Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hdb'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Cars
    • General Car Discussion
    • Tips and Resources
  • Aftermarket
    • Accessories
    • Performance and Tuning
    • Cosmetics
    • Maintenance & Repairs
    • Detailing
    • Tyres and Rims
    • In-Car-Entertainment
  • Car Brands
    • Japanese Talk
    • Conti Talk
    • Korean Talk
    • American Talk
    • Malaysian Talk
    • China Talk
  • General
    • Motorsports
    • Meetups
    • Complaints
  • Sponsors
    • Products & Services
  • Non-Car Related
    • Lite & EZ
    • Makan Corner
    • Travel & Road Trips
    • Football Channel
    • Property Buzz
    • Investment & Financial Matters
  • MCF Forum Related
    • Official Announcements
    • Feedback & Suggestions
    • FAQ & Help
    • Testing

Blogs

  • MyAutoBlog

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 313 results

  1. https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/courts-crime/teen-17-dies-after-basketball-backboard-structure-falls-on-him-in-bedok?utm_campaign=stfb&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR2fsbOCwLU_mUQJk6v2aokHaTtAusNwuyQc_giBBpHDdAyNKhTHj0ynH-s How did the F this happen?
  2. Source: https://www.straitstimes.com/opinion/forum/forum-windfall-gains-from-selling-flats-should-be-taxed The Straits Times' associate editor Chua Mui Hoong wrote an excellent piece on returning the Housing Board to its original mandate (Returning HDB to its roots of building homes, not short-term assets, June 25). It resonates with the letter I wrote to the Forum in December suggesting that focus be placed on the resale market to address the lottery conundrum in public housing (Focus on resale market to address public housing issues, Dec 21, 2020), as well as the opinions of many other writers on how to address this inequitable phenomenon. As Ms Chua aptly pointed out, windfall gains that go to those who could afford high-priced Build-To-Order flats in the first place defeat the purpose of subsidised public housing. It is therefore pertinent that taxes of some sort be levied on such capital gains. Ms Chua's suggestion of treating such gains (on the sale of all subsidised HDB flats in all locations) as income is a brilliant idea, as this mechanism promises to give precisely the equitable effect that is sought. In the same way that the additional buyer's stamp duty and other property cooling measures were rolled out fairly quickly in various stages, is it not possible to tackle this facet of the lottery effect while the authorities continue to seek and digest public feedback on a new/enhanced public housing model? It is quite unbelievable that the number of HDB resale flats costing more than $1 million has been on the rise, with 87 sold in the first five months of this year.
  3. https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/record-23-flats-non-mature-hdb-estates-sold-over-s800000-first-quarter-2021 Record 23 HDB flats in non-mature estates resold for over S$800,000 in 1Q 2021 The highest was a five-room flat in Punggol, which sold for S$910,000 Prices of resale HDB flats in Choa Chu Kang, Woodlands, Sembawang, Bukit Panjang and Hougang have risen over 10 per cent since before the pandemic Experts predict that a Punggol resale flat could fetch S$1 million flat within the next year or so SINGAPORE — Amid a pandemic property upswing that has already set off concerns about home affordability, the rising prices of resale flats in non-mature estates such as Punggol, Sengkang and Choa Chu Kang have also caught the attention of some industry watchers. In the first quarter, from January to March this year, 23 flats in non-mature Housing and Development Board (HDB) estates transacted for at least S$800,000, a record number of such units sold above that level in a quarter, a recent property report found. This made up nearly 10 per cent of the 245 flats in non-mature estates that have sold above S$800,000 since 1990, achieved in a single quarter. If this trend continues unhindered, analysts told TODAY an HDB resale flat in Punggol could soon fetch S$1 million. Said Ms Christine Sun, senior vice president of research and analytics at realtor OrangeTee & Tie: “Barring further external shocks, an influx of flat supply or cooling measures, we may see more flats inching closer to the S$1 million mark (in non-mature estates) ... at the current rate of price increase.” This milestone had been frequently breached by flats in mature estates, but never in non-mature towns. One transaction in Punggol last month came fairly close. On Tuesday (April 27), a report from Ms Sun’s company noted that a five-room, nine-year-old premium flat in Punggol changed hands for S$910,000 in March. It is a two-storey, 147-sqm HDB loft unit on the top floor of the Treelodge@Punggol project — attributes which are relatively rare in public housing. Since 1990, there have been only 15 flats in non-mature estates that have fetched above S$900,000, four of which occurred between 2019 and 2021, excluding the sale