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  1. https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/hdb-flats-housing-grant-income-ceilings-higher-11891818 Bto income ceiling increased to 14k. EC up to 16k. Increased grants depending on income levels. 👍
  2. KiaCeratoHB

    Sell Private & Buy HDB & Private?

    Guys, I cant seem to get a definite answer on this. I'm planning to sell my existing place n move nearer to my kids' school. A friend is saying I should take the opportunity to get a HDB resale; as in my wife buy a resale HDB and I buy the condo but each of us has to finance each property individually. Is this allowed?
  3. Is the HDB housing loan a reducing balance loan? If so, how is the monthly instalment amount calculated? I understand that if the monthly instalment is X, then X = Y+Z where Y goes toward principal and Z toward interest. Over time, X remains constant but Y and Z will change. How is X determined? How are the proportions of Y and Z determined? attached: example using CPF website calculator
  4. pegasi

    New VERS scheme for aging HDB

    NDR 2018: Scheme planned to redevelop more old HDB flats before leases end source: https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/ndr-2018-scheme-planned-to-redevelop-more-old-hdb-flats-before-10631458
  5. For all new home buyers / multiple home buyers out there !!! Property agents' records go online: What to look for when searching for one The CEA Public Register will now display details of completed HDB resale transactions when you search for a property agent. This includes information on the transaction dates, the location of the flat, and who the agent represented (buyer or seller). 3 main things to look out for 1. How active the property agent has been 2. The type of housing the property agent specialises in 3. The property agent’s neighbourhood of choice https://cnalifestyle.channelnewsasia.com/trending/how-to-use-property-agents-online-records-11140502 https://www.cea.gov.sg/public-register
  6. http://theindependent.sg/ho-ching-wants-everyone-to-own-a-hdb-flat/ https://www.propertyguru.com.sg/property-management-news/2019/10/183865/remove-income-ceiling-for-first-time-hdb-buyers-ho-ching Maybe she can start to lead by example to stay in HDB?
  7. what was your deciding factor when you chose your HDB flat in your block ? not talking about location as in road, but how you made your choices on the level and either corner or center of beside lift or staircase ? all this - if you had a choice during your selection ? I would hope to get a corner flat so only the door is the only accessible point of entry. so that I can keep my hall or room windows opened all the time without worry of my neighbors/stalkers walking past my unit and looking inside.
  8. I did not know HDB parking rules are so strict https://www.hdb.gov.sg/cs/infoweb/car-parks/parking-offences/parking-rules-and-penalties: Repairing/ allowing repairs to a motor vehicle in a parking place. ($80 fine) No one is allowed to jump start a car and change to a new car battery. Using a motor vehicle within a parking place for sale or promoting the sale of goods of any kind. ($80 fine) Property agents or taxis with advertisement stickers should beware. Cause/ allow vehicle to be washed in a parking place. ($80) Anyone who engages foreign workers to wash their car at night will have to stop doing that. But I still have not figured out why vans and lorries are allowed to park at loading/unloading bay as long as they want while seasoned parking car owners cannot
  9. Wanted to change the current window casement unit into a split aircon for my flat utilities room... but aircon man says cannot hack pre-cast space adding item wall.... WTH.. then how to run wire into that room? DUH! I checked with HDB also say the same thing..... but hor I saw my neighbour unit some shifted the whole kitchen into that little room... don't tell me no piping needed ? some also already got split aircon in that little room... cannot drill a hole meh? (not hacking lei)
  10. dear bros here. i need some help for my mum's old HDB 4 room flat. existing: spoilt casement aircon in 1 room that is rented out *planning to install system 2 aircon for the 2 other rooms. any recommendations for aircon brands/models?* Criteria will be: not too expensive. is it possible for system 2 to be below $2000? low energy consumption. reliable. as the house doesn't come with any existing aircon except the casement aircon may i know an estimate of the labor cost to fit in a system 2?
  11. City100a

