR19 (98Y) XL FR SportContact 6 235/35ZR19 (91Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/35ZR19 93Y XL FR SportContact 6 MO 265/35ZR19 98Y XL FR SportContact 6 MO 245/40R19 98Y XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 235/35ZR20 (92Y) XL FR SportContact 6 265/35ZR20 (99Y) XL FR SportContact 6 245/30ZR20 (90Y) XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 305/30ZR20 (103Y) XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 245/35ZR19 (93Y) XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 295/35ZR19 (104Y) XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 255/30ZR20 92Y XL FR SportContact 6 RO1 245/35R19 93Y XL FR SportContact
  21. Anyone can recommend dented sport rim repair in Singapore near Ubi or Kaki bukit area ?
  22. Just took over a used Lancer GLX sport (Auto) (2007) version. Mileage is around 65K. Any thing i should take note of ? Like change timing belt ? and what are the thing in the engine i need to take note of ? BTW, what the difference between GLX sport and GLX ?
  23. Sokinky

    Wtb swift sport owner manual

    any 1 selling swift sport owner's manual?? thks in advance..
  24. The new Gran Turismo Sport for Playstation 4 review http://www.ign.com/articles/2017/10/17/gran-turismo-sport-review Gran Turismo Sport is a very well-crafted online racing destination. It’s serious, sensible, structured, and – unlike Sony’s previous first-party racing game, DriveClub – it’s been reliable since launch. It’s also supremely good-looking, well-presented, and handles great. However, the hard pivot to an online-focused racing sim has seen it lose a slab of its single-player mode, it lacks meaningful weather effects, and its garage and track selection is startlingly stingy next to the competition. While the spotlight has shifted to online racing, I still started my GT Sportjourney in the solo Campaign Mode. Here, that’s a series of license trials, racing scenarios, endurance tests, and hot lap challenges. It wasn’t long until I got the bug for compulsively restarting and retrying them, aiming for gold or bust and besting my friends’ times. It’s a pretty fractured assortment of activities, but they’re fun and technical and it’s a mode I’m genuinely enjoying. Is it a replacement for a championship-based, single-player racing career mode, à la Project CARS 2? No, and nor does it fill the void left by the absence of the usual full-fat GT Mode. However, it is very different to what everyone else is doing right now. To be fair, in a year where racing gamers are more spoiled for choice than ever, different isn’t really a dirty word. The eclectic nature of Campaign Mode quickly educated me in the nuances of GT Sport’s handling model, and overall it’s good stuff. You can’t really hustle and wrestle the cars through corners quite like you can in Project CARS 2 and Assetto Corsa, but it’s certainly a shade more severe than Forza. Weight transfer is especially pronounced in road cars where gentle steering input and measured braking is rewarded. Race cars permit more aggression, being much stiffer and capable of hugging the track surface more tenaciously, but only up to the limit of grip. Things aren’t perfect when you break traction as the grip still kind of drops off a cliff. It’s solid on a pad or a wheel, though. Pad setup offers several straightforward options regarding your steering, throttle, and braking inputs, and GT Sport feels quite at home with a controller. I haven’t found myself at a disadvantage using a controller to chase the gold time limits on some of the trickier tests. Smooth, flowing directional changes are possible so, with a little finesse, you shouldn’t find yourself jerking around the track and causing bedlam online. On wheels I’m also happy; the force feedback is perhaps slightly heavy by default on both our G29 and the new Thrustmaster T-GT, but knocked down a notch or two I quite like the feel (it’s just a little more sedate than last month’s Project CARS 2). The T-GT, which was developed in conjunction with GT Sport itself, is capable of some pretty amazing feedback witchcraft (delivering a wide spread of faint feedback cues simultaneously) but it does cost a kidney and change. The cars sound vastly better than previous GT games, too. It’s not class-leading (that title is probably shared by Project CARS 2 and RaceRoom Racing Experience) but it’s so much more nuanced, with exhaust crackle layered over drivetrain whine and various transmission noises. It’s such a step-up for the series, which has always lagged behind in the audio