of the Punggol flat in March. When asked why people were willing to splurge on a flat in Punggol, which has been regarded by some as far-flung and inaccessible, Ms Sun said enhancements to the estates and extensive town planning such as the upcoming Punggol Digital District seem to have drawn buyers to the area. “A new university campus, market village, heritage trail, offices, logistic hub and amenities will be established over the next few years. The progressive enhancements have continued to entice buyers to Punggol and Sengkang,” said Ms Sun. Mr Alan Cheong, executive director of research and consultancy at real estate services provider Savills Singapore, added: “These two estates are demographically dominated by younger families, and this youthful vibrancy reinforces the positive view amongst those who are looking for a home.” HIGHER PRICES IN NON-MATURE ESTATES Apart from Punggol, analysts said that the surging trend of HDB resale prices has also been seen in all other non-mature estates. The HDB does not set out a precise criteria on why mature or non-mature estates are categorised as such and the main distinction is the unit price at launch — Build-to-Order (BTO) prices of non-mature estates are lower than mature estates. Resale data for all other non-mature estates reveal a general price increase during the pandemic, with Choa Chu Kang, Woodlands, Sembawang, Bukit Panjang and Hougang recording price growth in double digit percentage terms. The average price of a five-room flat in a non-mature town in the first quarter this year was around 11 per cent higher than in pre-pandemic 2019, according to data compiled by property consultancy Huttons Asia: Bukit Batok — S$532,038, which was 3.8 per cent more than in 2019 Bukit Panjang — S$543,755, which was 13 per cent more than in 2019 Choa Chu Kang — S$486,734, which was 19 per cent more than in 2019 Hougang — S$532,038, which was 3.8 per cent more than in 2019 Jurong East — S$562,734, which was 8.9 per cent more than in 2019 Jurong West — S$481,647, which was 9.4 per cent more than in 2019 Punggol — S$565,589, which was 9.6 per cent more than in 2019 Sembawang — S$456,309, which was 14.4 per cent more than in 2019 Sengkang — S$520,986, which was 7 per cent more than in 2019 Woodlands — S$470,457, which was 16.7 per cent more than in 2019 Yishun — S$520,394, which was 8.9 per cent more than in 2019 Said Huttons Asia’s director of research Lee Sze Teck: “The differentiation between mature and non-mature estates has blurred over the years. As connectivity and amenities improved in non-mature estates, some of the resale flat prices are very close to mature estates.” Based on his firm’s data, Mr Cheong from Savills Singapore pointed out that the resale HDB prices of non-mature estates have outpaced those in mature estates during the course of the pandemic. Comparing March 2021 and December 2019, average resale prices for flats in non-mature estates shot up by 11.9 per cent, while those in mature estates rose by 8.7 per cent. “Generally speaking, resale prices have risen across the board in both mature and non-mature estates. However, prices of resale flats in the non-mature estates rose more versus those from mature ones,” said Mr Cheong. The reasons behind this buoyant price trend for non-mature estates are also similar to those for mature estates — the current low cost of borrowing, pent-up demand after the circuit breaker, as well as optimism about vaccines and a recovering economy, said experts. Many of the buyers could also be downgrading from private property, or want to live close to family living nearby, which is why a location like Punggol and Sengkang could be popular, they added. Predicting a further 10 per cent increase in resale HDB prices by the end of 2021, Mr Cheong added: “The delays in the construction of Build-to-Order flats made some switch over to the resale market. Another reason is that Singaporeans who lost their jobs overseas are returning and are looking for an affordable home to move into quickly.” Based on HDB data, around 25,530 flats will be reaching their five-year minimum occupation period (MOP) this year, an increase from the 24,163 units in 2020. HDB flats may be sold on the open market only after its occupants have lived in the flat for this period of five years. A large portion will be in non-mature estates. Yishun, Sengkang and Choa Chu Kang, as well as the mature estate of Kallang are the towns that have the highest number of flats reaching their MOPs in 2021. Another 31,325 units will reach their MOP in 2022. Mr Lee from Huttons Asia explained that this would mean higher resale prices since newer flats often command a higher resale price than an older flat in the same vicinity. Property analyst Ong Kah Seng believes the milestone of a million dollar flat in a non-mature town may even be reached by the end of this year. “New cooling measures (for the HDB resale market) to rein exuberance and relentless resale flat price increases, and ensure price sustainability and affordability, could be necessary,” he said.
