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  1. Hi all, was very unlucky and got hit by a malaysian van today. My Toyota Altis is just 3 weeks old. It hit our car on the back and obviously it's the van driver's fault as we were stationary at the red light. No injuries and did a police report together. Later then found out that Borneo motors won't do a claim against 3rd party and especially a Malaysian insurance conpany. Found out that total repair cost would be $1500 but the van driver isn't willing to pay as he keep insisting he is covered by insurance and have the rights not to pay a single cent. He then verbally agreed to fork out $1k as a goodwill but it has to be over a few months as he is a blue collar construction worker here. That guy has now gone back to jb and I don't even know if he is really paying me the $1k. We definitely won't do a claim from our own insurance as my dad was at the steering wheel and excess would be in the thousands. Any kind advise from fellow forumers here? Any reliable workshop willing to do Malaysian insurance claim?
  2. Cypher

    Perodua Bezza

    Launching soon. Anybody interested in getting this car? Come let us discuss..
  3. KOTA KINABALU: Malaysian police said on Thursday (Sep 6) they are investigating the death of a 36-year-old commando officer who was shot in a live-firing demonstration at Lok Kawi Camp in Sabah on Wednesday. Major Mohd Zahir Armaya was then rushed to the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Kota Kinabalu, where he later died. Inspector-General of Police Abdul Hamid Bador said a probe will be carried out to identify the cause of the incident. “I am confident there is an SOP (standard operating procedure) and it may not be overlooked," he told reporters. "The demonstration was well organised but the accident still occurred.” He added: “The Sabah Police Commissioner will release a statement soon (on the development of the case).” Abdul Hamid also asked the public to refrain from posting any offensive comments online. TERRORIST ROLE-PLAY The exercise - held in conjunction with the launch of the Fifth Division Infantry and the 13th Infantry Brigade - involved a clash between a group of "terrorists" and the armed forces. All the participants wore bullet-proof vests. Major Mohd Zahir, who played the role of the terrorist leader, had fired a pistol at an army officer, causing him to fall on his knees in pain. The officer then stood up and fired his pistol at Mohd Zahir, who had a red bottle target on the back of his bullet vest. The shot caused Mohd Zahir to fall and two army personnel then pulled him to the side of the parade field. He appeared unconscious and was believed to have sustained serious injuries. An army medical team at the ceremony gave him first aid before sending him to hospital, where he was pronounced dead at about 9.20am. "WE WERE VERY CLOSE" On Wednesday, more than 1,000 people, including friends, family members and officials paid their last respects to Mohd Zahir at the Wardieburn Camp mosque in Kuala Lumpur. The late major's body was then buried at the Tambun Muslim Cemetery in Ipoh. He was survived by a widow and five children, aged between five months and nine years old. Mohd Zahir's father, veteran actor and comedian A R Badul, received the news of the incident from his daughter-in-law. “I received the news this morning and was shocked and sad. But I take it as a test from Allah," he told Bernama. “We were very close and he had contacted and met me before. I was told that the bullet went a little further than the bullet-proof plaque and hit his body.” Mirdat Mohamad, who is Mohd Zahir's uncle, said the family wishes for a thorough investigation to find the exact cause of the incident. "We wish for him to have a fair investigation, a fair trial and a proper closure. If this was negligence, hopefully it would not happen again in the future," said the 54-year-old. “We will leave it to the police and army." King Abdullah Ri’ayatuddin Al-Mustafa Billah Shah and his consort Azizah Aminah Maimunah Iskandariah expressed their sympathies and sadness to Mohd Zahir's family. Condolences also poured in from other Malaysian leaders, including the communications minister, the chief of army and Sabah's chief minister.
