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Found 124 results

  1. Driver of McLaren 720s realise a car is a car, it can never fly 😳😂 https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/driver-taken-hospital-after-early-morning-crash-along-ecp 525cc210-79e0-47e1-a79a-fd243508c11d.MP4
  2. Local celebrity Gurmit Singh was fined S$800 and banned from driving for three months for speeding on Tuesday (Jun 8). The 56-year-old actor and presenter, best known for his sitcom character Phua Chu Kang, pleaded guilty to one count under the Road Traffic Act for exceeding the speed limit while driving a vehicle. He drove at a speed of 131kmh at about 9.30pm on Apr 12 this year along Woodlands Avenue 12 towards Seletar Expressway, on a road where the limit was 70kmh, the court heard. The prosecutor sought a driving ban and left the sentence to the court. She said Singh has no prior convictions. Singh told the court that he was driving to fetch his son from the workplace he was interning at when he noticed a "flapping sound". "After I got him I wanted him to hear the same sound, so I realised it comes out at 100kmh," he said. "Of course I'm not saying I should drive at that speed at that street, but it was just a short (distance). I don't know how I got 131, I wish I knew, but I just ask the court's understanding that I'm not this reckless driver who does this daily. It's just a one-off thing I wanted my son to hear." District Judge Salina Ishak told him he could have put his son's life in danger, as well as his own. "I understand, your honour. I regret doing what I did," said Singh. Singh recently reprised his role as contractor Phua Chu Kang for a song in support of COVID-19 vaccines. The penalties for speeding for a first-time offender are a jail term of up to three months, a fine of up to S$1,000, or both. This is doubled for repeat offenders. Drivers who are convicted of speeding can be banned from driving for whatever period the court deems fit. Singh, who was named as Gurmit Singh Virk Chainchal Singh, was unrepresented and turned up in a grey long-sleeved shirt and pants.
  3. A BMW M5 was caught speeding recklessly and beating the red light along Still Road on Wednesday (June 9) night. The 39-second clip shows multiple views of the speeding vehicle from a camcar that was at the traffic junction. According to the Road Traffic Act, drivers caught speeding will be awarded demerit points and a composition fine. After watching the video, there is no doubt that the BMW had exceeded the speed limit. Drivers who are caught exceeding the speed limit by more than 40km/h would receive 12 to 24 demerit points, along with a mandatory prosecution in court. Additionally, beating the red light will incur a fine of up to $400 and another 12 demerit points. With the recent news of actor Gurmit Singh receiving an $800 fine for speeding, I had expected Singaporeans to be more mindful and to avoid speeding on empty roads. Netizens' reactions Honestly, the few minutes that you save on your trip is not worth the consequences that come along with it. Be it an exorbitant fine or a potentially fatal car accident, you would have wished that you didn’t speed in the first place.
  4. Photo: Try Sutrisno Foo On Tuesday, local celebrity Gurmit Singh was fined S$800 and prohibited from driving for three months for speeding (Jun 8). The 56-year-old actor and broadcaster, best known for his sitcom character Phua Chu Kang and recently the super annoying tv endorsement that I am still able to remember inside my head. Mr Singh pleaded guilty to one count of exceeding the speed limit while operating a vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. The court heard that he drove at a speed of 131kmh along Woodlands Avenue 12 towards Seletar Expressway at around 9.30pm on April 12 this year, on a road where the speed limit was 70kmh. Gurmit Singh Virk Chainchal Singh, also known as Gurmit Singh Virk Chainchal Singh, arrived unrepresented and dressed in a grey long-sleeved shirt and jeans. The prosecutor requested a driving prohibition and left the sentencing to the court. Singh, according to her, has no prior convictions. Singh testified in court that he was travelling to pick up his son from his internship when he heard a "flapping sound." And just in case you guys dunno what is flapping sound, I found you guys a sound clip. District Judge Salina Ishak told him he could have put his son's life in danger, as well as his own. "I understand, your honour. I regret doing what I did," said Singh. Singh recently reprised his role as contractor Phua Chu Kang for a song in support of COVID-19 vaccines. The penalties for speeding for a first-time offender are a jail term of up to three months, a fine of up to S$1,000, or both. This is doubled for repeat offenders. Drivers who are convicted of speeding can be banned from driving for whatever period the court deems fit. Guys, watch your speed while you are driving.
