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  1. We thought things like this only happens in the movies but as it turns out, there are people doing this in real life as well! As seen on a Facebook post by SG Road Vigilante, the owner of this red 7-seater BMW 216D Grand Tourer wrote in to the page claiming that another BMW 2 Series in a similar shade of red has been using their number plate, chalking up fines they were not responsible for. However, this red 2 Series is a 5-seater variant that is called the Active Tourer and it looks largely similar as you can see from the screenshots taken from BMW Singapore's website. Reproduced below is an extract from the rightful owner of the plate SGX821M that was in SGRV's post. Hi, I was notified that you posted a video back in July on a speeding car with my license plate #SGX821M. I would like to highlight that THAT is not my car. Someone is impersonating us using our license plate. I drive a 7 seater BMW 2 series while the car in the video was a 5 seater 2 series. We were issued fines that we are not responsible for. AND my husband literally drove past the idiot this morning bearing our license plate while we were dropping our kids off to school. We couldn’t give chase because we were on opposite sides of the road. I have lodged a police report and have notified the LTA. We are awaiting investigations. If you happen to see the car, please help update the police on its whereabouts. Check out the video of the imposter who was also featured on SGRV before.
  2. Miw scared another donald saga appears on our shores. So if i post comments like, caught radx cross dressing, will i be prosecuted
  3. https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/pictures/bad-car-design-trends-2018/ my top 3: - Fake vents & air scoops - Fake exhaust tips, in which u can clearly see the actual ugly+cheap ones - Coupeovers
  4. One website that really deserves to be banned is STR!! They are partly responsible for instilling fear amongst Singaporeans during DORSCON Orange asking Singaporeans to stock up at least 6 months worth of food and essentials in one of their Facebook posts. . The owner of the website Alex is now hiding in Australia.. . Is there no way the Government can shutdown the website? Singaporeans need to unite during this period. Hit back at the Pap during elections if you are unsatisfied with the government but this is the time to be united and not divided.. . Certainly don't need a website like STR to stir shit.... Some ppl jus wanna watch the world burn... https://www.straitstimes.com/politics/coronavirus-govt-invokes-fake-news-law-against-false-claims-by-states-times-review?utm_medium=Social&utm_campaign=STFB&utm_source=Facebook#Echobox=1581692638 SINGAPORE - The States Times Review (STR) Facebook page was on Friday (Feb 14) ordered under the fake news law to put up corrections alongside false statements it made about the coronavirus outbreak. This is the second order issued against STR under the Protection from Online Falsehood and Manipulation Act (Pofma) for bogus claims about the coronavirus crisis. STR had earlier falsely claimed that Singapore ran out of face masks. To date, the law has been used to deal with four cases of falsehoods related to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease, known as Covid-19. On Friday, Health Minister Gan Kim Yong instructed the Pofma Office to issue corrections against "multiple false statements" in a post that STR put up the day before. The post, which was about the 30,000 Chinese work pass holders who have not returned to Singapore, was shared more than 300 times. Among the erroneous claims were that Singapore had not been able to trace the source of infection for any of the infected Covid-19 cases here. The Government described the claims made by STR as "entirely false", and rebutted them point by point in a statement on its fact-checking website, Factually. On the source of infections, the statement said the Ministry of Health (MOH) had in fact established through epidemiological investigations and contact tracing that 51 out of the 58 people infected with the virus either had travelled to China or come from there, or had links to previously announced cases. Contact tracing is under way for the remaining seven locally transmitted cases, to see if there are similar links or travel history to China. The STR had also said the Government is "the only one" telling people not to wear masks. This is not true, as the MOH's advice is in line with the World Health Organisation's guidance, and similar to advice given by health authorities in countries such as the United States and Australia, said the government statement. MOH's advice is that there is no need for people who are well to wear a mask, but those with respiratory symptoms should don one to minimise the risk of infecting others. STR made two other false claims about the daily $100 allowance for workers on a leave of absence, and Manpower Minister Josephine Teo's remarks about Chinese workers. Rebutting the claims, the Government said Chinese work pass holders placed on a mandatory 14-day leave of absence "do not receive the $100 daily support". Though the Leave of Absence Support Programme covers all workers, regardless of nationality, it is employers that receive the support, it added. These employers must have workers who travelled to China on or before Jan 31 this year, and who were placed on leave of absence after returning to Singapore on or after Jan 31. The Government also made clear that Mrs Teo never said she was working hard to bring more Chinese workers back to Singapore. On the contrary, the Manpower Ministry (MOM) has put in measures to slow down the return of affected work pass holders, like requiring employers to get prior approval before their workers can return, said the statement. It has also rejected more applications than it has approved. The STR had also said seven countries have since banned travel to Singapore due to lack of confidence in the measures taken so far to curb the spread of the virus. But as of 8pm on Thursday, there have been no such bans by any countries, said the Government. The STR Facebook page is run by Singaporean Alex Tan, who has received three Pofma orders so far since the laws against misinformation kicked in last October. He has not complied with any of the orders, and said he is now an Australian citizen. Besides issuing a correction order to Mr Tan, the Pofma Office also issued a Targeted Correction Direction to Facebook on Friday, requiring the social media company to put up the corrections on the STR post. The office had done the same in previous Pofma cases involving STR. The Government also advised people to get the latest updates on the Covid-19 situation from official sources such as the MOH website and Gov.sg WhatsApp service, and to report any suspected falsehoods to info@pofmaoffice.gov.sg.
  5. Wind30