  4. Good info here for those who don't know. http://www.sgcarmart.com/news/writeup.php?AID=286&PN=1
  5. Baby abandoned at Malaysian villager's doorstep, with poignant note https://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/baby-abandoned-malaysian-villagers-doorstep-poignant-note KOTA KINABALU - A mother, apparently desperate to see her newborn son have a better life, left him at a villager's doorstep in Kota Belud some 70km from here early Sunday (June 30). The mother left a note asking for a woman of the house, a "Sumarti", to care for her child whom she had named Yusof. The mother's note said that the baby was born a day earlier and he had not drunk a drop of milk since his birth, as she was unable to lactate. The mother also wrote that she was unable to bring the child for vaccination, buy milk formula, diapers or anything for her baby, and that she was not capable of raising the child. The woman did not leave her name on the letter, but she seems to know the family as she wrote that she was sure "Sumarti" would be able to provide for the child and give him the love that he deserves. The last part of her letter read, "I want someone to love Yusof. I, as a mother, have failed to care for Yusof. Yusof has been very thirsty and hungry since early morning". Kota Belud police chief Supt Mohd Zaidi Abdullah said in the 5.30am incident, the woman Sumarti was woken up by her mother who had heard a baby crying outside their house. "Sumarti read the note and checked for injuries on the baby," he said when contacted Monday (July 1). Sumarti brought the baby to the police station and lodged a report at about 8.57am. upt Mohd Zaidi said Sumarti does not know of anyone in the village who had just given birth, and said she is unsure who left the child at her doorstep. He said policemen took the baby for a medical examination and welfare officials were alerted. He said the baby was found to be healthy and has been handed over to welfare officials for further action. It is unclear at this moment whether Sumarti will adopt the baby. The matter was posted on Facebook page Irranun Peace, which saw hundreds of users expressing their best wishes for the child and praising the mother who did not dump her baby and leave him to die. There were also quite a number of people who asked if they could adopt the child.
  6. oh my god... hope passengers will be safe...
  7. https://www.kinitv.com/video/24ebcc40-287b-4c1c-92b8-269a02892b2e Was watching an extract of a speech from the Shangri-La Dialogue By Malaysia's Defence Minister Mohamad Sabu. He has been widely criticised by many for his poor command of English on geopolitical issues. I listened to the entire dialogue as it is and though broken at times it was easily understood and the gist of the message was not lost. He used simple English instead of bombastic words. English may not be a country first language. Are politicians expected to speak a certain level of English? I would certainly be more concerned about getting the main facts right than working hard to be a grammar nazi. English is lingua franca, widely spoken in many countries. When we go overseas to countries whose native language isn't English we speak to them in English expecting them to understand. Looking at the shift of major power in the world today should we be shocked if the lingua franca one day becomes Mandarin? Fair enough to assume the rise of China will be accompanied by the rise of Mandarin? Where will that leave the Americans? Who are widely known to perceive the world as "It's okay everybody speaks English anyway." Just interested to hear more opinions. Here's his message for those unable to view the video: So what did Mohamad speak about? Christchurch terror attack “accident” in New Zealand The video began with Mohamad touching on the Christchurch terror attack in March 2019. He condemned terrorism and praised the response of New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern to the attack. Mohamad said: “So, we understand that terrorist is no border, and no ideology, and no religion. So we have to fight with them in soft way and hard way. But I am very appreciate the role of the Prime Minister of New Zealand, how she faced with the accident in New Zealand. We appreciate him, that’s the way the world leader should behave when that thing happen in their country. So I salute the Prime Minister of New Zealand.” Mohamad then addressed the sources of terror funding, calling them the “father” and “mother” of terrorists. Elaborating on how terrorists have access to advanced weaponry and funding, Mohamad said: “These terrorists, who’s the father and mother? Because they have a lot of money, they have very sophisticated weapons. If