department. In fact, besides the well-honed online environment I don’t think there’s anything in GT Sport that has seen a more drastic improvement than the sound. That PvP online environment, or Sport Mode as its dubbed, is where developer Polyphony Digital has gambled all its chips. The good news is that it has indeed created a sturdy online racing venue. Sport Mode is spread across a trio of rotating daily races – it’s generally one every 20 minutes, rotating hourly – as well as scheduled championships (though those are yet to begin, with the first one scheduled for November 3). In terms of the daily events, all you need to do is sign up for the race, spend the remaining time qualifying, and GT Sport will seed you into an event against a full grid of human opponents. It’s simple stuff, but the scheduled nature of it has meant I’m almost always racing in full lobbies against 20+ other people. When the event is on a suitable track I’ve had some decent, fair races so far, only occasionally marred by lapped players trying to cannon into me like pissed-off Sebastian Vettels. That’s an issue GT Sport attempts to solve with its “Sportsmanship Rating” – which is listed beside your PSN ID for all racers to see – and should eventually see me placed out of reach of these dangerous hooligan players. More or less a direct lift of iRacing’s safety rating, GT Sport’s Sportsmanship Rating rewards clean sectors, fair overtakes, and respectful racing. Crash into others and it will sink. All this happens on-screen in real-time so there’s a very obvious and instant punishment for messing up and making contact. The system is less than perfect – both drivers in a collision are penalised regardless of who is at fault, for instance – but my rating is still improving after every race overall. Well, except for any events on the tiny, chaotic Northern Isle Speedway; it’s a (very) short oval that has turned into an absolute melee every time I’ve tried it, despite the best efforts of everyone involved. It can be lapped in around 13 seconds in a GT3 car, and starting at the front of the grid I’ve found myself lapping backmarkers after the first lap. It’s just a mess of spinning, crashing, ghosted cars. It’s been hell on my Sportsmanship Rating because it’s impossible not to have multiple people hit you on such a tiny course. All of that requires an internet connection; if you don’t want to or can’t race online, Arcade Mode is all that’s left. This is where the impressive PlayStation VR functionality sits too – it’s limited to one-on-one battles against the AI, but with a wheel, it’s a terrific entry-level advertisement for just how immersive VR can be. Importantly, the view is very stable and far superior to DriveClub VR, which simulated head tilting and seemed determined to summon up a breakfast barf. Track resolution takes a walloping at distance, but close up things look very nice. I particularly like how the HUD is holographically integrated into the cabin, and little touches like how my in-game driver would slightly drop a shoulder to cater for me leaning to one side in real life didn’t go unnoticed. To reiterate, Arcade Mode is the only part of GT Sport that works offline – you can’t do driving tests, buy cars, take pictures in the eye-catching photo mode, or even save progress unless you’re connected to the PSN. If you can’t connect regularly, you probably shouldn’t be even considering GT Sport. But if you’re happy to commit to remaining online, my advice is to try Sport mode. I’m absolutely not an esports guy and I’ve warmed to it nonetheless. I think what I’m enjoying most about the online racing is the anticipation and excitement that comes from committing myself to a scheduled block of organised qualifying and racing. But, other than cultivating my Sportsmanship Rating and Driver Rating (a second metric tracking our speed and success, basically), I do wonder if there’s enough content in Sport Mode to give it stamina. Right now, it’s just a trio of random races set to rotate through a handful of car classes and a pretty narrow buffet of circuits, although they haven’t changed for a number of days. I don’t know that I’ll want to race the same track several times a day for several days in a row. The lack of content is a real drag. With only 17 total locations and 40 tracks (including reverse tracks), GT Sport has just a quarter of the tracks of its two big rivals this year, which means déjà vu set in pretty fast. Sadly, there are only six real-world tracks in GT Sport (although Polyphony has spread them out