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Found 210 results

  1. miken92

    Passion for racing

    Hello everyone . Is anyone here passionate about racing
  2. <Why Koenigsegg Never Went Racing, And Why It Doesn't Plan to Start Christian von Koenigsegg explains why his cars have never competed at Le Mans, and why he doesn't intend to participate in the new Hypercar class. KOENIGSEGG Despite building some of the most innovative supercars on earth, Koenigsegg does not currently have a racing team. That's not for lack of trying: Founder Christian von Koenigsegg actually built a viable race car with intent to compete at the 24 Hours of Le Mans when his company was in its infancy. But it never happened, and during a lengthy conversation with the man behind the Swedish performance car company, we learned more about why his Le Mans ambitions fell apart—and whether he hopes to try again. In 2007, Koenigsegg built a fully-functional race car that exactly followed the FIA's Group GT1 rules. The race car, called CCGT, bore a strong resemblance to Koenigsegg's second production model, the CCR. But its roots went back even further, to the very first prototype Koenigsegg built, called CC. As explained on a Koenigsegg company blog post, the original CC, and the race car it spawned, was designed to fit exactly into GT1's dimension requirements: The car could be two meters wide at the maximum, and the cockpit had to span 70 percent of the vehicle's overall width. It had a dry weight of 2200 pounds (significantly below the minimum weight for GT1, which would mean adding ballast to reach the required weight) and was powered by a naturally aspirated V-8 making well over 600 horsepower. But two months after the CCGT's first shakedown runs, the ACO and FIA had a change of heart. The governing bodies banned carbon-fiber monocoque construction, which was used in every Koenigsegg road car and thus formed the basis of the CCGT. The regulators also raised the minimum production requirement dramatically. Previously, an automaker was required to construct 20 street-legal examples of a model, in total, to be eligible to race. After the 2007 change, that number rose to 350 cars per year, impossible for a tiny automaker like Koenigsegg to achieve. The CCGT was ruled out of the class before it ever competed in a single race. The only Koenigsegg CCGT ever built. | KOENIGSEGG "We were aiming to go racing in the GT1 series, which was perfect for our type of cars—road-going hypercars turned race cars" von Koenigsegg told Road & Track during a recent, lengthy conversation. "Then they shut it down right when we were about to go racing, which was very annoying. Since then, there hasn't been any series for these types of cars." The rule change left von Koenigsegg without a place to take his supercars racing. "Even if we would be allowed to go to the highest level of GT racing, we would be competing against Porsche 911s and Ferrari 488s"—sports cars built to vastly different performance goals than Koenigsegg's cars, which commanded well over half a million dollars each. Even if von Koenigsegg had wanted to compete in such a class, he worried that his cars would be "completely downgraded through Balance of Performance via restrictors, because we are not supposed to be any faster. And then it would be just a super-expensive racing car, which would cost more to repair than a 911, and we might even get beaten by a 911 because of BoP, while in reality, they are completely different vehicles. That doesn't make any sense." So Koenigsegg's racing dreams died in 2007, before they could ever become real. But what about today? The WEC's new Hypercar class debuted this year, and it was seemingly built for exactly the kind of extreme vehicles that Koenigsegg builds. But the man behind the Swedish supercar company is unconvinced. "Of course, they started this Hypercar series at Le Mans, but in the end it turned out to be some kind of LMP car again, so it's just a new name for the same kind of thing, more or less." Does von Koenigsegg see a racing future for his cars? Not under the current rules. "The alternative, I guess, is to