they’re an NGO, I think they cannot afford to have that modern weapon.” Mohamad then referenced the presence of terrorists groups in Idlib, Syria, adding: “And now in Idlib, they even have rocket launcher. So who’s the father and mother? We must our intelligence must share and expose who the mother and father, then we can reduce their activity throughout the world.” China’s regional activity: “The China coast guard is bigger than Malaysia warship” Subsequently, Mohamad talked about the behaviour of China in the region and stressed the need for diplomacy, given that “the China coast guard is bigger than Malaysia warship”. Mohamad highlighted: “We know China is a border with us, China is near to us. So, any they changing of the policy will affect us. That’s why we — I know… sometimes they send their coast guard. The China coast guard is bigger than Malaysia warship. So how can we begin to chase them? So we cannot fight with them. But we will always talk to them, defend diplomacy, respect sovereignty…” Mohamad then referenced the opening speech of Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, on May 31, who stated that a clash between America and China will see many nations affected. “… and if they (China) send a warship there, then America will also challenge them. So, when the elephant fight, the grass will suffer. When elephant laugh, the grass will suffer. That’s mentioned by Prime Minister Lee last night. So we must active defend diplomacy, that we must get together, many time, this not the first time, second time or third time, many time to dialogue, because we want to keep the peace neutrality zone in this area, especially in South China Sea.” Mohamad concluded his speech by criticising the behaviour of large countries for not sticking to their rhetoric of respecting the sovereignty of other countries, as laid down by international treaties: “Big powers, they come and they give speech, they say we respect sovereignty, we respect UNCLOS, we respect COC (Code of Conduct), but their behaviour is different. That is we, the small country, especially ASEAN, we must unite together to face this problem. Thank you very much.”
  8. SINGAPORE — Drivers in Malaysia-registered cars are flouting Singapore's laws by providing point-to-point transport services for tourists here. Under the law, all cars without a Public Service Vehicle Licence — including Malaysia-registered private cars — cannot be used to provide taxi or chauffeured private-hire car services in Singapore. Singapore drivers offering chauffeured services told TODAY that the problem has been around a long time, but some of them have noticed that more Malaysia-registered cars are muscling in on the Singapore market in the past few months. They are typically seen picking up tourists from Changi Airport Terminals 2 and 4, and ferrying them to hotels in the city-centre. They have also been observed shuttling tourists to and from major tourist attractions here, such as Sentosa resort island, Gardens by the Bay and the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple and Museum, the drivers said. When TODAY contacted Malaysia-based transport companies to enquire about rates for a trip from Changi Airport to a hotel in downtown Singapore, at least five companies — Big World Transport, Ben Travel, 168 Go Heng, Ace Transport and HBC Transport Agency — offered the service. The cost of a one-way trip for four riders on a seven-seat Malaysia-registered vehicle ranged between S$50 and S$80, they said. One company, 168 Go Heng, said that it would cost S$90 if riders took a Singapore-registered vehicle, which will be S$40 more than a Malaysia-registered one. By and large, payment is collected after services are rendered, although one firm asked for payment via "banking". These firms tout their services on social-networking platforms such as Facebook, and mobile applications such as Carousell or their own websites. Many list mobile-phone numbers, so customers may book their services through messaging apps WhatsApp or WeChat, or via SMS (short message service). They advertise round-the-clock trips to and from Changi Airport and major tourist attractions such as Universal Studios Singapore and Resorts World Sentosa, as well as journeys between Singapore and Malaysia. When told of the concern that such a service was illegal, a representative of Ben Travel said: "If you are scared, you can book a Singapore car. Never mind." Responding to the same concern, a representative from HBC Transport Agency showed TODAY proof of the company's Malaysian business registration, adding: "We are a registered company." When this reporter identified himself and sought official comments, the Ben Travel representative said that