  4. Like that also can. If I am the tenant, I will shift out too. I personally find the landlord is asking too much for just a room. Calculative landlord? Tenant moves out after 'contract' demands additional $400 rent during lockdown https://www.asiaone.com/singapore/calculative-landlord-tenant-moves-out-after-contract-demands-additional-400-rent-during https://m.facebook.com/photo?fbid=1170172693445997&set=gm.1494967074171352 Going by the T&C, the monthly rent would be doubled if the tenant has to work from home full time. $800 for a room, thanks but no thanks.
  5. Ysc3

    Everything also blame HDB

    HDB’s slow service highlighted by homeowner in complaint about leaking bathroom pipe Ms Mingli said that she waited more than 80 hours with no calls or follow up emails from HDB after her complaint Singapore – A homeowner took to social media to expound on the difficulties faced in getting the Housing & Development Board (HDB) to address a pipe leakage problem. Members of the public noted that shouldering repair costs was a more feasible option. On Tuesday (Nov 10) Facebook user Josephine Lam Mingli uploaded her first post at Complaint Singapore‘s page. The complaint consisted of her personal experience in dealing with HDB and the slow response in addressing housing problems. Ms Mingli went into great detail illustrating her experience which began with a leaking bathroom pipe in their flat located at Punggol Town. As Ms Mingli explained, they have been residents in the area since 2010 and have not stumbled upon issues until last Friday (Nov 6) when she spotted water dripping from the master bedroom bathroom. “Immediately, I called up my town council to seek for their assistance, but upon my verbal description, the officer has responded that I should report my problem to HDB instead,” said Ms Mingli. She then made a call to HDB and was informed that respective personnel would get back to her. “After waiting patiently for almost two hours, nobody has come for help nor contacted me on any follow-up,” said Ms Mingli. “I’m getting more worried as the condition is turning from bad to worst.(sic)” She called HDB once more and sought immediate attention to her problem. A few hours passed and an HDB personnel whom Ms Mingli called “J” responded to her complaint and offered assistance. However, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Ms J was working from home and couldn’t address the issue personally. Instead, she requested for photos and videos of the leak. Ms Mingli received confirmation that HDB was looking into the matter. “I was so naïve to trust their words and thought help would come soon since I got their acknowledgement,” wrote Ms Mingli. “However, more than 80 hours of waiting has passed, and no calls nor follow-up emails has been received.” According to her post, the leak began running like tap water “and pails of water were collected.” Ms Mingli called HDB once more on Monday (Nov 9) and was told an officer would get back to her as soon as possible. “I have requested to speak to their property manager or higher level in-charge, but their customer executive has rejected and claims that they can’t do anything. After a second opinion from a friend who specializes in maintenance, Ms Mingli highlighted that it was likely a sewage pipe that was leaking. “I was shocked to know and feel sick as the water my family and I have been clearing over the past four days are all waste toilet water.” Ms Mingli called HDB and informed them she would be coming over but was informed that due to the pandemic, visits without an appointment were prohibited. Furthermore, the staff were unable to set a meeting on behalf of the branch office. After suggesting handling the problem personally, Ms Mingli was told she would be held fully responsible for damages caused by a third-party contractor. “After hearing that, I almost faint. Where are their standards? Residents like me suffering, and instead of giving me a helping hand, they ask me to take responsibility and using their regulation on me,” said Ms Mingli. After a few more calls to HDB, she was allowed to get the leak fixed by a certified plumber given she would have to shoulder the costs. In her post, Ms Mingli expounded further on her disappointments with the standards and wondered where else she could go to for assistance. Members from the online community shared similar experiences and confirmed the problem had to be dealt with personally. “You have to help yourself. Get a sealant and seal off the leakage temporarily,” advised Facebook user Lim Eng Boon. Meanwhile, Facebook user Ahmad Syah posted a screenshot from the HDB website explaining who was responsible for home maintenance repairs depending on the problem. “You need to maintain the sanitary branch pipes in your flats. The town council is responsible for the maintenance of the main sanitary pipes,” read the HDB advisory on pipes.