  5. Hello! Today we have two Mercedes-Benzes (E63 & A200) engaging in what looks like a dangerous game of tag at Simei Road. That's TOO FAST to be safe driving. Imagine if the first car jams its brakes, the second car is screwed seven ways till Sunday. This video even managed to stir up my anxiety - I felt like I was the one being chased. It's not clear whether the two drivers know each other. Perhaps they're rushing to get to Jewel for their Beauty in a Pot reservation? It is near Simei after all. Or is it a case of road rage? Hmm questions, questions. Netizens have lots to say. Some of the comments savage AF. So, road rage or friends? What do you think?
  6. In the past 3 years, speeding has been the number one traffic offence in Singapore. About a month ago, there was a major accident which resulted in the death of the driver and all four passengers in the car. Preliminary investigations revealed that the driver was believed to have been speeding before crashing into a shophouse where the car caught fire. So what are the consequences of extreme speed and when do car modifications cross the line to possibly turn your car into a death trap? Talking Point delves into the psyche of speed demons and finds out what happens to your body when you crash at extreme speeds.
  7. https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/timeline-of-tanjong-pagar-fatal-crash
  8. Here's a video uploaded by SG Road Vigilante showing a speeding Volkswagen Scirocco zig-zagging along PIE, which also reminds me of another infamous incident caused by a speeding Kia Cerato last weekend. This happened along the Upper Bukit Timah Exit with another unrecognisable car seemingly chasing closely behind him. Putting other road users in danger The Scirocco driver then channeled his inner Alonso to manoeuvre between a tipper truck and a silver Van, overtaking both vehicles in one go. Although i have to admit that this was a well executed move, this act of weaving in and out of traffic puts other road users in danger. Reckless or dangerous driving Many drivers with common sense would already know this, but i'd just like to remind everyone that anyone driving a motor vehicle recklessly, or at a speed or manner which is dangerous to the public, is guilty of an offence. Netizens on Youtube has some comments to say about this: CNY is coming. So please ladies and gentlemen, do drive safe.
  9. TL;DR – A man has been jailed for seven weeks and slapped with a four-year driving ban for speeding, running two red lights, driving against traffic and failing to stop for traffic police. In his defence, he had a stomachache and needed to use the toilet. The next time you’re driving on the roads and ‘kena’ the-mother-of-all-stomachaches, the urge to floor the accelerator will naturally creep into your mind. But don’t do it. Just don’t. Video from SG Road Vigilante YouTube Traffic police chase a man with irritable bowel syndrome This incident occurred sometime in March 2019 in the wee hours of the morning. A man left the Marina Bay Sands Casino and drove towards his home in Jurong. He experienced a stomachache and went up to speeds of 180km/hr (while literally trying to keep his S#$% together) A traffic police officer spotted him after exiting the PIE towards Jurong Canal Drive and gave chase, but the man did not stop for them. What other crap did he do? Pun intended. He ran two red lights and drove against traffic… twice. When the traffic police managed to pull him over, he had already crapped his pants. The police had to line the back seat of the police car with a plastic sheet before he was allowed to ride in it. The punishment He has pleaded guilty to one charge of rash driving and failing to stop for a police officer. He will have to serve a seven-week jail term and a four-year-long driving ban. He will begin his jail-term on the 27th of January 2021 and is currently out on $15,000 bail. Some interesting comments I mean, if you’re that desperate, anything is possible. Can you imagine the conversation in the cell? Cellmate: “Bro, what they catch you for?” Man: “Lao Sai” It sounds like you’ll suffer the next day. Source - Today Singapore