build some kind of a Le Mans Prototype, which has no relation to our road cars, which I don't find too appealing. I would like to go back to the GT1 type of class, where we [could] see Bugattis, Paganis, Koenigseggs—modified road cars featuring completely different technologies. Not this silhouette racing where you have the same chassis under different bodies. Granted, it would be a very expensive series, given the price of these cars, but then we could build up on what we have. Everyone could showcase something you could actually buy, if you're extremely wealthy. That's what we would like, but I'm not sure if it could ever happen.">
  3. This video is, as the kids say, very 'happening'. For those confused with what had just happened in the video, let me unpack it for you. We start with the camcar (the Volkswagen Roc driver) driving down Yio Chu Kang road. As the black car in front of him starts to speed, the camcar driver revs his engine and chases his 'friend' in a silly speeding game. As both cars speed down the lane, the drivers try their best to avoid crashing into other vehicles. However, to the camcar's dismay, he crashes into a grey car after entering a bend. Luckily for his 'friend', he manages to squeeze past the car before it changes lanes and avoids a collision. The video ends with several pictures of the blue Volkswagen Scirocco after the crash. Who is at fault here? As evident from the footage of the accident, it is safe to say that the Volkswagen Roc is at fault here. After all, it is common knowledge that street racing is illegal in Singapore. According to the Road Traffic Act, individuals found guilty of street racing will face a punishment of a hefty fine, mandatory imprisonment and forfeiture of the vehicle involved. Following the Tanjong Pagar incident earlier this year, the authorities have introduced a series of amendments to the Road Traffic Act. This includes higher fines and longer jail times for individuals found guilty of street racing in Singapore. First-time offenders will face a maximum fine of $5,000 and up to a year in jail. Repeat offenders will be fined up to $10,000 and jailed for up to two years. Netizens' reactions While I'm not an expert at car insurance, I highly doubt that the insurance company would be willing to pay the Roc driver after they find out about his little game of cat and mouse with his 'friend'. Yep, and they look like this: I thought the video was shot from a third person's perspective as well, it took me a while to realise that it was the Volkswagen driver's POV. 😓 -------------------- Thinking of selling your car? sgCarMart Quotz guarantees the highest selling price for your car. We’ll even give you $100 cash if you find a better offer elsewhere! Get a free quote to find out how much your car is worth today!
  4. There's nothing like celebrating National Day with a little racing between an SUV and an MPV. A white Honda Odyssey was spotted going toe to toe with a silver Mercedes GLA200 along the TPE expressway on Monday (Aug 9). The video starts off with the white Honda in the lead, as the driver recklessly switched into the camcar lane. Footage from the rear of the camcar showed that both cars were initially speeding along the expressway, with the silver Mercedes desperate to outrun its fellow counterpart. With the Honda quickly gaining speed, the driver of the Mercedes decided to resort to overtaking the camcar on its left - a really dangerous move given that all vehicles were travelling at a relatively high speed. As both vehicles zipped in and out between other cars on the road, it was tough to judge who won the race. Netizens' reactions Who really won this race? --- Thinking of selling your car? sgCarMart Quotz guarantees the highest selling price for your car. We’ll even give you $100 cash if you find a better offer elsewhere! Get a free quote to find out how much your car is worth today!
  5. Driver of McLaren 720s realise a car is a car, it can never fly 😳😂 https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/driver-taken-hospital-after-early-morning-crash-along-ecp 525cc210-79e0-47e1-a79a-fd243508c11d.MP4
  6. ToniTrex