his company was registered as a travel firm and has not encountered any problems at Singapore Customs after the necessary company documentation is presented. "(We do) not go to the Singapore taxi stands (to) take the customer. I just take the customers (through) all the bookings (received by) my travel company… (for) transport," he added. The HBC Transport Agency representative said that its drivers pick up customers daily and have not faced "any problem". It would be a problem if Malaysian drivers competed with Singapore taxi drivers for riders, he added. Addressing this issue, a Land Transport Authority (LTA) spokesperson told Chinese daily Lianhe Wanbao last week that all vehicles without a Public Service Vehicle Licence, including Malaysia-registered private cars, are not allowed to provide taxi or chauffeured private-hire car services in Singapore. Between January 2016 and June 2018, the authority took action against 20 Malaysia-registered vehicles which flouted the rules. TODAY has also reached out to the LTA for comment. SINGAPORE DRIVERS UP IN ARMS AS BUSINESS SUFFERS Drivers providing chauffeured services here are vexed with the growing presence of Malaysia-registered cars which they see as a threat to their rice bowl, saying their business has been hit by up to half since as early as a year ago. Some among them also felt that they were undercut by their counterparts from across the Causeway, with the Malaysian drivers offering services at as much as half the rates they offer. A driver, who wanted to be known only as Mr Lim, 50, said that these Malaysian drivers are unfamiliar with the roads here, as he has been stopped by them on several occasions, requesting directions to the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple and Museum, for instance. They also do not hold a vehicle Certificate of Entitlement, nor do they fork out road tax or provide passenger insurance in the event of an accident. "A major concern is they will spoil the image of Singapore, because should any accident happen, the tourists will not be able to claim the personal insurance (since the services) are not legal," he added. Mr Lim reported this matter to the LTA last month. A fellow driver, who identified himself only as Mr Kelvin, 32, said: "We (Singapore drivers) have the Private Hire Car Driver's Vocational Licence and the Taxi Driver's Vocational Licence. We're allowed to do such jobs from all the apps… (and provide) all the details they need — car licence, licence-plate number, insurance — but these Malaysian drivers really (don't have to do anything)," he said. The Singapore authorities should compel Malaysian drivers wishing to provide chauffeured services in Singapore to register a business here, Mr Kelvin added. Source: https://www.todayonline.com/singapore/malaysian-transport-firms-providing-illegal-services-here-make-singapore-drivers-see-red So this is the reason why I’ve been seeing more and more msian car on our road.
  9. WHY?!! Malaysian charged with committing incest with nieceBUTTERWORTH: A 36-year-old jobless man claimed trial at the Sessions Court here to committing incest with his 15-year-old niece at a guest house near here on Christmas Day. The man, whose name was not revealed to protect the identity of his niece, was charged with committing the offence which is said to have taken place at a guest house in Perkampungan Berapit between 2am and 4am on Dec 25, 2017. The accused was charged under Section 376B of the Penal Code for incest, which carries a jail term of 10 to 30 years and whipping upon conviction. Under Section 376B, a person is said to have committed incest if he has sexual intercourse with another person whose relationship to him is such that he is not permitted to marry her under the law, religion or custom. Sessions judge Noor Aini Yusof denied bail and fixed Feb 6 for mention pending a medical report. DPP Roslina Idris prosecuted while the accused was unrepresented. According to initial police investigations, the girl had followed her uncle to the guest house after he allegedly told her that her father had been arrested by the police on Christmas Eve. Central Seberang Prai OCPD Asst Comm Nik Ros Azhan Nik Abdul Hamid said the man then gave her a soft drink and allegedly raped her. http://www.asiaone.com/malaysia/malaysian-charged-committing-incest-niece
  10. hi, anyone recently encountered any prob with our northern polis-men? any encounter with polis who try to make a quick buck by claiming your veh is on the summons' list when it clearly isn't? just to get some ground sensing. thanks.
  11. audng76

    Honda Vezel on Malaysian road

    Hi. Has anyone driven the Honda Vezel up north to Malacca or KL? How's the performance?