    HDB Home loan rates

    I always though that HDB loans awere heavily subsized that it is almost like lelong but then how come HLF can offer heartlanders cheaper loans I think we need an explanation from HBD as to why HLF stirs waters, cuts HDB home loan rates By SIOW LI SEN Hong Leong Finance (HLF) has slashed its HDB home loan rates in a bid to undercut the competition amid a low interest rate environment, but it seems some banks might have been even quicker on the draw. Related stories:
  12. Hi, anyone knows if my son who is one of the named occupier for a 3G unit is still eligible to apply a BTO for his own family after a certain period of years? We are due to attend and select a unit this friday 26 April. need an answer b4 we decide whether if we still want to proceed to take up a 3G or not. TIA
  13. Hey guys. I need to apply family season parking to park at my dads hdb carpark. Has anyone done it before? First time applicants for family season parking need to go down to hdb branch office. I know need documentary proof. But Is my birth certificate enough? Do I need my dad's ic? Any branch office is OK? Or do I need to go down to like his estates branch office. I need to do it tomorrow and the hdb hotline is closed already at 5pm.
  14. Neighbours may exchange greetings and make small talk, but that's as far as many Singaporeans go. Displays of trust, such as looking after house keys or lending and borrowing items, are seldom heard of in Housing Board estates. Residents' interactions also tend to be "incidental and minimal", according to study findings released by the HDB and the National University of Singapore Centre of Sustainable Asian Cities and Sociology department. These findings, however, do not surprise experts. "The more densely packed we are, the more we value privacy," said sociologist Paulin Straughan. "Modern society prides itself on being independent. As a result, we don't make the additional effort to reach out to our neighbours. Unlike the olden days in a kampung, when neighbours needed each other to borrow rice, for instance. "Combined with the work stress that comes with urban living, when you retreat to the sanctity of your own home, you want it to be your own private sphere. Many of us put up a sub-conscious barrier and it becomes a norm." Associate Professor Straughan added that such behaviour is prevalent in cosmopolitan and urban cities. In a bid to find out how design and amenities have contributed to interaction among residents, the year-long study surveyed about 2,200 residents in five HDB towns. Respondents were asked to score their frequency of interactions with neighbours, from a score of one (never) to five (daily). Overall, they ranked "exchange of greetings/ small talk" as the most frequent activity, with a mean score of 3.47. Safekeeping of house keys and borrowing and lending household items ranked the lowest at 1.11 and 1.25 respectively. MP for Pasir Ris-Punggol GRC Gan Thiam Poh said that he has noticed this lack of neighbourliness in the less mature estates, where neighbours have spent less time together: "To my surprise, I have met residents who don't even know their next-door neighbours." Ms Ellen Lee, MP for Sembawang GRC, said that while most residents are on cordial terms, few are extremely close. But she added that there are the "rare gems" who have potluck parties together, take care of one another's children and collect their neighbours' newspapers or water their plants when they are travelling. Mr Gan attended a recent wake where he learnt of a Hougang resident who had bought breakfast for her sickly neighbour every day before the latter died. "She didn't even ask to be paid back. It was very heartwarming - I think such a good kampung spirit should be encouraged," he said. Sales promoter Soon Kam Mee, who lives in a four-room flat in Bishan, said she is close to her neighbour on the 18th floor, partly because their children went to the same kindergarten and primary school. The two buy each other souvenirs when they travel. But the 56-year-old does not interact much with her immediate neighbours on the eighth storey, as they are "either very busy with work or seldom at home". In order to improve bonding between residents, the HDB plans to explore ideas yielded from the study, which involved six focus group discussions with residents. One includes turning public walkways through housing estates into "social linkways" by adding seats or exhibits to encourage people to linger when they meet a neighbour. Another is a one-stop hub for community activities, or a "neighbourhood incubator". The two initiatives will be piloted in Tampines Central from this month until May next year. If successful, they will be adopted at the new Bidadari and Tampines North estates. Prof Straughan believes infrastructure can play a big part in fostering cohesiveness. "If you allow common congregation spots where people can do things together, it will help," she said. "But at the end of the day... it's hard to change human behaviour patterns, so it can't be a short-term effort." Source: http://www.straitstimes.com/news/singapore/more-singapore-stories/story/most-neighbours-just-say-hi-and-bye-20140608
  15. Albeniz

    Sound-proofing a HDB room?