    Car Closest to Formula 1

    Hey guys ! Just curious and wanting to know cars that have a similar technology to what Formula 1 car has. The closest could ever get to a formula 1 car and why. Could be looks, technology, speed, all of the above? you name it. Personally my top 2 picks are the LaFerrari as it is as close as it could get to a F1 car for its technology, and Lexus LFA for its Screaming V10 sound.
  7. All you want to know about the Singapore car scene... https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/tanjong-pagar-crash-racing-speeding-rounding-traffic-police-14435890 IN FOCUS: No more need for speed? Singapore's illegal road racing scene fades even as concerns remain After MP Ng Ling Ling asked in Parliament if the Traffic Police would consider stepping up enforcement in light of the fatal, high-speed crash in Tanjong Pagar, CNA investigates the scale of the local speedster scene. SINGAPORE: The windows of the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution 9 sports car were rolled down, letting in the acrid fumes of burning rubber and deafening groans of modified exhaust pipes. The Evo roared through the relatively straight thoroughfare that is Stamford Road, well above the speed limit of 50km/h, recalled Adam (not his real name) of that evening in August 2014, when he sat in the front passenger seat. The traffic lights and other vehicles still out and about after midnight meant this kind of speed had to be done in short bursts. But the Evo was just one in a convoy of about 80 performance cars speeding through the streets that make up “Orchard Gudang (OG)”, a roughly 10km-long rectangular “rounding” route that runs from the Orchard shopping district in the west to the Marina Bay area in the east. It is also named after a race track in Pasir Gudang, Johor. There were cars like a Nissan Silvia S14, Subaru WRX STI and Honda Civic Type R on the route, all with a “minimum requirement to be loud and flashy”, said Adam. “Honestly, it was just to drive fast and hard for fun,” he told CNA. “There was no race or challenge.”
  8. Bored because you can't travel? Why not challenge your friends to a drag race and get fined under the Road Traffic Act? On 18th January, as seen on SG Road Vigilante, a group of approximately eight people were at this illegal drag race. Seems like there were five spectators, two racers and one starter. It wasn't a very fair race because the starter's hand was blocking the Volkswagen Scirocco. It started later than the Mitsubishi Lancer, who saw a golden opportunity (his view not blocked by the starter) and raced ahead. Where's the sportsmanship, brother? Though, if you ask me, I think this race wasn't about speed. The race track was short, and the cars were driving carefully. Yknow why? Cuz' slow and steady wins the race. Some Facebook users were hypothesizing other reasons for the gathering, while others bashed them for their apparent drag racing. Whatever it is, the uploader shouldn't have bao toh (read: sabotage) his friends. Actually, come to think of it, who was videoing this? Weren't there already eight people in the frame? Or also +1 cameraman? Edit: Added in the original video source https://www.facebook.com/groups/sgroadshallofshame/permalink/1927162840764549/ for easier reference – leaving it to you guys to decide what this 'drag race' really is.
  9. Can someone recommend me a reliable workshop that sells and installs AP racing rotor? thanks.
  10. Opening 15th Jan 2021 in China. Main actress is Jay Chou's wife.
  11. 5 weeks' jail, 3-year driving ban for 2 men involved in illegal race in Lim Chu Kang Source: https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/courts-crime/illegal-race-in-lim-chu-kang-lands-two-men-5-weeks-jail-and-a-ban-from Goh Tze Ming (left) and Khairulanwar Ismail were given five weeks' jail and a $1,500 fine each for racing illegally.ST PHOTOS: WONG KWAI CHOW SINGAPORE - They sped down Lim Chu Kang Road in similar cars and clocked almost equal breakneck speeds in their illegal race. On Tuesday (Sept 10), Goh Tze Ming, 37, and Khairulanwar Ismail, 26, were given the same sentence - five weeks' jail and a $1,500 fine each. They will also be disqualified from driving all classes of vehicles for three years after their release. The men, who were both driving a Volkswagen GTI, had denied that they were involved in the illegal race, which took place on Dec 9, 2016. The pair also similarly claimed trial against the charge of illegal racing, an offence under the Road Traffic Act. During the hearing, Goh said that he had been rushing to go to the toilet, while Khairulanwar claimed that he was speeding because he wanted to check his engine check-light. Deputy Public Prosecutor Senthilkumaran Sabapathy rubbished the claims, calling them "illogical, unsubstantiated and unbelievable". He added: "It is simply implausible and fanciful that (they) happened to be speeding, at almost twice the speed limit and right next to each other, at a place where a race was ongoing at the material time." The court heard that the two men were arrested by Traffic Police (TP) officers during a sting operation led by Inspector Pardeep Dass, who had received intelligence that there was going to be an illegal race in the area. Together with two other TP officers, Insp Pardeep arrived at the scene in an unmarked car. The officers saw people standing around 40 vehicles parked along Lim Chu Kang Road towards Neo Tiew Road. At 1.07am, the cars driven by Goh and Khairulanwar were seen making a U-turn towards Jalan Bahar before coming to a stop side by side for about 10 seconds. Insp Pardeep then saw both cars speeding off at the same time. The TP officers were activated to pursue them. Goh was caught driving at 132kmh, while Khairulanwar had clocked 136kmh - nearly twice the speed limit of 70kmh. Both men will also start their sentences on the same date - Sept 19.
  12. Turboflat4