  12. So will they start to u turn again when fewer hotels want to collect this money for them? So all I have to do is get my Malaysia counterparts or someone local to book and check in for me, and there i dont have to pay what tax liao. And then suddenly, more locals are staying in their own hotels, and visitors start to stay on the street. Silly. http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/se-asia/5000-malaysian-hotels-start-imposing-tourism-tax KUALA LUMPUR • •Some 5,000 hotels around Malaysia have started implementing a new tourism tax for foreign visitors. Foreign tourists are charged a flat rate of RM10 (S$3.20) per night per room, while Malaysians and permanent residents are exempted. "We will impose a RM10 flat rate from five-star to zero-star hotels for foreign tourists, and Malaysians will be exempted from the tax across all classifications of hotels," Tourism and Culture Minister Nazri Aziz told Parliament last week, as quoted by The Star newspaper.He said his ministry had estimated that the government would be able to collect RM210 million a year, based on an average occupancy rate of 60 per cent of the 237,391 rooms currently registered with the government. Get The Straits Times newsletters in your inboxSIGN UP The plan to introduce the tourism tax had been controversial, especially in Sabah and Sarawak, which were worried fewer tourists would visit the two East Malaysian states. The government had initially planned to charge between RM2 and RM20 per night, depending on the type of accommodation. Malaysian Association of Hotels president Sam Cheah Swee Hee said hotel operators started charging the tourism tax on Friday. "Not all hotel operators are ready. We will do it manually until the system is ready," he said. He added that hoteliers would submit their tax collection to the Customs and Excise Department by next month. The department is taking a "friendly approach" to encourage hotels and lodging operators to register for the tourism tax, said its director-general, Datuk Seri Subromaniam Tholasy. "We will not be harsh as the announcement of the tax came a little late," he added. The government announced early last month that the tourism tax was to be enforced from Friday. Mr Subromaniam said the department would try to contact hotel operators that have not registered, rather than chase them to quickly do so. The number of registered accommodation providers so far is 5,000, out of the estimated 10,000 establishments nationwide. "We are giving hotel operators another month. We expect all to register with us by the end of September," he added. Bernama news agency reported that hoteliers must display the newly introduced tax rate separately from the room rates. Malaysian Association of Hotels (Sarawak Chapter) honorary secretary-general John Teo Peng Yew said hotel and resort operators need to adhere to the new ruling, following a recent meeting with the Finance Ministry and the Customs and Excise Department.
  13. Congratulation to Malaysian You can truly be proud of what the country had achieve because it all through handwork and dedication...and not resorting to buying medals..unlike a certain neighboring cuntry. Malaysian teen wins bronze in diving
  14. RIP to those who died, condolences to the families. Must be even harder during this holiday period. http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/muar-bus-crash-kills-13 For those driving up, drive carefully and stop for rest / shut eye if tired. I wonder if buses fitted with seat belts could have saved some lives in this case.
  15. Carer

    Malaysian chinese accent

    did u realise that the chinese malaysians speak is different from us? my china fren says singaporean chinese sounds like taiwanese and also hongkonger and of course china chinese speak with the 'roll tongue' effect
  16. KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysia’s first and only astronaut to date, Dr Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor announced yesterday (Jan 27) his venture into e-commerce with the Aladdin Group of Companies, which he believes can be a halal rival to Internet business giants Amazon and Alibaba. Dr Sheikh Muszaphar is the co-founder for Aladdin, which will be based in 30 countries, with the headquarters in Kuala Lumpur. It would select merchants which are either halal certified by the Islamic Development Department of Malaysia (Jakim) or those who comply with the Shariah guidelines to market on its site. Launched by former Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi yesterday, Aladdin could end up costing closer to US$100 million (S$143 million) over the next three years for all its operations and marketing in 30 countries. The headquarters and the domestic site, which starts operations today, had cost US$5 million. “What we aim to achieve is to compete with the likes of Amazon and Alibaba, and maybe even be bigger than them one day. Aladdin represents an opportunity for young entrepreneurs to gain halal certification and immediately gain access to 30 markets globally,” Dr Sheikh Muszaphar said during the launch at Aladdin’s headquarters here. He also said that the global demand for halal products was growing and that Muslim consumers would now have an avenue where they can “feel safe and assured” while purchasing products. “But, we would also like it to appeal to non-Muslims. Because halal is not about religion alone, it is also about ethics and hygiene,” he said further. The website, Aladdin Street, brands itself as the “world’s first exclusive premium halal e-marketplace.” Among the major markets it would expand to over the next three years includes Indonesia, India, China, the Middle East, and parts of Europe. Azizi Meor Ngah, a well known corporate figure who is also on the board of the Halal Industry Development Corporation (HDC), will serve as executive director for Aladdin’s operations. MALAY MAIL ONLINE
  17. https://www.facebook.com/Roads.sg/videos/1073212819377787/
  18. two lives for one saw another news in Singapore that a husband and wife also abuse the maid till she lost 20kg
  19. The Immigration and Checkpoints Authority (ICA) on Monday morning arrested a 33-year-old Malaysian man who attempted to drive out of the Woodlands Checkpoint while undergoing checks. This happened after he was unable to produce his travel document at the arrival car counter. The alarm was activated and the arrival car zone was locked down immediately. This is the fourth such incident at the Woodlands Checkpoint this year. ICA said in a statement that it is currently investigating the incident. Source: http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/m-sian-arrested-over/1078668.html
  20. Jman888

    Malaysian students in S'pore

    $550 (or RM1650) for secondary school still have to spend on daily transport and brave the morning jam
  21. Obleveonn

    Malaysian ringgit

    dear all, I would like to ask if the second series msian ringitt is still considered legal tender in msia. if not, can i exhacnage them for the current series? tks...
  22. Canada Pension Plan Investment Board ("CPPIB") and Pavilion Group ("Pavilion") today announced the creation of a joint venture to invest in Pavilion Damansara Heights, a mixed-use development project in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. As part of the joint venture, CPPIB will commit approximately MYR485 million (C$170 million) for a 49% interest in the development. Representing CPPIB's first direct real estate investment in Malaysia, Pavilion Damansara Heights is a freehold development integrating corporate towers, luxury residences and a retail galleria. The development is located in one of the most prime and affluent locations in Kuala Lumpur, less than 10km from Petronas Twin Towers. It is well connected by a network of highways and strategically served by two upcoming MRT stations within walking distance to the development. "We are pleased to make our first direct real estate investment in Southeast Asia through this joint venture with one of Malaysia's most well-respected developers, the Pavilion Group," said Jimmy Phua, Managing Director and Head of Real Estate Investments Asia. "This joint venture fits well with our investment strategy as it provides us with a great opportunity to work with a smart partner in a high-quality real estate asset that will provide attractive risk-adjusted returns over the long term." Pavilion is an experienced local developer of commercial and residential projects and is one of the strongest and most well-established Malaysian retail developers. Pavilion has developed several prominent retail malls, office and retail projects in Kuala Lumpur. "We are looking forward to the opportunity to partner with CPPIB in this exciting development in Kuala Lumpur," said Mr Timothy Liew, Project Director of Pavilion Group. "It is a highly anticipated landmark for Damansara Heights, set within Malaysia's most affluent neighbourhood, offering a world-class integrated development that is synonymous with the Pavilion Brand."