  6. https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/cash-over-valuation-back-spotlight-rising-property-demand-drives-resale-prices Cash over valuation back in the spotlight as rising property demand drives resale prices up SINGAPORE — Having seen property prices tumble during the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) outbreak in 2003, Mr Ng thought the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic would present him with a golden opportunity to secure his dream retirement home at a discount. Instead, the 66-year-old retiree saw prices “go up tremendously” as he ended up having to fork out about S$160,000 in cash over valuation (COV) for a five-room resale Housing and Development Board (HDB) flat in Pasir Ris. The 27-year-old recently renovated flat came with a price tag of around S$650,000. Mr Ng had sold his private property in late 2019, just months before the coronavirus ravaged economies worldwide. "I panicked as I felt that if I don’t buy now, the price may increase further,” said Mr Ng, who declined to give his full name. He eventually signed an option-to-purchase (OTP) early last week for the flat, which is located on the highest floor of its block. The COV refers to the difference in the sale price of a resale flat and its actual valuation by HDB. If the valuation is lower, the difference has to be paid in cash.
  7. HELP! TOILET BOWL EXPLODED WITH SHIT IN MY PUNGGOL EAST FLAT! Dear A.S.S., Look at this shitty situation! One weekend I came home with my familly and I had to use the toilet urgently. So I went in and relieved myself. After that, I flushed. To my horror, the flush not only didn't work, it started to overflow. AND IT DIDN'T STOP OVERFLOWING. I had to run out of the toilet and try to turn off the water mains in my house, but it still didn't stop. Soon the entire house was filled with disgusting shit water. I had to ask my family to stay over at my in-laws place while i waited for the PUB and f**king slow HDB to show up and assess the damage. You can see the damage for yourself. I even saw bits of carrots and char siew floating around in the waste. YUCKS - More at AllSingaporeStuff.com http://www.allsingaporestuff.com/article/help-toilet-bowl-exploded-shit-my-punggol-east-flat FB: http://fb.com/allsgstuff - See more at: http://www.allsingaporestuff.com/article/help-toilet-bowl-exploded-shit-my-punggol-east-flat#sthash.UK9Awwmc.dpuf
  8. https://www.roads.sg/sharing-is-caring-car-cleaning-machines/ Why my carpark dun have? Locations stated on website...
  9. https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/housing/singapores-first-assisted-living-hdb-flats-for-seniors-to-launch-in-bukit-batok SINGAPORE - Singapore's first assisted living public housing in Bukit Batok for seniors who wish to live on their own and yet enjoy some care, support and communal activities will be launched for sale in next February's Build-To-Order (BTO) exercise. The new flat typology comes with a mandatory service package to support seniors to age in place, said the Ministry of National Development (MND), Housing Board (HDB) and Ministry of Health (MOH) in a joint statement on Thursday (Dec 10). Services under the package include 24-hour emergency monitoring and response service, basic health checks, simple home fixes and activities at the communal spaces within the development. All residents will have to subscribe and pay for the basic service package, which starts from $22,000 for a 15-year lease. Other services such as housekeeping, laundry, meal delivery and shared caregiving can be added on at an additional cost. Located in Bukit Batok West Avenue 9, the pilot batch of Community Care Apartments comprises about 160 units and is expected to be completed in 2024. The flats were scheduled to be launched in May but were delayed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each 32 sq m flat comes with senior-friendly fittings including grab bars and wheelchair-accessible bathroom with slip-resistant flooring to allow residents to move around their homes with ease. The flats have an open layout and come with sliding partitions to separate the living room and bedroom, along with a built-in wardrobe, cabinets and furnished kitchen to reduce renovation time. There will be furnished communal spaces on each floor for residents to share meals or participate in group activities, which serve as "extensions of their own living rooms", said