    Income inequality

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/income-inequality-gini-household-singapore-lowest-2019-12453450 can u spot the “fake” news by our government? How much did our median income increase by?
  6. StreetFight3r

    Fake sg passports so ez to get?

    He peddles all sorts of forged papers on the black market, but the bright red Singapore passport - one of the most powerful travel document in the world - is among his hot sellers. The seller on the Dark Web claims the fake documents are as good as state-issued ones, adding that the authorities will not be able to tell the difference. In fact, the passport dealer, who also sells forged identity cards and driver licences, is so confident of his fake travel papers that he promises a refund if his customers run into problems. The forged papers "are 100 per cent registered into the database system, so you will never have a problem using them" or passing through security checks, he told The Sunday Times via e-mail. In the cyber underworld, peddlers are offering forged Singapore passports for sale. Although the sellers also offer other passports, the Singapore one is a premium item because it allows the holder visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 189 destinations. On the online black market, the forged Singapore passport is offered at $3,800, with photographs and biodata substituted from the originals. For an extra $100, the passport can be ready within days and shipped anywhere in the world. A fake Singapore identity card costs about $1,000. Other documents such as driving licences, work permits and university degrees are also available, and items are bought using bitcoin, a digital currency favoured for its secrecy. The United States passport, which costs about $4,300 on the Dark Web and gives visa-free access to 184 destinations, is another hot item. But one seller, who bragged about his links to immigration authorities and diplomats, cautioned: "There are people who (pass through checks) with my passports and other documents, but do your own research and do it at your own risk." Unlike counterfeits which involve recreating a document, forged passports and identity cards are often genuine items that have been tampered with. And many are the result of documents that have gone missing, experts say. In Singapore, it was previously revealed in Parliament that in the five years to 2014, about 7,000 passports belonging to the Republic were reported lost or stolen every year. In that same period, about 1,700 travellers were caught with forged or tampered passports at Singapore checkpoints. The problem of forged travel documents persists. Last year, Pakistani national Mohammed Iqbal, 52, was nabbed in Bangkok with three fake Singapore passports and a fake Indian one. He also had plates and laminates used to forge entry visas to France, Italy and Spain. The problem is significant enough for Interpol to set up a database with more than 84 million records of lost, stolen and revoked travel documents - including passports, visas and identity cards.
  7. Zxcvb

    Fake Taxi

    Hi guys, recently saw a lot of cars putting up the "fake taxi" decal. Even PHV vehicles also put up the stickers, think the drivers want their fantasies to come true. What do you think??
  8. Volvobrick