    Rally driver chio bu dies :(

    https://www.skysports.com/more-sports/motor-racing/news/15749/12101426/laura-salvo-dies-after-portugal-rally-crash https://www.straitstimes.com/sport/formula-one/motor-racing-spanish-rally-driver-laura-salvo-dies-in-horror-crash So sad. 😭 Rest in peace. 😥
  13. Duckduck

    I miss WRC

    sad to see it lose venues & sponsorships... maybe itll be back in future...
  14. We know that all of us should be keeping a safe distance from each other in such times. But we reckon these guys that have been caught on video might have taken it abit too far. This video, as posted by SG Road Vigilante, shows a slow moving camera car (claimed to be doing 80km/h but it looks more like 60km/h to us) that was traveling on KPE towards TPE chancing upon a bunch or cars that were abit too keen to distance themselves from any traffic around them. Apparently this happened on the wee hours of 16th May morning and from what we can gather, the lead car is a R34 Nissan Skyline that zoomed past the camera car at a speed that seemed to double the legal speed limit of the KPE. Its hard to tell from the video but other than the Skyline, we could also identify a few other cars including a Suzuki Swift, a Volkswagen Golf, a Volkswagen Jetta (that might have been the same guy that was charged for organising illegal street racing), a Mitsubishi Evo 9 and a couple of Honda Civics. Interestingly, most of the comments were attacking the camera car for being slow. We wonder why. On the other hand, there will always be keyboard warriors that come out with weird and silly comments like the example below... 95563179_890011821514718_986642270115562833_n.mp4
  15. A popular local Singer/Songwriter has taken to her facebook page to rant about cars making loud explosive noises where she lives. 1 bang 2.mp4 In her post, Beverly Morata Grafton pointed out in her post she has been experiencing "exhausts have been popping off like gunshots from 10:30pm and counting. And like every weekend since mid April, they will do so until 4am plus in the morning..." From her photos and videos that she provided, we gathered that these incidents happenen along Yishun Ave 1, where Sinopec Yishun is situated at. This stretch has a speed camera but car enthusiasts are known to still gun their cars there while heading towards the Yishun Dam. We will not go into the rest of her post as it can be a bit demeaning and vulgar. For those who are curious, you can view her post below. In the video that was taken on the 25th of April, we could identify a white Volkswagen Golf accelerating away quickly from the petrol station before letting off some loud bangs, much to the annoyance of the songwriter. Being a post on the writer's personal page, it was no surprise to find the comments supporting her views. But what do you guys think? More pops and bangs for everyone? Or should we cooperate for quieter neighbourhoods?
  16. Could this be another case of street racing spotted on our roads during the Circuit Breaker period? Spotted on Reckless Driver SG's facebook page, a video has been posted showing the camera car driving slowly on the middle land before a small group of cars went past it at a higher speed. Yes. this is milder than the incident on the KPE that had the drivers in the video arrested, with only three cars shown in the short 40-plus-second clip. In fact, we reckon the 'tiong chias' were doing approximately 120-140km/h while the camera car was doing 70-80km/h. The cars, likely a Ford Focus, a Honda FD Civic and a Honda Integra were caught on camera at around 11:20pm on the 25th of May heading towards AYE Jurong inside the CTE tunnel. 1.mp4 On another note, we were surprised to find most of the comments attacking the video owner, saying that the camera car was road-hogging. Do you agree? Let us know!
  17. Singapore has its very own Takumi! (The main character of Initial D, btw) A video of a car with unknown origins racing against a Suzuki Hayabusa has received over 40 shares under 5 hours! If you haven't already seen the video, here you go! The original video is from District Singapore's Facebook page. What's happening? In the video, it starts with the Hayabusa abruptly cutting into the cam car's lane and causing the car to swerve and spin out of control. But, the car driver somehow manages to retain back control and continue on his merry way. The kicker? Image: New Initial D Legend 1: Awakening (Sanzigen, Liden Films, Sentai Filmworks) That's not even the best part! If you were observant, you would have noticed a bunch of coins on the dashboard of the car. Watch the video again. The coins barely move even with all the spinning and swerving! Very much like the cup of water Takumi uses in Initial D no? What the people say Hayabusa good siol Confirm There’s that possibility Lol I’m just glad no one got hurt.