    I was shopping around for a resale HDB housing and came across a flat which was quite ideal except for its close proximity to an MRT rail-line. I am wondering if it is possible to sound-proof a bedroom so that the passing train would not disturb my sleep. How much would it typically cost and is it effective? Would appreciate if you could share your experience.
  16. was at SAFRA Toa Payoh couple of days ago and looking at the old photos on the wall. Chanced upon this photo that i realised the old NSmen actually had pirorities for HDB flats.... Then why this privilege was taken away for the later (present) generation? I rem in one of the suggestions posted by angry citizens calling for NSmen to be given pirorty for HDB flat selection. This is nothing new!! They did had this scheme before in 1974, and taken away for whatever reason!!!!
  17. Inlinefour

    Peacock at HDB

    Christmas coming Turkey to be replaced by peacock liao Rare sighting at hdb block
  18. By now the famous quote by our million dollar minister: https://mothership.sg/2016/10/josephine-teo-said-you-dont-need-a-flat-before-making-babies-sporeans-disagree-vehemently/ This guy's disrupted grieving is a testament of how true the statement is.... Sexy time moaning from 2nd floor flat interrupts guy mourning & burying dead pet cat at Bukit Batok HDB estateFrom mourning to moaning. https://mothership.sg/2018/12/guy-burying-cat-interrupted-moaning/ *disclaimer: chill you prudes.....this is just a light hearted thread.
  19. Karoon