  10. A middle-aged man in Singapore who really needed to move his bowels ended up getting jailed seven weeks and disqualified from driving for four years on Jan. 6, 2021. Hoo Tee Tuan, 57, drove at 180kmh at one point to his brother's coffee shop to answer an utmost urgent call of nature. As a result of having to do a Number 2, Hoo pleaded guilty to one charge each of rash driving and failing to stop for a police officer. Irritable bowel syndrome experienced late one night The incident happened at around 3am on March 1, 2019. Hoo left the Marina Bay Sands casino and was driving home towards Jurong. A traffic police officer saw Hoo speeding and gave chase with the car's blinkers turned on. The chase occurred after Hoo exited the Pan Island Expressway towards Jurong Canal Drive, and he hit 180kmh at one point as he was being chased. Hoo made several turns and ran two red lights, and even stopped midway and drove against traffic towards Boon Lay Way while making a turn from Jurong East Street 31. After he drove against traffic once more later, a taxi got in his way, forcing him to stop when he tried to enter a Housing and Development Board car park. Driver's pants soiled when arrested Hoo’s lawyer said his client had been suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, Today reported. When the police pulled Hoo over, he had soiled his pants by then. Hoo's lawyer said in court that the police had to line the back seat of the police car with a plastic sheet before he was allowed to enter it, according to Today. The lawyer also said Hoo was not racing and he was "looking for a toilet". He could have stopped by the road: DPP The Deputy Public Prosecutor argued that Hoo's bowel condition was not a justifiable reason for putting other road users in danger, and that he had known about his own condition for about a year. “He could have stopped along the road once he exited the highway,” Today reported the DPP saying. However, it is unclear from the news report if the DPP meant a motorist has the option of defecating by the road. The judge did ask in court if Hoo should be driving if he knew about his condition, to which the defence lawyer said his client has learned his lesson, Today also reported. Hoo is out on S$15,000 bail. He will start his jail sentence on Jan 27. Anyone found guilty of dangerous driving can be jailed up to a year or fined up to S$5,000, or both. Anyone who fails to stop for a police officer can be jailed up to three months or fined up to S$1,000, or both. source: https://mothership.sg/2021/01/singapore-man-needed-to-shit-speed/
  11. One fine and bright sunny Sunday morning, I was heading north as usual for my hobby routine. The roads were usually clear this early in the morning. My right foot feels a bit heavier than usual. The engine wants its horses to be released after a work week of low revs. After passing the two overhead bridge on CTE, the usual candid camera spots, I was going up the flyover on Bradellel. Decided to let the horses out for that momentary stamp on the accelerator hard. On the way down the flyover, forgot to release the accelerator as the pull from the engine was too mesmerising. Within a couple of seconds, a motorbike with flashing blue and red lights was at my side and waved me to stop. I had to adhere to his command and did so. We pulled to the side of the road and he parked behind me. He walked over and asked me to get out of the car and produce my NRIC and driving license. I knew I was caught speeding but I did not know how fast I was caught for. I thought, at most 120km/h. I do not look at the speedometer and drive, I was looking at the road trying to concentrate and look out for other road users as my car cut through the air. While he was radioing back his HQ to check the status of my NRIC and driving license, his accomplice arrived. Immediately, his accomplice asked me how fast I was going. I said I don’t know as I was concentrating driving on the expressway as what any good driver should. He showed me his speed camera display and it showed 143km/h. Goodness me, I was shocked too. He did a mental calculation, then told me I am lucky. Any higher and my license will be revoked. He asked for a reason for going that fast. I said I had no excuse, I was not rushing to anywhere. I plead for him to report a lower speed, but he refused. After checking my records are clean, they told me to leave and expect a summon letter within two weeks. And told me to drive carefully!!! Very chop chop, the stop lasted less than 10mins. Looking backing into my in-car video camera, I did clock 143km/h on the downslope of the flyover. I should have released the accelerator after the upslope. They were stationed between the entrance of Bradellel and exit of AMK Ave 1 on the CTE northbound. Just outside of SMRT depot. That is a busy place, cant believe they had stationed there as I have never encounter them there. One holding the speed camera, another standby at the side of his motorbike. Within two weeks, I really received a registered mail from postman. And I was formerly charged by traffic police for speeding at 143km/h over 90km/h speed limit. There was no composition fine to settle the offence. And at the bottom of the letter I was told to appear in court on a specific date and time. This time, really jia lat liao. Quickly went online to search for forums on what to do. There really isn’t much, the only close reference was in Singapore Bike Forum dated 2010. The fine was $800 to $1,000 with suspension of license from 3 months to 6 months. I asked around my friends, none of them ever encounter such high