  18. This video has gone viral among the car enthusiasts community in Singapore. A white Hyundai i30 has been filmed by the camera car's passenger showing the Korean car cutting across lanes recklessly with signaling along the SLE. Obviously trying to taunt or block the camera car (an Audi), we have no idea what is the story behind this incident as the video does not come with any audio. The video lasts for 30 seconds and could well have been going on for sometime. We hope nothing bad comes out of this road rage incident. P.S. Dear Hyundai driver, maybe you should watch less video clips on Youtube about Osaka's infamous street racers... ef6b0a0d-6339-4962-9dda-e287bb98811c.MP4
  19. Motul Brake Fluids for the street or the race track Motul lubricants protects and takes care of you and your vehicle. From engine and transmission oils, to coolant and brake fluids, Motul offers you a huge selection of products to suit almost any application. The Motul range of 100% synthetic brake fluids comprises of 5 different options which are specifically engineered for the highly-developed vehicles of today, including: • RBF (Racing Brake Fluid) 600 and 660 Factory Line; • DOT 3&4, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 Brake Fluids. The RBF 600 Factory Line and RBF 660 Factory Line are a poly glycol-based brake fluid designed for the most demanding racing conditions. Poly glycol-based brake fluids are less compressible compared to those that are silicone-based even when heated, which prevents a spongy-feeling brake pedal in instances of long and hard brake application. Both RBF 600 and RBF 660 Factory Line are compatible with all types of hydraulic-actuated brake and clutch systems requiring a non-silicone synthetic fluid. Developed to resist high temperature and wet-weather conditions with a high dry boiling point of 312°C and a wet boiling point of 216°Cfor extreme thermal resistance and stability, RBF 600 Factory Line is specifically designed to resist the high temperatures of racing brakes.Itis superior to conventional DOT 5.1 (non silicone-based), DOT 5 and conventional DOT 4 (silicone-based) brake fluids, which ensures effective braking is maintainedat all times throughout races. RBF 660 Factory Line features a dry boiling point of 325°C, higher than RBF 600 Factory Line. It isdesigned to resist the extreme temperatures generated in carbon and ceramic racing brakesystems, which can rapidly rise to over 900°C in extreme conditions,however it can also be used with conventional steel brake discs. RBF 600 and RBF 660 Factory Linegreatly exceeds the performance of DOT 3, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 standards.Combined with their outstanding anti-vapour lock performance, RBF 600 and RBF 660Factory Line have become well-trusted brake fluids in many races. RBF Factory Line brake fluids should not be mixed with brake fluids of lower performance, particularly silicone-based or mineral-based (LHM) brake fluids. Motul DOT 3&4 Brake Fluid is a polyglycol-based brake fluid designed for normal driving andin all types of applications including hydraulic-actuated brake and clutch systems meeting DOT 4 and DOT 3 manufacturer’s recommendations. The dry and wet boiling points of 245°C and 155°C respectively is superior to regular DOT 3 and DOT 4 brake fluids, which allows DOT 3&4 to last longer in your vehicle. It is also perfectly neutral and anti-corrosive, so you can be sure the seals in your vehicle’s braking system won’t suffer as a result. Motul DOT 5.1 Brake Fluid is a polyglycol-based brake fluid for all types of hydraulic-actuated brake and clutch systems in accordance with DOT 3, DOT 4 and DOT 5.1 manufacturer’s recommendations. It maintains a higher dry and wet boiling point of 272°C and 185°C respectively compared to DOT3&4 and DOT 4 brake fluids. The lower viscosity of 820mm2/s allows for easier fluid circulation in the brake lines,making it particularly suited foranti-lock braking systems (ABS) as well as heavy-duty uses such as fleet vehicles or trucks. Motul DOT 3&4, DOT 5.1 and RBF 600 and 660 is mixable with other non silicone-based brake fluids. For more information on the full range of Motul Brake Fluids