the agencies. A community manager will be on-site to organise community activities and help link seniors to care services according to their needs, where necessary. Residents will also get priority for admission to the nearby Bukit Batok Care Home, should the need arise in the future. Other amenities within the development include a precinct pavilion, strolling path, activity centre, hawker centre, community garden and fitness station. Singapore's first assisted living HDB flats for seniors to launch in Bukit Batok in Feb 2021 BTO exercise The new flat typology comes with a mandatory service package to support seniors to age in place.PHOTOS: HDB Michelle Ng PUBLISHED 1 HOUR AGO FACEBOOKWHATSAPP SINGAPORE - Singapore's first assisted living public housing in Bukit Batok for seniors who wish to live on their own and yet enjoy some care, support and communal activities will be launched for sale in next February's Build-To-Order (BTO) exercise. The new flat typology comes with a mandatory service package to support seniors to age in place, said the Ministry of National Development (MND), Housing Board (HDB) and Ministry of Health (MOH) in a joint statement on Thursday (Dec 10). Services under the package include 24-hour emergency monitoring and response service, basic health checks, simple home fixes and activities at the communal spaces within the development. All residents will have to subscribe and pay for the basic service package, which starts from $22,000 for a 15-year lease. Other services such as housekeeping, laundry, meal delivery and shared caregiving can be added on at an additional cost. Located in Bukit Batok West Avenue 9, the pilot batch of Community Care Apartments comprises about 160 units and is expected to be completed in 2024. The flats were scheduled to be launched in May but were delayed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Each 32 sq m flat comes with senior-friendly fittings including grab bars and wheelchair-accessible bathroom with slip-resistant flooring to allow residents to move around their homes with ease. The flats have an open layout and come with sliding partitions to separate the living room and bedroom, along with a built-in wardrobe, cabinets and furnished kitchen to reduce renovation time. There will be furnished communal spaces on each floor for residents to share meals or participate in group activities, which serve as "extensions of their own living rooms", said the agencies. A community manager will be on-site to organise community activities and help link seniors to care services according to their needs, where necessary. Residents will also get priority for admission to the nearby Bukit Batok Care Home, should the need arise in the future. Other amenities within the development include a precinct pavilion, strolling path, activity centre, hawker centre, community garden and fitness station. Other amenities within the development include a hawker centre. PHOTO: HDB The pilot batch of Community Care Apartments comprises about 160 units and is expected to be completed in 2024. PHOTO: HDB Seniors must be 65 and above to apply for these flats. They will be able to choose a lease ranging from 15 to 35 years, in five-year increments, as long as it covers the applicant and their spouse, if any, until they are at least 95 years old. Prices for these flats start from $40,000 for a 15-year lease to $65,000 for a 35-year lease, and are required to be paid for fully upfront with cash or with Central Provident Fund (CPF) monies. Government subsidies such as the Silver Housing Bonus, which gives seniors up to $30,000 cash bonus when they sell their existing flat and use the proceeds to top-up their CPF Retirement Account, are applicable. However, these flats cannot be resold or rented out. Owners who no longer need the flat can return the flat to the HDB, which will refund them the value of the remaining lease of the flat. Seniors with more pressing care needs, such as those requiring permanent assistance with activities of daily living, will be prioritised for the flats. From next Monday to March 31, 2021, seniors and members of the public will be able to visit a life-sized showcase of the communal space, along with scale models of the block and flat, at the HDB Hub atrium at Lorong 6 Toa Payoh. A showroom of the flat will open from Jan 4, 2021. Visitors must book an appointment via HDB InfoWeb before visiting the exhibition.