  23. Anybody follow Malaysian politics? Getting very exciting. http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/mobile/malaysia/article/najibs-suit-wont-silence-me-says-dap-lawmaker --------------- Tony Pua I will not be shackled by the defamation suit brought by the Dato’ Seri Najib Razak because I am supported by millions of Malaysians out there who demand good governance, transparency and accountability from the Prime Minister and his Government My lawyer, Gobind Singh who is also the Member of Parliament for Puchong, has received the writ served by Dato’ Seri Najib Razak’s lawyers at 4.30pm yesterday evening. The suit by the Prime Minister accused me of having defamed him in my speech at a DAP Petaling Jaya Fund-Raising Dinner on 3 November 2014 where I spoke extensively on the “mother of the mother of the mother of all scandals”, 1Malaysia Development Bhd (1MDB). This suit is the first defamation suit ever brought by a Prime Minister against a Member of Parliament in Malaysia. It appears that the timing of the suit is coming at a time when 1MDB is facing a massive crisis on all fronts – the inability to service its massive RM42 billion debt, and mounting exposés on fraudulent transactions and even possibly embezzlement billions of ringgit of 1MDB funds. Hence the suit could have been filed as a strategy to silence me and other Government’s critics. However, I would like to inform the Prime Minister that if that was the plan, he has failed miserably. Instead, the suit only strengthened my motivation to pursue, investigate and expose more corruption, abuse of power and incompetence in 1MDB as well as other Government activities, knowing that I am on the right track. I will certainly not be shackled by the suit because I know I am supported by millions of Malaysians who are equally astounded by the sheer audacity of the 1MDB scam. Like me, they demand good governance, transparency and accountability from the Prime Minister and his Government. I would like to declare here that I will contest the suit by the Prime Minister. At the same time, I would like to express my gratitude to the many lawyers who have contacted me to offer their services pro bono. ----------------------------
  24. SEREMBAN, Malaysia - Doctors at Tuanku Ja'afar Hospital will perform a surgery to remove a bullet that was lodged in the rib cage of Malaysian Crime watch Task Force (MyWatch) chairman R Sri Sanjeevan. State police chief Datuk Osman Salleh said the 29-year-old Sanjeevan has been warded at the hospital's intensive care unit in stable condition. "He was moved from the Kuala Pilah hospital early today for the surgery," SAC Osman said. SAC Osman said the victim was shot once. The bullet pierced his right elbow and lodged in the right side of the rib cage. "We have also put our men on duty at the hospital to prevent any untoward incident," he said. Sanjeevan's family members are keeping vigil at the hospital since he was brought here from Kuala Pilah. Sanjeevan, a bachelor, was shot by a pillon rider when he stopped his BMW car at a traffic light junction in Taman Cempaka at about 4.30pm on Saturday. He was then with another friend. SAC Osman said both the riders on the motorcycle had dark complexion and wore full-faced helmets. Sanjeevan managed to drive some 300m and later asked his friend to take over the wheel. He was taken to the Jempol hospital and later to Kuala Pilah hospital. Police have classified the case as attempted murder under Section 307 of the Penal Code. SAC osman said police have detained Sanjeevan's 35-year-old friend for an unrelated case. "His friend was on the police's wanted list for a drug related offence. "I wish to state here that the friend was not detained for the shooting incident as reported by the social media," he said.
  25. http://www.themalaymailonline.com/opinion/alwyn-lau/article/my-year-in-singapore This is the personal opinion of the columnist. Alwyn is enduring a doctorate in Political Philosophy. His day job involves making teaching less painful. He also torments Sociology students on occasion. He blogs at wyngman.blogspot.com. MARCH 30 -- It was a dream job. 2001. I joined a banking project in Singapore. One time I was on this flight, there was this anorexically challenged guy bragging about his job in Kiasu-land... someone (stupidly) asked him in what currency he was paid, he answered so loudly even the Changi control tower could have heard it, “I’M PAID IN SING DOLLARS!” Wow. The almighty SGD. That elixir of life every KL exec hopes to drink from. That potion of success which Malaysians can’t wait to “quietly” inform their peers of. It’s like a Rolex which causes us to, uh, roll up our sleeves and wave our hands more often? Anyway, so there I was. A year in Singapore. About 50 weeks longer than the usual fortnightly vacations I’d take to see my cousins there when I was younger. There are many things a Malaysian would greet with relief across the Causeway, and I was no exception. I mean, where do I start? No more policemen hiding under flyovers (Singapore police, so