across the globe, so North America, South America, Germany, the UK, Japan, and Australia are each represented with one track each). These real-world tracks (Willow Springs, Interlagos, Nürburgring, Brands Hatch, Suzuka, and Bathurst) are the best in GT Sport’s catalog. With no dynamic weather or lighting they don’t feel alive in the same way as the tracks do in F1 2016, Project CARS 2, or even Forza Motorsport 7 – particularly the way the tracks in those three racers become saturated and dry up – but they do boast small, quaint touches like properly animated flag marshals. And the pre-baked time-of-day options look good, too. The remaining 11 fictional locations vary significantly in quality. Dragon Trail has some fun sections and an amazing backdrop; it feels unrealistically wide at times but the extra space helps facilitate slightly cleaner racing. The Tokyo freeway track is at the other end of the spectrum; it looks truly convincing as a stretch of real public road, but it’s super narrow and not particularly conducive to clean racing. It’s strange Polyphony didn’t tap into its past and resurrect series staples like Grand Valley, or Autumn Ring, or Seattle. Three rally tracks are included (six if you count the reverse layouts), but they feel like relics compared to the much better off road and rallycross experiences in Dirt 4 and Project CARS 2. Here in GT Sport it’s still a bit like driving on ice; like I’m skating across the surface. The car list is disappointing, too, especially as the 160-car figure becomes much less impressive under scrutiny. Most of the 33 represented manufacturers have a single model included two to five times, each pre-prepared for several of GT Sport’s racing classes. Sure, they’re technicallydifferent cars – with their own aero parts and performance characteristics – but they certainly don’t do much for variety. The worst offenders are the pretend “road-legal” homologated versions of GT Sport’s race cars. Then there are the Vision GT fantasy models – there are about 30 of those – which, to me, often feel like the automotive equivalent of those weird couture fashion shows where all the models are wearing bath mats, bin bags, and bits of fruit and straw: Too over the top. I know a lot of people like this sort of wild and futuristic stuff, but personally I’ve got no attachment to these things, especially in lieu of real racing cars. They look completely incongruous pitted against normal, modern LMP1 cars, too. Their presence only serves to highlight big holes in the lineup. I mean, where’s the retro stuff? The vintage open-wheelers or classic prototypes? Group A, Group C, Group 5, or GT1? GT Sport’s main competitors this year have all these classes, and more. Hell, its own intro movie is dedicated to gazing back at these past icons and yet, with one exception, the oldest car in GT Sport is from 2009. That exception is a lone 1987 Quattro, which sticks out like a polar bear at a penguin bar mitzvah as the single retro ride in the whole collection. The retort here is usually something about quality over quantity but, even though the level of detail in GT Sport’s vehicles is astonishing, it’s not as if the cars the competition is producing are sketched in crayon. Polyphony has added a good livery editor to create authentic-looking race cars, but the traditional part-replacement system has been ditched for a more superficial upgrade bar. This feels like a particularly strange shift for GT to make after 20 years but, considering online racing is the key focus here and Sport Mode applies Balance of Performance to all cars participating anyway, the old upgrade system would have been largely undermined. Still, I suspect it’s going to be hard for some people to reconcile these sorts of changes with GT Sport’s more idiosyncratic indulgences. Like, we couldn’t get a single returning original GT track, but we did get a special showroom for a watch manufacturer. Yes, it harms no-one, and I know TAG has a firm association with motor racing, but it’s a weird thing to prioritise when, say, player flag icons are still determined by the nationality of one’s PSN account and not one’s actual nationality. Same goes for the oddball slideshow that allows us to sync up key moments in car culture with a real scattergun spray of world events, like the election of Stalin and the release of Björk’s first solo album. Gran Turismo Sport bundle comes with a real customized 2018 Mazda MX-5 Miata, 4K TVhttps://www.4wheelsnews.com/gaming/gran-turismo-sport-mazda-mx-5-miata-4k-tv-bundle-38211.html
×