  20. Racing up Ulu Yam/Genting – why do we still do this? source: https://paultan.org/2020/01/13/dont-take-racing-to-the-streets-take-it-to-the-track/ Time and time again, we see incidents of sports car and supercar owners racing on the public highway. Often driving in large groups, these individuals travel at high speeds on roads frequented by other motorists simply going about their own business, and they often end up in massive accidents. Most recently, a video posted by Azman Nor on Facebook – which showed a Renault Megane RS hitting a Proton Wira and flipping over – exhibited the public’s negative perception of these irresponsible road users, with many pouring scorn over actions that could so easily have been fatal. The road on which this accident took place, the B23 leading to Ulu Yam Baharu, is a popular destination for two- and four-wheeled enthusiasts looking for a spirited blast – as is the nearby road from Batang Kali to Genting Highlands – due to its sweeping corners and thrilling elevation changes. For the Initial D generation, it’s the perfect touge substitute. As many of us who have driven there will know, however, it is also extremely treacherous. The roads consist mostly of tight two-lane tarmac, with plenty of blind bends that are often badly surfaced, potentially causing hard-cornering cars to go off their intended line – and straight into oncoming traffic. And that’s before you take into account the fact that most stretches are pitch dark at night. Despite this, however, plenty of people continue to drive hard and fast on these roads, taking liberties not only by driving at ridiculous speeds, but also cutting into oncoming lanes in the corners. Even some of the local motoring media are guilty of this – I for one will admit to being one of them, having gotten into a serious single-vehicle crash there a few years ago. So I know how easily it can all go wrong in a split second. But it doesn’t take someone like me to tell you just how dangerous speeding is. Even on a relatively straight and empty highway, driving significantly above the speed limit opens you up to the possibility of a huge crash that can maim or kill you. On a twisty rural road with slow-moving traffic, the risk only multiplies. And don’t think for a second that your Ferrari’s sticky tyres and arsenal of driver aids are going to be enough to save you. While the advent of stability control remains the single biggest improvement in vehicle safety, even the most advanced systems can only go so far to compensate for excessive speed, the limits of grip or your lack of talent. The instant you lose control at high speeds, it is often too late. Driving or riding recklessly also gives us car and bike enthusiasts a bad name. We already have a lot on our plate, from rising car prices to the growing extinction of the sports car market, losing out to the ever-popular crossover (groan). We don’t need the public to turn against our simple love of driving too, do we? But it doesn’t have to be that way. Malaysia may no longer have the multitude of race circuits that we used to, but we still have a world-class facility just an hour’s drive away from the city centre – and the barrier of entry into the world of sanctioned motorsports is going down. Race organisers like our very own Malaysia Speed Festival (MSF) are offering track days at the Sepang International Circuit from as low as RM300 for two hours, and there you can drive as fast as you like – so long as you abide to a few simple safety regulations. Those of a more competitive bent can opt for time attack events, which are held not only by MSF but also other reputable entities like Grass Racing Autosports (GRA) and Sucimuci Motorsports. These events often have categories for road cars at affordable prices, catered to those with somewhat tighter belts. And while proper multi-car racing remains an expensive affair, series like our Saga Cup are much more cost-efficient and provide more door-to-door racing than even the most exciting Formula 1 race. And what about those who