  10. HDB to build diverse flat types, keep prices affordable for housing estates in prime locations source: https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/housing/prime-areas-to-be-kept-diverse-and-inclusive-with-range-of-hdb-flat-types-for?utm_medium=social&utm_source=telegram&utm_campaign=sttg SINGAPORE - A range of housing types will be built in upcoming estates in prime locations such as the Greater Southern Waterfront (GSW) to ensure that all public housing estates will have a good mix of Singaporeans, said National Development Minister Desmond Lee. These include smaller housing types such as two-room flats for seniors and rental housing for low-income families, depending on the planning parameters and the needs of different housing types, but are "deliberately injected", he said in an interview with Lianhe Zaobao. Mr Lee acknowledged the "lottery effect" of these well-located Housing Board flats, which may result in a "likely windfall" for home owners who sell these government-subsidised build-to-order (BTO) flats on the resale market. There is the issue of "inclusiveness and diversity" when these flats are allowed to be resold after the five-year minimum occupation period, he said. "If it's going to be sold and transacted at high resale prices, then there is a risk that only well-off Singaporeans can buy (flats in) those estates. And then of course, the character of the estates will change and it may be priced beyond the reach of ordinary Singaporeans," he said. "We do not want to have estates that are gentrified and that only the wealthy can afford to live (in). We want to have a good mix." To achieve that, besides introducing diverse housing, he noted that the pricing of flats must be kept affordable at the first sale by HDB and also in resales. "We may need a series of other measures to ensure that if resale is permitted for these flats, that they remain affordable for generations to come," said Mr Lee, without specifying the measures. "People will, of course, pay what they believe the market can bear in order to get these very good flats and very good locations. So some of these measures would have to cover all these fronts," he added. He cited GSW as one example of a prime site but noted that the timeline is "quite far down the line". "But there may be other sites with very prime attributes that might be rolled out in the months and years ahead," he said. Mr Lee said HDB will seek public suggestions and feedback through engagement sessions over the next few months. "We will want to make sure that these public discussions are held, people's views are obtained and then we can come up with a model that we could potentially apply in the near term," he said. More on this topic Spotlight on 'lottery effect' of flats slated for Keppel Club site Art gallery, sky taxis and seawater lagoons: Experts say endless possibilities for Greater Southern Waterfront First announced in 2013, the GSW comprises 30km of coastline stretching from the Gardens by the Bay East area to Pasir Panjang. The 2,000ha mega waterfront development - six times the size of Marina Bay and twice the size of Punggol - was sketched out by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in his 2019 National Day Rally speech. About 9,000 private and public housing units will be built on the site of Keppel Golf Club as part of the GSW, with future housing available on other sites too. Mr Lee said that even as HDB is constantly reviewing and evolving public housing policies to be responsive to Singaporeans' changing demographics and aspirations, core values remain. "We want to keep the character of all our HDB estates inclusive and diverse and to enable Singaporeans, ordinary Singaporeans, to also be able to live in parts of Singapore that one will consider as prime," he said.
  11. https://mothership.sg/2020/11/tan-chuan-jin-adopts-cat/ On Nov. 17, Tan announced on social media that he has recently adopted a male kitten. Tcj stay condo or landed? As long as Windows n gates meshed up, ensure cats not able to leave the house, dun see why cats are any different from dogs Cats dun bark also I assume less disruptive It's only a problem when some owner want cats but still insist on letting their cats roam freely Those should be punished but dun penalise the rest of us from having cats
  12. Now we bet the the driver of this truck will be regretting really hard about driving after having some drinks. Spotted on Beh Chia Lor's Facebook page and some of our Whatsapp group chats, is this video of a trailer truck crashing into an HDB block at Block 152 Yung Ho Road. It happened on 16 Nov 2020. Thankfully, the tree that the truck knocked down managed to stop it from crashing into one of the first level HDB unit. Rest In Peace, tree... The truck driver has since been arrested for drunk driving. Netizens' comments were naturally not kind to the truck driver... 34c5433d-4976-4664-8e03-ca6af42dface.MP4
  13. https://www.straitstimes.com/business/invest/irresponsible-tactics-to-lure-property-investors-come-under-fire-from-authorities
  14. Have you encountered trouble at carpark entries and realised that you needed to have another go with the IU scanner but the car behind is so close that you cant even reverse a tiny bit? We sure have and know how troublesome it is get the car behind to reverse so that you can re do the IU scan. Often, the driver behind refuses to bulge leaving you in an awkward position and frustrated at the driver behind you. Something like this happened on 22nd of October 2020 at Crawford Court between a Prius Trans-Cab and an unknown camera car. However, egos and tempers got the best of them and things turned out ugly. Who was in the wrong? Watch the video as posted by SG Road Vigilante and let us know in the comments below!
  15. Ysc3

    Hdb flat renovation

    anyone did renovation to their flat in the past six months ? got reliable renovation company to recommend ? not doing fanciful reno ... eg no customized furniture except the kitchen cabinet, so dun really need ID but more like a supervisor to get the job done. alternatively, can also tell me which company to stay away from.
  16. StreetFight3r

    To park here or not? Fair?

    Post from ROADS.sg
  17. Has anyone tried renewing hdb season parking today? I keep getting errors. Don't think it's due to my cc - tried with 3 different cc also cannot go through, plus the error msg says sth like "contact merchant" Don't think i can just go down to a hdb office to renew rite? the website only mention online renewal method...