speeding cases. One friend told me his another friend’s wife kena $1,000 fine and 3 months suspension. Frankly, I am not worried about the fine. I am more worried of the suspension. I need my car for weekend travelling for my hobby. Day to day, I can rely on public transport but for my hobby, which I had advanced into larger scale models, I require a transport. So I decided to look for my MP to appeal to the court for not suspending my license. I am willing to pay the fine and have 18 points deducted as a punishment of my driving. It was a Monday evening when I met my MP, who happens to be the transport minister too(now no more liao), Mr Lui Tuck Yew. The wait was long, about one hour. Then I was met with one of the many volunteers who would write a summary of my request to Mr Lui. He was shocked at the speed I was driving too and he told me that they will not be able to interfere with court proceedings. Only thing they can do is write to traffic police to appeal. I asked how about a personal letter from Mr Lui to the judge which I will hand carry to court. He told me to ask Mr Lui later when I meet him. It was another 30mins before I am allowed to meet my MP. Upon entering the room, Mr Lui stood up, greeted me, extended his hand to shake mine. He listened to my request and politely told me that he is unable to interfere with court proceedings and is unable to write me a personal letter to the judge. He told me he will write to traffic police and try to appeal my case as I have existing medical conditions that having a car would ease my convenience. After that, he told me to take care and drive carefully!!! Prior to seeing Mr Lui, I had already prepared letters from my various specialist stating my medical condition which does not allow me prolong standing. True to his words, Mr Lui indeed wrote to traffic police and appeal my case. I received a letter from traffic police that they will review my case. However, the following week, received a letter back from traffic police that my appeal was unsuccessful and a new court date is set for my case. From here, I knew suspension of my driving license was for sure, but for how long, that will depend on the mood of the judge.
  12. 119810553_1098858070552615_6169005424589589203_n.mp4 "Hey man, where's the fire?", is what one should be asking the driver of the white Toyota. From the look of the video, the driver was going way too fast. If he wasn't rushing to a fire, maybe he was rushing off for something else... But let's not digress. As the old adage goes, "if you want to do something stupid, make sure others don't get hurt". Well, guess the driver of the Toyota didn't get the memo too. Speeding like a madman, fine. Crash into the central divider, it's your fault so live with it. But knocking into someone else after crashing your car? Not cool, man. Especially since the other car was minding their own business until they got a rude jolt because another car crashed into them. Stay safe, people. If you want to speed, buy a PlayStation or Xbox and get those racing simulator games like Gran Turismo or Forza. A lot cheaper and a whole lot safer.
  13. In case you're wondering what a Fiat Doblo looks like. It's a goods vehicle. Why is this information important for this story? Take a look at this latest viral video But, I don’t understand Malay! Don't worry! We translated the whole conversation for you thanks to my malay colleagues! Sounds similar? I think they made this video in response to another video of two guys doing 180km/hr on the expressway in a Suzuki Swift Sport. We wrote an article about that just yesterday btw (blatant backlinking opportunities should not be wasted). You may click the link below to check the story out. https://www.mycarforum.com/blogs/entry/6008-someone-is-keen-to-show-that-their-swift-sport-can-do-180kmh-on-the-cte/ On top of that, the person who uploaded the video included this in the caption It's a good laugh If you didn't realise, they weren't actually speeding. The speedometer of the vehicle seems to be faulty, and these two funny guys thought that they could have a bit of fun with it. The driver's laughter made me lol more than once. That’s for sure. Don't need call polis please and thank you!
  14. Happy Labour Day, Singapore! Some of us are thinking of how to utilise our pay that just came in. Then, there are jokers like this Toyota Wish driver who blows it all in an instant (and more). Speeding on PIE A dashcam video of the said driver has gone viral and here are some takeaways after watching the video. No one drives a Wish to speed. It's a family MPV for goodness sake. Don't do stupid things with other people's car, much less a rental Here's the 47-second video taken from SG Road Vigilante The Wish loses control at the 0.09 mark of the video. Online chatter Wow. To the Toyota Wish driver, good luck paying for all the damages for a rental car.