    Fake Ferrari and Lambo

    And we thought only in China, but in Brazil too! (I am referring to clever builders) Maybe if they had replace the "bo" in Lamborghini with "pa" they would not be arrested. https://www.scmp.com/news/world/americas/article/3018907/busted-inside-fake-ferrari-factory-sold-shamborghinis-us45000 Busted: inside the fake Ferrari factory that sold ‘Shamborghinis’ for US$45,000Police said the cars were being offered on social media for a small fraction of the price of the real thing Associated Press Published: 9:13am, 17 Jul, 2019 3 Brazilian police dismantled the clandestine workshop run by a father and son who assembled fake Ferraris and Lamborghinis to order. Photo: AP Brazilian police say they have shut down a clandestine factory that was producing fake Ferraris and sham Lamborghinis. A father and son who owned the workshop in the southern state of Santa Catarina have been arrested on industrial property charges. Car moulds of luxury car replicas at the workshop. Photo: AFP Share: Police said the cars were being offered on social media for US$45,000 to US$60,000 – a small fraction of the price of the real thing. The clandestine workshop was run by a father and son who assembled fake Ferraris and Lamborghinis to order. Photo: AP Share: Officials did not say what sort of parts were used to build the vehicles, but they distributed photos showing sleek bodies, as well as badges and accessories emblazoned with the Italian brands. The seat of a car embroidered with a fake Lamborghini logo. Photo: AP
  9. Proof here: http://themillenniumreport.com/2014/07/a-stereoscopic-method-of-verifying-apollo-lunar-surface-images/
  10. Mustank

    Fake Degree School Boss run road

    http://www.asiaone.com/News/Education/Stor...717-155267.html if his students find him, i hope the students will not chong tong
  11. Wahahaha......same same but different? https://mothership.sg/2019/02/malaysia-marzuki-yahya-cambridge-university/
  12. Hamburger

    Fake MC

    what is the repercussion of producing fake MC and the legal implications that it would lead to. Thanks for the heads up in advance.
  13. http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=0-JULFxB0sk http://www.japanprobe.com/?p=1678
  14. When you think nothing could be worse than adding melamine to milk ? --------- China: Hundreds of thousands of children given fake vaccines Executives from China's second-largest pharmaceutical company, Changsheng Bio-Technology Company, have admitted to falsifying test results and producing fake vaccines. Hundreds of thousands of children in China may have been given fabricated vaccines produced by China's second-largest pharmaceutical company. Health regulators found that the drug maker violated safety standards. It is the second scandal to hit the company in the past week. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpmRMOX8Ezs
  15. http://www.asiaone.com/singapore/after-spate-one-star-reviews-sgsecure-app-suddenly-getting-awesome-five-star-reviews?xtor=CS3-61 Counter productive or counter terrorism ? It seems like national servicemen are still being made to download the SGSecure mobile application. The app was first launched in 2016 by the Ministry of Home Affairs to teach users about counter-terrorism and send alerts of major emergencies and terror incidents. It made the news in July 2017, after suffering a spate of one-star reviews. It turned out the reviewers were national servicemen "forced" by their superiors to download the app, and allegedly faced punishment if they did not. We are reluctant to say "forced", since the Ministry of Defence's explanation that soldiers should have the app downloaded on their phones made sense to us. The app has since racked up more than 100,000 downloads, but more interestingly, the 1.5-star rating back then has improved to 2.6. The number of five-star reviews, at over 400, is slowly catching up to the 600-plus one-star reviews. In the last couple of days, wordy, 'heartfelt' reviews have appeared, indicating another round of backlash towards being ordered to download the app. The strategy seems to have changed, from angry reviews to sarcastic ones.
  16. Sdf4786k

    Fake summons

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/parking-officer-issued-fake-summonses-jailed-10829328 Twang also twang smart lah .. anyhow issue sure kanna one
  17. https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/cnainsider/army-fake-reviews-online-taobao-amazon-tripadvisor-sales-10448454 marketing strategy or a scam? i dont mind getting paid $1,600 a month just from writing them though... usually before buying stuff on taobao/ezbuy i'll read through the reviews first. esp in the case of ezbuy, it's easy to spot real from fake reviews. usually genuine ones will have actual product photos. and i would prefer to read reviews weighing both the pros and cons. if company A has 20 good reviews, it may just look dubious. but in any case, take any reviews with a pinch of salt. especially items from taobao. one man's meat may be another man's poison. it's the same for bloggers/influencer. they are paid to advertise and endorse products from their sponsors, if not how are they going to earn? though there are genuine ones out there. you usually see the new "influencers" or the less popular ones being more eager to say niceties about their sponsors. those are the ones you should avoid.
  18. Ahtong