  18. 1.2 million for a 5 room DBSS flat between the 28th and 30th floor. Nowhere near the top floor and it can break all previous records. Strange times indeed. https://www.tnp.sg/news/singapore/dbss-flat-natura-loft-bishan-sold-12m Flats at Natura Loft in Bishan continue to fetch a handsome price, with the recent sale of a five-room unit there again crossing the $1 million mark. According to data from the Housing Board, the flat, with just under 90 years of its lease left, was sold for $1,208,000 this month. It is believed to be the highest resale price for a Design, Build and Sell Scheme (DBSS) unit, Chinese newspaper Shin Min Daily News reported yesterday. The 120 sq m unit is believed to be between the 28th and 30th storeys. The previous record price for a DBSS unit was the $1,205,000 paid for a five-room flat on the 39th-storey at City View in Boon Keng.
  19. HDB, private home prices rise in Q3, defying recessionary pressures Read more at https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/hdb-private-home-prices-rise-q3-defying-recessionary-pressures TD;LR HDB resale prices rose 1.4 per cent in the third quarter of the year from 2019 Private home prices grew 0.8 per cent in the same quarter Analyst pointed to the pent-up demand from homebuyers unable to view property in the second quarter Various government measures, BTO project delays and general investor confidence were also factors driving demand SINGAPORE — Property prices have continued to beat expectations despite the economic downturn. Prices of Housing and Development Board (HDB) resale flats rose 2.1 per cent in the third quarter from a year earlier, and private home prices gained 0.7 per cent year-on-year. Analysts noted that demand for homes has spiked substantially in the past three months since the end of the circuit breaker in June when stay-home curbs were lifted, and said that the Government's stimulus measures and past property curbs may have played an instrumental role in keeping home prices up during the economic headwinds. The unabated flurry of transactions from mid-June, when property viewings were allowed to resume, continued to drive demand for homes, suggesting that the euphoria over Singapore’s ongoing second phase of its economic reopening has yet to subside, they said. Quarter-on-quarter, HDB resale prices rose by 1.4 per cent, the largest quarterly increase in at least six years, flash estimates released by HDB on Thursday (Oct 1) showed. This is the fifth straight quarterly gain in the price index, which analysts said was further proof that the market has started to stabilise after six years of decline from 2013 to 2018. Based on data tracked by real estate agency PropNex, HDB resale flat transactions are on track to hit 7,000 units for the quarter. Ms Wong Siew Ying, the firm’s head of research and content, said that this would make it the strongest quarterly showing since the third quarter of 2018. Private property values rose 0.8 per cent in the three months ended Sept 30 in quarter-on-quarter terms, the highest quarterly rise since the third quarter of last year, the Urban Redevelopment Authority’s preliminary estimates on Thursday showed. The figures come on the back of an 11-month high in home sales in August, defying the usual market lull during the month of Hungry Ghost Festival on the Chinese calendar that ended mid-September. WHAT IS DRIVING DEMAND FOR HDB RESALE FLATS? 1. Government measures Ms Christine Sun, head of research and consultancy at property firm OrangeTee & Tie, said that stimulus packages totalling more than S$100 billion to prop up the economy during Singapore’s worst recession as well as past cooling measures have helped to keep HDB prices up. “The mortgage servicing ratio, which was imposed to tighten the disbursement of housing loans, may have prevented buyers from overleveraging and selling their flats at excessively low prices during the current market slowdown,” she said. Mr Lee Sze Teck, director of research at real estate firm Huttons Asia, said that revisions in government policies last year have also continued to drive the market as homebuyers are now looking at resale flats more favourably. He noted that the raised income ceiling and higher grants for first-time buyers announced in September last year for those applying to buy a resale flat continued to boost demand. He expects prices to continue appreciating in the current fourth quarter. 2. Delay in BTO housing projects Analysts said that the expected delay in Build-to-Order (BTO) public housing projects due to the halt in construction work during the two-month circuit breaker period in April and May has also diverted some demand to the resale market. Ms Sun said: “Some buyers have also bought HDB resale flats that were more affordable than private homes during the current economic uncertainties.” Ms Wong of PropNex estimated that HDB resale prices could rise as much as by 3 per cent for the whole of this year. “We think the signs are positive and point to further stabilisation in values,” she said. WHAT IS DRIVING DEMAND FOR PRIVATE HOMES? 