  15. Racing up Ulu Yam/Genting – why do we still do this? source: https://paultan.org/2020/01/13/dont-take-racing-to-the-streets-take-it-to-the-track/ Time and time again, we see incidents of sports car and supercar owners racing on the public highway. Often driving in large groups, these individuals travel at high speeds on roads frequented by other motorists simply going about their own business, and they often end up in massive accidents. Most recently, a video posted by Azman Nor on Facebook – which showed a Renault Megane RS hitting a Proton Wira and flipping over – exhibited the public’s negative perception of these irresponsible road users, with many pouring scorn over actions that could so easily have been fatal. The road on which this accident took place, the B23 leading to Ulu Yam Baharu, is a popular destination for two- and four-wheeled enthusiasts looking for a spirited blast – as is the nearby road from Batang Kali to Genting Highlands – due to its sweeping corners and thrilling elevation changes. For the Initial D generation, it’s the perfect touge substitute. As many of us who have driven there will know, however, it is also extremely treacherous. The roads consist mostly of tight two-lane tarmac, with plenty of blind bends that are often badly surfaced, potentially causing hard-cornering cars to go off their intended line – and straight into oncoming traffic. And that’s before you take into account the fact that most stretches are pitch dark at night. Despite this, however, plenty of people continue to drive hard and fast on these roads, taking liberties not only by driving at ridiculous speeds, but also cutting into oncoming lanes in the corners. Even some of the local motoring media are guilty of this – I for one will admit to being one of them, having gotten into a serious single-vehicle crash there a few years ago. So I know how easily it can all go wrong in a split second. But it doesn’t take someone like me to tell you just how dangerous speeding is. Even on a relatively straight and empty highway, driving significantly above the speed limit opens you up to the possibility of a huge crash that can maim or kill you. On a twisty rural road with slow-moving traffic, the risk only multiplies. And don’t think for a second that your Ferrari’s sticky tyres and arsenal of driver aids are going to be enough to save you. While the advent of stability control remains the single biggest improvement in vehicle safety, even the most advanced systems can only go so far to compensate for excessive speed, the limits of grip or your lack of talent. The instant you lose control at high speeds, it is often too late. Driving or riding recklessly also gives us car and bike enthusiasts a bad name. We already have a lot on our plate, from rising car prices to the growing extinction of the sports car market, losing out to the ever-popular crossover (groan). We don’t need the public to turn against our simple love of driving too, do we? But it doesn’t have to be that way. Malaysia may no longer have the multitude of race circuits that we used to, but we still have a world-class facility just an hour’s drive away from the city centre – and the barrier of entry into the world of sanctioned motorsports is going down. Race organisers like our very own Malaysia Speed Festival (MSF) are offering track days at the Sepang International Circuit from as low as RM300 for two hours, and there you can drive as fast as you like – so long as you abide to a few simple safety regulations. Those of a more competitive bent can opt for time attack events, which are held not only by MSF but also other reputable entities like Grass Racing Autosports (GRA) and Sucimuci Motorsports. These events often have categories for road cars at affordable prices, catered to those with somewhat tighter belts. And while proper multi-car racing remains an expensive affair, series like our Saga Cup are much more cost-efficient and provide more door-to-door racing than even the most exciting Formula 1 race. And what about those who still want to experience the thrill of a public road? Well, this year MSF is hosting its MSF Touge Series of hillclimb events, held on exactly the type of twisty, hilly roads that enthusiasts love – but, most importantly, with the safety of being closed to traffic and managed by people who have decades of motorsports experience. It too is open to road cars, requiring the bare minimum of safety equipment. With all these options for the budding racer, the excuse of sanctioned motorsports being prohibitively expensive is no longer valid. It never was, anyway – it was perhaps understandable (but not excusable) for low-budget drivers to speed on the public highway, but if you can afford a sports car or even a moderately powerful hot hatch, you can afford a track day. So take your need for speed to the track. And when you are driving on a public road, do it sanely and responsibly by obeying all traffic rules. Lastly, drive within your limits of both your car and yourself, and don’t be pressured by other drivers to speed up. Remember, when you’re sharing the road with other users, safety always comes first. And of course, we at paultan.org try to be responsible when we take test cars out for a drive. While we do evaluate a car’s performance characteristics, we do it within the scope of what an average driver is capable of, and we do not push it to its absolute limits. With certain high performance vehicles, we rent a circuit to test them out, or have the authorities close the road – see our first, second and third Driven Web Series hot hatch episodes for examples – or rent an airfield as with our million-ringgit sports cars episode. We will never compromise safety for the sake of readership or viewership. Here's are some of the comments.