    Fake accident but epic fail

    Not only did the car have a recorder, the driver is a cop
  19. Johny_walker

    Bogus car plate

    http://forums.hardwarezone.com.sg/cars-cars-204/drivers-beware-someone-could-using-your-car-licence-plate-2682654.html
  20. Hi guys, just a few sites for your reference with regards to fake ICE stuff.. this one is with reference to fake focals in our neighbours up north.. http://www.focal-fr.com/counterfeit.htm http://www.focal-fr.com/COUNTERFEITING/malaysia.htm
  21. We all know Santa Claus is not real but we all want to believe in him. Trump is the real president of America but those in America do not want to believe it. Any other true or fake news? http://www.straitstimes.com/world/united-states/ho-ho-hoax-story-of-terminally-ill-american-boy-dying-in-santas-arms-may-not-be KNOXVILLE, Tennessee - In the spirit of Christmas, Santa Claus himself might have just hopped on the fake news trend that has been taking the world by storm. Knoxville News Sentinel, part of the USA Today network, had reported about an incident in a local hospital, where a terminally ill five-year-old boy died in the arms of Santa Claus actor Eric Schmitt-Matzen a few weeks ago. The story went viral, and was picked up by major news networks. However on Wednesday (Dec 14), the paper published a note from editor Jack McElroy and the author of the original story, columnist Sam Venable, saying they have been unable to verify the story as accurate. "Since publication, the News Sentinel has done additional investigation in an attempt to independently verify Schmitt-Matzen's account. This has proven unsuccessful. Although facts about his background have checked out, his story of bringing a gift to a dying child remains unverified," said Mr McElroy and Mr Venable in the note. "Therefore, because the story does not meet the newspaper's standards of verification, we are no longer standing by the veracity of Schmitt-Matzen's account." The paper had reported the story on Sunday (Dec 11), after contacting and interviewing Mr Schmitt-Matzen, who has been playing Santa Claus for years at the local hospital, following a tip off by a "known source". He said a nurse had called him about the five-year-old's request to see Santa Claus, and that there was no time for him to change into his full costume. At the hospital, he gave the boy a toy and told him right before he died: "When you get there, you tell them you're Santa's No. 1 elf and I know they'll let you in." After the incident, he was so affected he said he thought he would never be able to play the role of Santa again. The Knoxville News Sentinel said that the 60-year-old wanted to protect the identities of the child's family and the nurse who called him. In follow-up interviews and video recordings by local and national television outlets, the 1.8m tall and 141kg Mr Schmitt-Matzen, president of Packing Seals & Engineering in Jacksboro, Tennessee, has stood by his account. pzeric12e_2x.jpg Related Story Terminally ill little boy dies in Santa's arms collage191116.jpg Related Story Can you tell the fake news stories from the real ones? Take our quiz vikram_3.jpg Related Story How to fight back against the scourge of fake news The note has been met with mixed views on the newspaper's Facebook post. Some believed in the legitimacy of the story, and gave Mr Schmitt-Matzen the benefit of the doubt. Facebook user Lynn Taylor Morgan commented: "I am disgusted. The family shouldn't have to come forward to verify this story. It's true. Period." However, there were also those who were wary, especially given the spread of fake news on the internet. Facebook user Jean Ash said: "I would hope the purported Santa or child's family would come forth. Otherwise, we must acknowledge a possible hoax. What a shame." TOPICS: CHRISTMAS CHILDREN AND YOUTH
  22. Kb27

    Fake jellyfish scam

    Chinese police uncover huge fake jellyfish 'scam' http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-36253779
  23. Jman888

    Thai-Land of faking

    after plastic surgery, you need a new ID to be convincing
  24. Tanahseng

    Fake Monk encountered

    This is not new in Singapore. but last night I encountered this "monk" at Club street, he is not those Thailand or Myanmar monk. Is those Chinses Shao Lin Shi type, holding a stick and a bowl full of notes. I know monks will not ask for money, but both my friends offer him $2 each. Anyone encounter this monk at the mentioned area? Please share!
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