I heard, also “hide” but it’s WAY more clandestine and sexy than the way “Bersih, Cekap & Amanah” does it). No more train or bus queues which stretch to the moon and back. No more roads and corridors with rotten food strewn all over, barely a few feet from the trash cans. No more chewing gum and cigarette smoke. No more waits at government departments during which one could do a Masters degree. No more traffic jams because no need to drive; indeed, no need to even think about buying a car as the very phrase “Certificate of Entitlemeent” is liable to cause brain damage. Voice as symptom So yeah. Nice. But then there were some “anomalies.” I noticed that practically everyone I was dealing with at work… was Malaysian. I noticed that very few people exhibited the natural kind of relaxation (or even joy) one “feels” in Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Hanoi, etc. As in, most folks in Singapore appear to be either rushing somewhere or stressed out about something. Why? (Seriously—why?) I also noticed that if shopping in KL was rated 4-star, then in Singapore shopping was a bleedin’super-NOVA. Orchard Road makes Jalan Bukit Bintang look like an alleyway in Batang Berjuntai. Also, the “voice” coming from the Singapore MRT trains, the one which announces the next station, sounds like a dude who just crawled across the Sahara with a knife stuck in his back and with barely a drop of water left in his larynx. Dhoby Ghaut sounds like “dubbigot” with the volume turned down and the spirit turned lower. This phenomenon echoed the fact that Singaporeans are (officially?) among the most unhappy people on the planet. Compare this to our Malaysian trains. The way the LRT voice says Kelana JAYA!! it’s like the girl hit a SPM home-run of 14 As and Khairy Jamaluddin just proposed to her… all in the same day. Damn, after hearing that kind of announcement I tell myself I have to get off at this stop. Another problem. To be fair this isn’t entirely a Singaporean thing; it’s really more a Chinese thing, IMO: the crazy late nights. The company I joined had this paradoxical habit, not at all helped by the project being based in what’s affectionately known as Kiasu-land: Everbody knew that if you want to be in the bosses’ good books, you can’t leave a MINUTE earlier than 8pm. People who leave before 6pm have to cover their faces like convicts. It didn’t matter whether you did any work at all between 9am and 5pm; in fact, it would beirrational to slog from the morning because you’d be too tired to carry on till 8pm. The nett result? You had dozens of (relatively well-paid) executives “taking it easy” in the morning and afternoon, only to raise their game between 5pm and 8pm. Why? Because this made them look great for appraisal purposes. Sure, the projects were still on time. Sure, people were still working. Sure, the money was still coming in. But “beneath” it all was a lie; the efficiency was supported by mass deception and feigning. And stress was unnecessarily high with relationship-time, obviously, being unhelpfully low (everyone left after 8pm, remember?). Was this attitude symptomatic of the island-state? Things look great, clean and prosperous on the outside but people keep mum about certain strange things? It’s all great until it’s not Of course we know what else happened in 2001. I was at Morton’s when the first plane hit. And I was sitting in my Toa Payoh condo staring in disbelief as both the towers came crashing down. 9/11. An act of war, literally, out of the blue. The very thought that any nation would bomb the heart of American capitalism was – until that fateful day - funny. Given the US’ military invincibility, its geographical distance from Europe and the Mid-East, was it impossible for a mega-structure like the Twin Towers to be taken down within a few hours? I think there’s a lesson here for Singapore. Lee Kuan Yew’s methods and policies have brought wealth, resilience and stature to the island-state. Education-wise, Singaporeans are in a league of their own. As a financial hub? Heck, it’s playing a different sport from the rest of ASEAN. So everything’s okay – until they’re not okay. It’s like, the United States is safe – until two airplanes get hijacked and used as missiles. Despite an internationally enviable GDP, Singaporeans are by and large still gloomy. I don’t care so much for “happiness” but if we lack joy (not the same thing) then things can’t be that good. In a twisted way, perhaps the island-state’s greatest strength is also its biggest risk. Lee Kuan Yew’s proudest legacy may also mirror his most hazardous one : An obsessive drive for success, both political and economic. I left the island in December 2001. I don’t regret working there but I don’t regret leaving either. In a sense, I’m thankful that my year in Singapore taught me much. One of the best lessons is one I’ve had to relearn over and over again: We can succeed, make money, be respected – but at what price? And most critically, when will the bill arrive?
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