    treadmill in hdb flat

    Thinking of buying a motorised one for my flat but will the pounding affect the neighbour downstairs? Any bros with experience? Dont want to end up with exercise machine you can only use when neighbours are away.
  20. This was brought up a few days ago, in the "President" 's policy suggestions... Instead of stopping people using their CPF to pay for their mortgages, why not reduce the prices if HDB flats and not peg them to market prices with land prices? Then Singaporeans will have more money to save with lower HDB flats prices. What Would Happen if You Couldn't Use Your CPF Savings to Buy a Home? https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/happen-couldn-apos-t-cpf-213202807.html In response to President Halimah's call for policy suggestions, economist Walter Theseira suggested disallowing the use of CPF savings for home purchases. The measure was proposed in order to address inadequate retirement saving. This could be a logical concern, as putting a significant amount of one's retirement into home may leave them with too few remaining assets to retire comfortably, especially given the uncertainties around the 99-year HDB lease. This proposal would likely have a massive impact on the housing market—over the past decade, around S$82 billion was withdrawn from CPF accounts in order to purchase HDB flats. Given the scale of this proposal, it is worth asking: how would homeowners and prospective homebuyers be affected? How Does The Current System Work? Currently, the Public Housing Scheme (PHS) allows individuals to use their CPF Ordinary Account to pay for a part of their HDB flat purchase. However, homebuyers are limited in the amount that they can withdraw from their CPF savings for the purchase of a HDB lease. Limits are based on the number of years remaining in the lease at the time it is purchased. How Would This Proposal Affect the Real Estate Market? In the short-term, we expect that housing prices would drop as result of proposed rule. The rule will likely prevent many prospective homeowners from being able to afford to purchase homes, as they would have significantly less money to contribute to the purchase. The decreased ability to buy a property should lead to a decline in market demand, which should in turn cause a decrease home prices. For example, we can approximate the scale of change with some basic calculations. In 2017, $7.4 billion was withdrawn for the purpose of purchasing new and resale HDB flats. There were 22,077 resale applications and approximately 17,500 new units in 2017. Assuming average resale values of S$450,000 and average BTO prices of S$310,000, the S$7.4 billion withdrawn in 2017 represents about half (48%) of the total HDB market transactions (S$15.4 billion). Although these are rough estimates, roughly 20% of this might be supporting the actual home value, while the other 30% is being used to pay interest on home loans. In the long run, it seems reasonable to expect that HDB prices could drop by 10-20% as developers acquiesce to consumers' reduced purchasing power while prospective buyers take longer to build enough savings to buy a flat. Good News for Prospective Home Buyers? Overall, this proposal appears that it would be a net-neutral event for prospective home buyers. On one hand, these individuals may have to save longer in order to purchase a home since they will not be able to access their CPF savings. On the other hand, a drop in housing prices could offset their reduced ability to purchase homes. Additionally, these individuals will benefit from having additional retirement savings since their CPF will be able to compound untouched over a long period of time. Bad News for Existing Homeowners However, this proposal definitely could have a negative impact for current property owners. If all buyers in the market are less able to afford current real estate prices, the market forces tend to adjust the prices lower until people can afford flats without the help of their CPF accounts. This would ultimately mean a reduction of wealth for those who already own HDB flats. Additionally, current homeowners may face another negative consequence. Currently, individuals re-selling their HDB flats must refund their CPF account based the principal amount withdrawn for their HDB flat purchase, as well as the amount of accrued interest that the savings would have earned if they had not withdrawn from the CPF account initially. If property values drop significantly, these homeowners will have much more difficult time meeting this refund requirement. How to Make a Smooth Transition The proposal would certainly incentivize increased personal savings and promote wealthier retirement, which could be a financially responsible goal. In order to make this transition easier, however, there are a few concepts to consider. First, because existing homeowners must refund their CPF account based on the amount withdrawn for purchasing a home, declining home prices could put them at significant financial risk. One way to make the proposed rule more palatable would be to decrease the refund requirements for current homeowners. Additionally, if HDB leases were extended, policy makers might be able to both buoy short-term home prices as well as mend a long-term structural issue related to HDBs. It could also help the owners of older flats, whose retirement savings could benefit from increased resale value if leases were easily extended beyond 99 years. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The truth behind proposal to prevent CPF for housing https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/truth-behind-proposal-prevent-cpf-065043359.html An academic’s suggestion which seemed to propose that the Central Provident Fund (CPF) monies no longer be allowed to be used to buy residential properties, has in recent days stirred the hornet’s nest. Walter Theseira, professor of Economics at UniSIM, made that suggestion in responding to President Halimah’s call for policy suggestions. Prof Dr Theseira said that the use of CPF savings for housing should be curbed in a bid to prevent the people from over-investing their savings on housing. He noted that people typically over-invest on housing as a way of “unlocking their CPF funds” and that installing measures to limit the use of CPF monies for housing could help the people conserve their savings for retirement and health. He said: “My view is that the CPF system tries to do a little too much, and we should consider focusing CPF on retirement and health…I do believe there is some over-investment in housing, which creates retirement risks if housing values do not grow, and this over-investment is because Singaporeans see housing as a way of unlocking their CPF funds.” One such measure the authorities could instate is slashing CPF contribution rates, Theseira suggested. This would mean that workers would receive more take-home pay that they could allocate to housing. “A CPF system focused on retirement and health would require lower contribution rates, and allow people more choices in using their higher take-home income on