  16. http://www.stcars.sg/guides-articles/140-roads-shortlisted-for-speed-camera-study-144849
  17. Those standing beside their car holding the speed gun, do they record and send letters later or their main function is to check from speed gun, those exceed will then give chase and issue summon on the spot? I know those caught by overhead bridge ones will be issued letters, so what about those by the roadside?
  18. And now this https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/errant-singapore-motorists-barred-leaving-malaysia-10998904?cid=fbcna Pattern more than badminton KUALA LUMPUR: Motorists from Singapore with outstanding summonses should be barred from leaving Malaysia until they settle the amount owed, said Malaysian senator Rabiyah Ali in parliament on Wednesday (Dec 5). Rabiyah said the proposal is aimed at curbing Singaporean drivers who use the country’s highways as a testing ground for their vehicles’ speed. “The problem pertaining to the illegal racing and reckless driving by luxury car drivers and high-powered motorcycles from Singapore has been a tough challenge for us to solve.
  19. SINGAPORE: New three-dimensional (3D) traffic calming markings, aimed at encouraging motorists to reduce speed, will be trialled along the Whampoa Drive Silver Zone towards the end of December. In a press release on Wednesday (Dec 5), the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said the markings, which were adopted from Japan, are intended to encourage motorists to reduce their speed because of the perceived narrower lane width. "The trial will help LTA assess the effectiveness of these new markings," the press release added. Silver Zones are specially-demarcated areas in residential zones with a large population of elderly residents and a relatively high accident rate involving seniors. Accident rates within Silver Zones have been reduced by almost 75 per cent, with an average of 14 cases per year to 4 cases per year in the 15 completed Silver Zones. There are ongoing works for another 10 Silver Zones. Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/new-3d-traffic-markings-on-trial-to-reduce-motorists-speed-10999024
  20. Ok my fast and furious story goes like this. Was waiting first in line at a traffic light on orchard boulevard. (road behind taka and wisma) This heavily modded and decalled evo 8 GSR rolled up beside me. And he revved letting out a lousd PSSST~ haha I retaliated with a loud Vroom~ from my 2.0 NA engine. The light turns Green, we both floored it and my pathetic stock shot ahead of the EVO and I celebrated my first street challenge victory with a TCed car! Flawless victory u say? Ok i was just kidding about that EVO 8 GSR. Actually I was caught speeding by 2 TP officers who clocked me at 68km/h on that 50km/h limit road. Oh boy was I in trouble for going at such a FAST AND RECKLESS SPEED. I could have killed someone going at such a high speed and I bet even my grandma would have suffered a heart attack had she been sitting by my side. Com'on officer, its 1am, the row of lights was on green and hey its a 5 lane straight road. He even asked me where was i rushing to? WAT RUSHING SOMEWHERE at 68km/h? I'll be at 120 if I was rushing! 170 fine. 8 demerits. What can i say. If u are suay you are suay. As long as anyone was above 60 on that road tt fateful night, I think you would have suffered the same fate. Was very traumatized by this incident. Had been faithfully crawling around singapore and craning my neck at every corner and behind every bush to make sure I wasn't going to be featured on "GOTCHA at 68KM/h!" again. One day, this paranoid driver may just fall asleep at the wheel and crash into a bunch of officers manning a roadblock. Cos there is a sticker at the back of his car stating "60km/h" Let this be a warning to all those Speedsters out there! 68 is way too fast! And on a sidenote, only my foggies was on and it was a clear night. The officer did not say a word! Hooray for FOGGIES!
  21. ok i know this has been discussed before, but i just need a quick answer from those who know. i got a speeding ticket exceed 1-20km/h $130 4demerit points. i also forgotten when was my last traffic offence but this is my 1st speeding offence since 1990. cut story short just wanna know any point or way to appeal and chances of success, if not, i will just pay up and forget about it.
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