still want to experience the thrill of a public road? Well, this year MSF is hosting its MSF Touge Series of hillclimb events, held on exactly the type of twisty, hilly roads that enthusiasts love – but, most importantly, with the safety of being closed to traffic and managed by people who have decades of motorsports experience. It too is open to road cars, requiring the bare minimum of safety equipment. With all these options for the budding racer, the excuse of sanctioned motorsports being prohibitively expensive is no longer valid. It never was, anyway – it was perhaps understandable (but not excusable) for low-budget drivers to speed on the public highway, but if you can afford a sports car or even a moderately powerful hot hatch, you can afford a track day. So take your need for speed to the track. And when you are driving on a public road, do it sanely and responsibly by obeying all traffic rules. Lastly, drive within your limits of both your car and yourself, and don’t be pressured by other drivers to speed up. Remember, when you’re sharing the road with other users, safety always comes first. And of course, we at paultan.org try to be responsible when we take test cars out for a drive. While we do evaluate a car’s performance characteristics, we do it within the scope of what an average driver is capable of, and we do not push it to its absolute limits. With certain high performance vehicles, we rent a circuit to test them out, or have the authorities close the road – see our first, second and third Driven Web Series hot hatch episodes for examples – or rent an airfield as with our million-ringgit sports cars episode. We will never compromise safety for the sake of readership or viewership. Here's are some of the comments.
  21. 5 things you should know about the 300V Power Racing 5W30 Credits: @wheel2hand.chang - The SAE 5W-30 viscosity enables to compensate medium engine oil dilution by unburned fuel Another effect of fuel leaking into the crankcase is oil dilution. This causes the lubricant to lose viscosity, meaning that the films formed are weaker and less capable of withstanding high loads that can occur at certain points, such as the rod bearings and crankshaft areas. What happens if the viscosity becomes too low? This causes contact between the metal surfaces, leading to rapid wear of the bearings due to friction. As the fuel is subject to high temperatures in the crankcase, some of it evaporates, meaning that, in the case of diesel fuel, the portion of biofuel becomes concentrated. This causes the biodiesel to be less fluid and more viscous than the diesel fuel, which causes the lubricant to thicken. - It provides maximum oil film resistance at very high temperature therefore reducing engine wear. youtuber, Piotr Tester did a friction test to simulate engine operation. And Motul 300V 5W-30 scored an astonising 0.10 mark where the result is lower the better. - It has a friction modifier - maximum power output, decrease operating temperature. POWER & TORQUE 300V Power and torque performances: increased witht he latest evolution of 300V based Ester Core technology. Test performed on 3.6 Porsche Cup racing engine. - It reduces considerably oil consumption thanks to its low volatility properties. Oil Consumption Follow-Up 300V - Is suitable for Rally or Short distance races
  22. Fu11thr0tt1e

    Truck Drag Racing

    https://www.facebook.com/LikeCarAndMotorcycle/videos/372348020016320/
  23. And now this https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/errant-singapore-motorists-barred-leaving-malaysia-10998904?cid=fbcna Pattern more than badminton KUALA LUMPUR: Motorists from Singapore with outstanding summonses should be barred from leaving Malaysia until they settle the amount owed, said Malaysian senator Rabiyah Ali in parliament on Wednesday (Dec 5). Rabiyah said the proposal is aimed at curbing Singaporean drivers who use the country’s highways as a testing ground for their vehicles’ speed. “The problem pertaining to the illegal racing and reckless driving by luxury car drivers and high-powered motorcycles from Singapore has been a tough challenge for us to solve.
  24. Altis72

    API Racing BBK

    Does anyone know if we have to use API Racing brake pads for API Racing BBK or can we use aftermarket brake pads. Thanks.
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