housing, investments, business, and family.” While Theseira advocated for a redesign of the CPF system “so that people no longer need to pay for housing out of CPF, by cutting contribution rates to focus on retirement and health,” he added that he is unsure what the right contribution rate should be. His views on the redesign of the CPF system drew sharp criticisms from the members of the public. Some were initially even confused that it was President Halimah who had made that suggestion in her call that there were ‘no sacred cows’. After the public uproar, the professor took to his Facebook to clarify that he did not argue for CPF to be removed completely or even for the housing component of CPF to be removed completely – since it may help people save for their first home. Theseira said: “What the right contribution rate should be, I cannot say. Perhaps some housing component remains important to help people save for their first home. Nor would I argue to remove CPF, because mandating retirement savings remains important, even for (especially for?) people who believe they can do a better job on their own. But this is a topic for another day.” Elaborating, the economist asked: “What choices would we make if a different policy was in place? What trade-offs would we accept if we designed policy? It’s easy to make fun of policymakers, and it’s also easy to critique policy. Finding workable solutions that promote the public interest is a lot harder, but more than ever, we need to work together to help improve policy in Singapore.” Prominent commentator on economic policies, Chris Kuan, said that Theseira’s views on CPF usage are generally sound. Kuan explained: “This bring Singapore back to normality in terms of what social security is used for and will go a long way to minimise the large trade-off between paying for housing and saving for retirement and healthcare. It will also reduce the known tendency of Singaporeans of over-extending housing affordability and hence driving up prices because of the instant gratification they received over CPF being released to pay for property when that gratification can only otherwise be realised decades into the future.” Kuan added that the trade-off between CPF being used for housing and retirement is a complex one, to which there are no easy answers. “There is always that easy argument that the whole problem of the trade-off between housing and retirement is due to HDB affordability and that tiresome mantra that all it takes is just make HDB affordable. Well, making HDB affordable from this point forward is the easy part. The difficult part is how to make HDB affordable without destroying the housing equity and hence retirement proposition of current HDB owners. That is the intractable part of the problem.” “I always held that the huge increase in CPF assets due to the high contribution rates are too much of a temptation for the government,” Kuan, a former international banker, said. Adding: “What better way to use it up than let public housing prices rise – it increases the government reserves which is essentially a very large transfer of wealth from households to the state and slow down the accumulation of government indebtedness.” Although highly unlikely, if Theseira’s proposal was accepted by the Government, it would mean that housing prices will drop drastically. This is because without CPF, many home buyers will be deterred by the large out-of-pocket down-payment that they would have to pay for their prospective homes. This would in turn lead to a decline in demand in the residential property market, driving down prices significantly. A scenario which would be prevented from happening at all costs by policymakers who have vested interests in a healthy real estate market. ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ What the forefathers has given Singaporeans the flexibility to buy homes with their CPF money in the past, and now these people are thinking of removing this scheme? https://www.cpf.gov.sg/Members/AboutUs/about-us-info/history-of-cpf The evolution of CPF a) CPF and housing – the twin pillars of retirement adequacy To help workers save for retirement, the CPF was established on 1 July 1955. Workers contributed part of their monthly income to their CPF to build up their retirement savings. In 1968, the government introduced the Public Housing Scheme, allowing Singaporeans to pay for the mortgages of their HDB flats using their CPF savings instead of having to use their take-home pay. This increased the affordability of housing and provided many Singaporeans with a home. Home ownership became a key pillar of retirement security as it relieves Singaporeans from having to pay rental fees out of their retirement funds during their senior years.
  21. https://mothership.sg/2018/05/married-couple-divorced-buy-hdb-flat-as-single/?nlarticleid=11561273 Husband and wife agree to a divorce of convenience A husband and wife in Singapore had apparently agreed to divorce — just so that they can each own a HDB flat. This was after they figured marriage is just a status, and by divorcing, they can unlock their Central Provident Fund monies in a different way. Wife bought another flat under singles scheme The couple originally bought a HDB flat together when they got married. It was paid for using the husband’s CPF. The husband is now a cab driver. He is likely to be 54 this year, or somewhere in his mid-fifties. He claims he cannot withdraw his CPF money by next year because it does not meet the Minimum Sum, or Retirement Sum, which is the minimum amount of money needed in your CPF account when you turn 55 before withdrawals can be made. The wife too will not be able to withdraw any CPF money in a few years’ time, since she also does not meet the minimum sum. The plan Husband and wife then divorced. On paper. But they are obviously still very much together. This frees up the wife to buy a HDB flat of her own as a single under the Single Singapore Citizen (SSC) scheme. She is able to get a housing grant for the flat as a second-timer single Singapore citizen applicant. She can pay for it with her CPF — which otherwise would be locked in once she turns 55. The man now owns the first flat as a single. Rental income Since he has lived in the house for longer than the five-year Minimum Occupation Period, he is able to rent it out. The husband then proceeds to live with his now ex-wife in the new flat, while both enjoy the passive income from the rental of the first matrimonial flat — said to be about $2,500 monthly.
  22. Folks need to seek your advice. Recently, my neighbour from one storey below mine informed me that water from my bathroom floor leaks through their ceiling. Some work might be needed to resolve the issue. As we are staying in old HDB flat, what is the best way to address the issue? 1. Contact HDB and get HDB appointed contractor to do the work. 2. Get an independent contractor to do the repair work. Would there be any subsidy from HDB for the repair work? How should the payment be split? 50-50 with neighbour, or 100% on me? Many thanks.
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