1. Relief measures The gains in private home prices were led by landed property, which surged 3.8 per cent in the past three months, as well as by property outside of the core central region, which refers to the prime districts. Various temporary relief measures have also removed the need for homeowners and developers to slash prices too drastically to move sales, Ms Sun said. These measures include the waiver of charges for developers applying to extend their completion or disposal deadlines as well as allowing borrowers to defer their loan repayments. Ms Sun also said that market sentiment may continue to improve and demand for properties may remain strong in the coming months, as more sectors reopen and the country eases into the third phase of reopening the economy. 2. Investor confidence PropNex's chief executive officer Ismail Gafoor believes that investors remain confident in the market, even as the recent clampdown on the re-issue of options to purchase for buyers may have a slight cooling effect on demand. “Several factors probably prompted buyers to action, including the low interest rates, liquidity in the system, sensitive pricing by developers and re-sellers, and the buyers’ faith in the positive outlook of the property market over the long term,” he said. Mr Leonard Tay, head of research at real estate company Knight Frank Singapore, said: “This is a little bit reminiscent of 2009 when the private residential market in Singapore witnessed a fast and furious recovery in the midst of the global financial crisis, where prices and sales volumes rebounded in a time of uncertainty. “Perhaps in a somewhat similar manner, overall private home prices that were originally expected to fall by about 5 per cent in 2020, would now generally remain unchanged from end-2019.”
  20. In our fast-paced and hectic society, it is easy to get triggered when unexpected things happen to you as we can see from this video that has been posted on SG Road Vigilante. In this video that was shot in Yishun a few days back, we can see a van which is the camera vehicle, coming to the rear of a Volkswagen Scirocco. While waiting for the gantry to be lifted, the car rolled back as one pair of its wheels were on a hump. The van driver gave the car a tap of its horn, triggering the Scirocco driver to come down and confront the van driver. For those who have no experience with dual-clutch gearboxes, some, if not most, have the tendency to roll back if the car is on a slope as the car behaves very much like a manual car in start-stop situations. Hence, the Scirocco driver wasn't trying to reverse on purpose. Was the horn necessary? Was it necessary to follow so close to the Scirocco seeing that he had trouble at the gantry? And was the van driver guilty of tailgating out of the carpark? Or was it simply just a case of an ill-mannered Volkswagen driver having a bad day? What do you guys reckon? Let us know in the comment box!
  21. Lai which mcfer is this? Confess https://mothership.sg/2020/07/clementi-hdb-flat-1-million/ A five-room HDB flat at Clementi was purchased on July 5 for a staggering S$1.04 million, and it was done so in cash. Buyers paid for flat in cash The 1,248 sq ft unit at Block 441A Clementi Avenue 3 was priced at S$833 per sq feet, according to Edge Prop. The flat is located within Clementi Towers, a cluster of HDB blocks including 441A, 441B, 442 and 443. 4-room and 5-room flats are located in 441A. The other three blocks comprise 3-room and 4-room flats. Clementi Towers is also part of the Clementi integrated transport hub, including Clementi Mall, Clementi MRT station and the bus interchange. According to Edge Prop, the flats have 91 years left on their lease. Edge Prop reported that the buyers are an elderly couple who are downsizing from a landed property in West Coast. They also paid for the HDB flat in cash. The deal was closed in a day. The Clementi HDB flat was on the market for about 10 days and had two separate viewings. The previous record for the block was held by a five-room flat, also in Block 441A, sold for S$1.038 million (S$810 per sq ft) in July 2019.
  22. Bought a brand new car and want to avoid door dings? Or perhaps you're a car enthusiast and want to keep your car away from potential busybodies? You can now create your own private parking space even though you don't live in a private estate! Check out this dude in the video below and how he does this...We wonder what this guy drives that gives him the right to have his own special private parking lot. Whichever car that is going to be parked in that lot at 406 Fernvale Road MSCP better be a nice car... Check out the comments people on SG Road Vigilante have to say! 104247240_2999667930147081_5514356786496781035_n.mp4
  23. Neutrino

    Solar panels on HDB roof.

    From my high HDB I can look down on 12 storey HDB. There looks to be some work going on on a group of 12 storey HDB nearby where they appear to be installing solar panels on the roof. Is this correct and have they been installed elsewhere? I think it's a good idea.
×